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Are College Lectures Unfair?

Article
Paul, Annie Murphy
2015
The New York Times, New York, NY, September 12,
Topics: Teaching Diverse Students   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory

Additional Info:
Short, accessible, review of several recent studies showing that lectures are a pedagogical technique that “favor some people while discriminating against others, including women, minorities and low-income and first-generation college students.” All the more reason for adopting active learning strategies that have proved to be more effective for ALL learners.
Additional Info:
Short, accessible, review of several recent studies showing that lectures are a pedagogical technique that “favor some people while discriminating against others, including women, minorities and low-income and first-generation college students.” All the more reason for adopting active learning strategies that have proved to be more effective for ALL learners.
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Breakthrough Strategies: Classroom-Based Practices to Support New Majority College Students

Book
Ross, Kathleen A.
2016
Harvard Education Press, Cambridge, MA
LC3731.R68 2016
Topics: 18-22 Year Olds   |   Learning Designs   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Breakthrough Strategies identifies effective strategies that faculty have used to help New Majority students—those from minority, immigrant, or disadvantaged backgrounds—build the necessary skills to succeed in college. As the proportion of New Majority students rises, there is increased attention to helping them gain access to college. Once enrolled, however, these ...
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Breakthrough Strategies identifies effective strategies that faculty have used to help New Majority students—those from minority, immigrant, or disadvantaged backgrounds—build the necessary skills to succeed in college. As the proportion of New Majority students rises, there is increased attention to helping them gain access to college. Once enrolled, however, these students often face significant challenges of adjustment, with few resources for support. Specifically, there is little attention to students’ experiences within their college classrooms and their relationships with professors. At the same time, faculty who work with these students have little guidance on how to help them adjust to new expectations and identities as they engage with college-level work.

Sister Kathleen A. Ross, a MacArthur fellow and president emerita of Heritage University, has devoted three decades to helping New Majority students get college degrees. Based on an action-research project undertaken at Heritage University and Yakima Valley Community College in Washington State, the book highlights eleven strategies to encourage student success, including: asking questions in class; navigating the syllabus; and developing an academic identity. Written in a warm, down-to-earth voice, Breakthrough Strategies is infused with the belief that faculty can become a powerful resource for students, and that classroom instruction can be an important vehicle for supporting these students’ development and success. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword (Michelle Asha Cooper)

ch. 1 The Breakthrough Strategies Project
ch. 2 Welcome to Heritage University
ch. 3 Communication, Culture, and the New Majority

Part One - Strategies For Engagement
ch. 4 Engaging Students Through Effective Feedback
ch. 5 Helping Students Ask Questions
ch. 6 Engaging Students with Analogies

Part Two - Strategies To Promote A Sense of Belonging
ch. 7 Welcoming Students with First-Day Activities
ch. 8 Relating to Students’ Life Situations
ch. 9 Reframing the Classroom as Community

Part Three - Strategies to Engender Confidence
ch. 10 Creating Confidence: A Professor’s Role
ch. 11 Journaling for Confidence and Deeper Thinking
ch. 12 Developing Students’ Own Academic Ideas

Part Four - Strategies To Build A Vision For The Future
ch. 13 Envisioning an Academic Identity: How Professors Can Help
ch. 14 Building Professional Identities to Counter Stereotypes

Notes
Acknowledgements
About the Author
Index
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Ensuring the Success of Latino Males in Higher Education: A National Imperative

Book
Saenz, Victor B.; Ponjuan, Luis; and Figueroa, Julia, eds.
2016
Stylus, Sterling, VA
LC2670.6.E67 2016
Topics: Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
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Latino males are effectively vanishing from the American higher education pipeline. Even as the number of Latinas/os attending college has actually increased steadily over the last few decades, the proportional representation of Latino males continues to slide relative to their Latina female counterparts.

The question of why Latino males ...
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Latino males are effectively vanishing from the American higher education pipeline. Even as the number of Latinas/os attending college has actually increased steadily over the last few decades, the proportional representation of Latino males continues to slide relative to their Latina female counterparts.

The question of why Latino males are losing ground in accessing higher education—relative to their peers—is an important and complex one, and it lies at the heart of this book. There are several broad themes highlighted, catalogued along with the four dimensions of policy, theory, research, and practice. The contributors to this book present new research on factors that inhibit or promote Latino success in both four-year institutions and community colleges in order to inform both policy and practice. They explore the social-cultural factors, peer dynamics, and labor force demands that may be perpetuating the growing gender gap, and consider what lessons can be learned from research on the success of Latinas. This book also closely examines key practices that enable first generation Latino male undergraduates to succeed which may seem counterintuitive to institutional expectations and preconceived notions of student behavior.

Using narrative data, the book also explores the role of family in persistence; outlines how Latino men conceptualize fulfilling expectations, negotiate the emasculization of the educational process, and how they confront racialization in the pursuit of a higher education; uncovers attitudes to help-seeking that are detrimental to their success: and analyzes how those who succeed and progress in college apply their social capital – whether aspirational, navigational, social, linguistic, familial, or resistant.

While uncovering the lack of awareness at all levels of our colleges and universities about the depth and severity of the challenges facing Latino males, this book provides the foundation for rethinking policy; challenges leaders to institutionalize male-focused programs and services; and presents data to inform needed changes in practice for outreach and retention. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword (William Serrata)
Preface (Victor B. Sáenz)
Acknowledgments

Part One: Introduction and Context-Setting: Latino Males in K–12 and Higher Education
ch. 1 Current Trends and Future Outlooks on the Pervasive Gender Gap in Educational Attainment for Latino Males (Victor B. Sáenz, Luis Ponjuán, and Julie López Figueroa)
ch. 2 Latino Males in American High Schools: An Examination of the 2012 High School Longitudinal Study (Luis Ponjuán)

Part Two: Exploring Theories to Understand the Pathways for Latino Males in Higher Education
ch. 3 The Geography of Academic Support: A Framework to Understand the Latino Male Perceptions and Practices in Higher Education (Julie López Figueroa)
ch. 4 (Re)Constructing Masculinity: Understanding Gender Expectations Among Latino Male College-Going Students (Julie López Figueroa, Patricia Pérez, and Irene I. Vega)
ch. 5 An Intersectionality Analysis of Latino Men in Higher Education and Their Help-Seeking Behaviors (Nolan L. Cabrera, Fatemma D. Rashwan-Soto, and Bryant G. Valencia)

Part Three: Research on Preparation, Persistence, and Success for Latino Males in Secondary and Postsecondary Education
ch. 6 Latino Male High School Math Achievement: The Influential Role of Psychosociocultural Factors (Ismael Fajardo, José M. Hernandez, and José Muñoz)
ch. 7 Examining the Role of Family in Mexican American College Men’s Academic Persistence (Lizette Ojeda and Linda G. Castillo)
ch. 8 Over the Ivy Wall: Latino Male Achievers Nurturing Cultural Wealth at a Highly Selective Predominantly White Research University (David Pérez II)
ch. 9 Caballeros Making Capital Gains in College: The Role of Social Capital in First-Year Persistence at a Predominantly White 4-Year Institution (Tracy L. Arámbula)

Part Four: Moving From Research to Practice: Meeting the Needs of Latino Males in Higher Education
ch. 10 Latino Males In Higher Education: Administrator Awareness of the Emerging Challenges (Victor B. Sáenz, Sarah Rodriguez, Katie Ortego Pritchett,Jennifer Estrada, and Kelty Garbee)
ch. 11 Educational Opportunity, College Choices, and Higher Education: What Can We Learn From Research on Latinas? (Miguel A. Ceja)
ch. 12 Collaborative Consciousness: Improving Latino Male Student Research, Policy, and Practice (Luis Ponjuán)

Editors and Contributors
Index
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Graduate Education at Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs): A Student Perspective

Book
Palmer, Robert T.; Walker, Larry J.; Goings, Ramon B.; Troy, Charmaine; Gipson, Chaz T.; Commodore, Felecia, eds.
2016
Routledge, New York, NY
LC2781.G68 2016
Topics: Diversifying the Faculty   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Highlighting the voices and experiences of Black graduate students at Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs), this book features the perspectives of students from a variety of academic backgrounds and institutional settings. Contributors discuss their motivation to attend an HBCU for graduate studies, their experiences, and how these helped prepare them for their career. To be prepared to serve the increasing number of Black students with access to graduate programs ...
Additional Info:
Highlighting the voices and experiences of Black graduate students at Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs), this book features the perspectives of students from a variety of academic backgrounds and institutional settings. Contributors discuss their motivation to attend an HBCU for graduate studies, their experiences, and how these helped prepare them for their career. To be prepared to serve the increasing number of Black students with access to graduate programs at HBCUs, university administrators, faculty, and staff require a better understanding of these students’ needs and how to meet them. Addressing some of today’s most urgent issues and educational challenges, this book expands the literature on HBCUs and provides insight into the role their graduate schools play in building a diverse academic and professional community. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword (Terence Hicks)
Acknowledgments
Introduction

ch. 1 Contextualizing Graduate Education at Historically Black Colleges and Universities (Robert T. Palmer, Larry J. Walker, Ramon B. Goings, Charmaine Troy, Chaz T. Gipson, and Felecia Commodore)
ch. 2 A Strange Song in a Familiar Land (Lamar Hylton)
ch. 3 Journey to the PhD: A Personal Narrative of Doctoral Studies at an HBCU (Tiffany F. Boykin)
ch. 4 Graduate Level Education at Historically Black Colleges and Universities: A Three Part Qualitative Exposition (Antonio L. Ellis, Christopher N. Smith, and Janatus A. Barnett)
ch. 5 Back to the Roots (Sheree Alexander)
ch. 6 Praise for the Bridge: My Doctoral Journey at Morgan State University (Kimberly Hardy)
ch. 7 Free to Conduct Research of Race and Racism in My West Baltimore Community (Julius Davis)
ch. 8 The Historically Black College and University Family: A Perspective on a Graduate Level Online Accelerated Cohort Program (Kimberly R. Eldridge)
ch. 9 Twice the Experiences: Graduate School at Two Comprehensive Public HBCUs (Stevie L. Lawrence II)
ch. 10 The Significant Value of Historically Black Colleges and Universities (Tara D. Miller)
ch. 11 A Liberating Spirituality: Evaluating Theological Education at a Black Graduate School (Herbert Robinson Marbury)
ch. 12 Strange Fruit: The Contribution of the Historically Black College and University (HBCU) to the Development of the Black Intelligentsia (F. Abron Franklin)

About the Editors
About the Contributors
Index
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Incarcerated Religion: Teaching behind Walls - Editor’s Introduction

Journal Issue
Glennon, Frederick, ed.
2016
Spotlight on Teaching, May 31,
BL41.S72
Topics: Teaching Diversity and Justice   |   Teaching Diverse Students   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online.

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Incarcerated Religion: Teaching behind Walls – Editor's Introduction (Fred Glennon)
ch. 2 Opening My Eyes: Teaching in a Women's Prison (Elizabeth M. Bounds)
ch. 3 Education as Social Transformation (Andrew Skotnicki)
ch. 4 Incarcerated Trust: The Challenge of Prison Teaching (James Wetzel)
ch. 5 Quotes, Notes, Questions (Joshua Dubler)
ch. 6 Theology and Ministry at Garden State Correctional Facility (Melanie Webb)

Resources
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Multiculturalism on Campus: Theory, Models, and Practices for Understanding Diversity and Creating Inclusion, 2nd Edition

Book
Cuyjet, Michael J.; Linder, Chris; Howard-Hamilton, Mary F.; and Cooper, Diane L.
2016
LC1099.3.M87 2016
Topics: Changes in Higher Education   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
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The first edition of this book constituted a comprehensive resource for students of higher education, faculty, higher education administrators and student affairs leaders engaging with multiculturalism and diverse populations on college campuses. It was one of the first texts to gather in a single volume the related theories, assessment methods, and ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
The first edition of this book constituted a comprehensive resource for students of higher education, faculty, higher education administrators and student affairs leaders engaging with multiculturalism and diverse populations on college campuses. It was one of the first texts to gather in a single volume the related theories, assessment methods, and environmental and application issues pertinent to the study and practice of multiculturalism, while also offering approaches to enhancing multicultural programming and culturally diverse campus environments.

This second edition retains the structure and vision of the first, introducing readers to the key theories and models for understanding the complexity of the students they serve, and for reflecting on their own values and motivations. It provides an array of case studies, discussion questions, examples of best practice, and recommendations about resources for use in the classroom.

This edition includes a new chapter on intersectionality; updates several chapters, presents a number of new cultural frameworks and updated best practices for creating an inclusive environment for marginalized groups, and expands the third section of the book on cultural competent practice. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction (Michael J. Cuyjet)

Part One: Awareness of Cultural Issues
ch. 1 Understanding Multiculturalism and Multicultural Competence Among College Students (Mary F. Howard-Hamilton, Michael J. Cuyjet, and Diane L. Cooper)
ch. 2 Oppression and Its Effect on College Student Identity Development (Mary F. Howard-Hamilton and Kandace G. Hinton)
ch. 3 Environmental Influences on College Culture (Michael J. Cuyjet and Jason L. Meriwether)
ch. 4 An Intersectional Approach to Supporting College Students (Chris Linder)

Part Two: Information on Cultural Populations
ch. 5 Latinx College Students (Susana Hernández and Anna M. Ortiz)
ch. 6 Asian American and Pacific Islander Students (Julie J. Park and OiYan A. Poon)
ch. 7 African American College Students (Bettina C. Shuford and Lamont A. Flowers)
ch. 8 Native America College Students (LeManuel Bitsóí (Navajo)
ch. 9 Biracial and Multiracial College Students (Kristen A. Renn and Marc P. Johnston-Guerrero)
ch. 10 Working With White College Students to Understand and Navigate White Racial Identities (Chris Linder)
ch. 11 International College Students (Sevan G. Terzian and Leigh Ann Osborne)
ch. 12 Men and Women College Students (Merrily Dunn and Philip D. Badaszewski)
ch. 13 Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender College Students (Dena R. Kniess, Tony W. Cawthon, and Kristin M. Walker)
ch. 14 Adult College Students- (Fiona J. D. MacKinnon and Rosiline D. Floyd)
ch. 15 College Students With Disabilities (Martha E. Wisbey and Karen S. Kalivoda)
ch. 16 Religious and Spiritual Diversity Among College Students (Laura A. Dean and Darris R. Means)

Part Three: Critical Consciousness of Cultural Competence
ch. 17 From Cultural Competence to Critical Consciousness: Creating Inclusive Campus Environments (Chris Linder and Diane L. Cooper)

Contributors
Index
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Race, Equity, and the Learning Environment The Global Relevance of Critical and Inclusive Pedagogies in Higher Education

Book
Tuitt, Frank; Haynes, Chayla; Stewart, and Saran, Stewart, eds.
2016
Stylus, Sterling, VA
LC196.R327 2016
Topics: Critical Pedagogies   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
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Abstract: At a time of impending demographic shifts, faculty and administrators in higher education around the world are becoming aware of the need to address the systemic practices and barriers that contribute to inequitable educational outcomes of racially and ethnically diverse students.

Focusing on the higher education learning environment, this ...
Additional Info:
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Abstract: At a time of impending demographic shifts, faculty and administrators in higher education around the world are becoming aware of the need to address the systemic practices and barriers that contribute to inequitable educational outcomes of racially and ethnically diverse students.

Focusing on the higher education learning environment, this volume illuminates the global relevance of critical and inclusive pedagogies (CIP), and demonstrates how their application can transform the teaching and learning process and promote more equitable educational outcomes among all students, but especially racially minoritized students.

The examples in this book illustrate the importance of recognizing the detrimental impact of dominant ideologies, of evaluating who is being included in and excluded from the learning process, and paying attention to when teaching fails to consider students’ varying social, psychological, physical and/or emotional needs.

This edited volume brings CIP into the realm of comparative education by gathering scholars from across academic disciplines and countries to explore how these pedagogies not only promote deep learning among students, but also better equip instructors to attend to the needs of diverse students by prioritizing their intellectual and social development; creating identity affirming learning environments that foster high expectations; recognizing the value of the cultural and national differences that learners bring to the educational experience; and engaging the “whole” student in the teaching and learning process. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword (Lori D. Patton)
Acknowledgements
Introduction: Critical and Inclusive Pedagogy: Why the Classroom Is All it’s Cracked Up to Be (Chayla Haynes)

Section I. How We Think About Our Work
ch. 1 Advancing a Critical and Inclusive Praxis: Pedagogical and Curriculum Innovations for Social Change in the Caribbean (Saran Stewart)
ch. 2 A Democratic Pedagogy for a Democratic Society: Education for Social and Political Change (T-128) (Eileen de los Reyes, Hal Smith, Tarajean Yazzie, Yamila Hussien, and Frank Tuitt; with contributions by José Moreno, Anthony De Jesus, Dianne Morales, and Sarah Napier)
ch. 3 Pursuing Equity Through Diversity: Perspectives and Propositions for Teaching and Learning in Higher Education (Liza Ann Bolitzer, Milagros Castillo-Montoya, and Leslie A. Williams)

Section II. How We Engage in Our Work
ch. 4 Humanizing Pedagogy for Examinations of Race and Culture in Teacher Education (Dorinda J. Carter Andrews and Bernadette Castillo)
ch. 5 Radical Honesty: Truth-Telling as Pedagogy for Working Through Shame in Academic Spaces (Bianca C. Williams)
ch. 6 Using the Barnga Card Game Simulation to Develop Cross-Cultural Thinking and Empathy (David S. Goldstein)
ch. 7 Campus Racial Climate and Experiences of Students of Color in a Midwestern College (Kako Koshino)

Section III. Measuring the Impact of Our Work
ch. 8 De-Racializing Japaneseness: A Collaborative Approach to Shifting Interpretation and Representation of “Culture” at a University in Japan (Ioannis Gaitanidis and Satoko Shao-Kobayashi)
ch. 9 Unsung Heroes: Impact of Diverse Administrators on the Creation of the Transformative, Affirming, and Equitable Learning Environments (Stella L. Smith)
ch. 10 Dehumanizing and Humanizing Pedagogies: Lessons From U.S. Latin@ and Undocumented Youth Through the P-16 Pipeline (Lisa Martinez, Maria Salazar, and Debora Ortega)
ch. 11 Critical Pedagogy and Intersectional Sexuality: Exploring Our Oppressions and Privileges Through Reflexivity, Responsibility, and Resistance (Haneen Ghabra, Sergio Juarez, Shanna Kattari, Miranda Olzman, and Bernadette Calafell)

Conclusion: Inclusive Pedagogy 2.0: Implications for Race, Equity, and Higher Education in a Global Context (Frank Tuitt The Editors and Contributors)
Additional Info:
A short essay written by a student in the 1990s who regards herself as introverted, describing the particular qualities and experiences associated with her personal style. Posted on Mark Unno’s website, who teaches Buddhism at the University of Oregon.
Additional Info:
A short essay written by a student in the 1990s who regards herself as introverted, describing the particular qualities and experiences associated with her personal style. Posted on Mark Unno’s website, who teaches Buddhism at the University of Oregon.
Cover image

Spanning the Divide Latinos/as in Theological Education

Book
Hernández, Edwin I.; Peña, Milagros; Turner, Caroline Sotelo Viernes; and Salazar, Ariana Monque
2016
AETH, Orlando, FL
BV4030.H47 2016
Topics: Theological Education   |   Changes in Higher Education   |   Diversifying the Faculty   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
This book provides a detailed look at the current state of Latino/a theological education in the United States. This includes consideration of the career development and opinions of Latinos/as in seminary education, as well attention to other important modes of Latino/a theological education, like non-degree programs and Hispanic-serving organizations ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
This book provides a detailed look at the current state of Latino/a theological education in the United States. This includes consideration of the career development and opinions of Latinos/as in seminary education, as well attention to other important modes of Latino/a theological education, like non-degree programs and Hispanic-serving organizations like the HTI and HSP. Another goal of this project was to make recommendations for ways in which schools of theology can do a better job preparing the next generation of Latino/a religious leaders to serve as bridge builders for the future. Thus, we paid special attention to how hospitable theological educational institus are to Hispanics.

This book also offers recommendations on improving Latino/a recruitment, revamping the curriculum and Hispanic ministry education, tending better to the sense of community on campuses, and so much more. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
List of Tables and Figures
Foreword
Preface
Acknowledgments

Part One - Overview
Introduction
ch. 1 Lifting the Veil: A Look Inside Theological Educational Institutions

Part Two - Latino/a Seminary Students
ch. 2 Taking Roll: What Are Latino/a Seminary Students
ch. 3 Hearing the Call: Latinto/a Seminarians Vocational Motivations and Views about the Church’s Role in Society
ch. 4 Finding the Right Fit: How Latino/a Seminarians Choose Their Schools
ch. 5 Bringing Their Gifts: Experience and Education of Latino/a Seminarians
ch. 6 Facing the Gap: How Latino/a Seminarians Evaluate Their Institution’s Quality and Commitment to Diversity
ch. 7 Serving Their Own: What Seminaries Can Do to Help Latinos/as Prepare for Ministry to the Hispanic Community

Part Three - The World of Latino/a Faculty in Theological Education
ch. 8 Latino/a Theological Faculty: A Close Look
ch. 9 Latino/a Theological Faculty: A Cross-Racial Comparison
ch. 10 Faculty Diversity in Theological Education: The Continuous Challenge of Inclusion with Justice

Part Four - Alternative Pathways and Best Practices in Latino/a Theological Education
ch. 11 Making Progress: How One Institution is Successfully Improving Its Approach to Training Latino/a Religious Leaders
ch. 12 Empowering Hispanic Ministry in Greater Grand Rapids: A Case Study
ch. 13 The Alternative Path and Latino/a Concerns: The AETH Study of Bible Institutes
ch. 14 Caring For Their Own: Latino/a Theological Education As Done By HTI/HTIC and HSP

Conclusion - Spanning The Divide
Bibliography
The Authors
Additional Info:
A short essay written by a student in the 1990s who regards herself as extrovert, describing the particular qualities and experiences associated with her personal style. Posted on Mark Unno’s website, who teaches Buddhism at the University of Oregon.
Additional Info:
A short essay written by a student in the 1990s who regards herself as extrovert, describing the particular qualities and experiences associated with her personal style. Posted on Mark Unno’s website, who teaches Buddhism at the University of Oregon.
TTR cover image

Transformations: The World Religions Survey through an Adjunct Feminist Lens

TTR
Downie, Alison
2015
Teaching Theology and Religion 18, no. 3 (2015): 193-206
BL41.T4 v.18 no. 3 2015
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   18-22 Year Olds   |   Mentoring Students   |   Teaching Diverse Students   |   Teaching for Transformation

Additional Info:
This essay describes a transformation in my experience as an adjunct teaching underprepared students from one of shame toward a desire to assert the value of this work. Insights from my feminist theological training helped me to affirm the importance of encouraging transformative learning in teaching the academically marginalized and prompted my analysis of student writing in an introductory World Religions course, in order to determine whether or not the ...
Additional Info:
This essay describes a transformation in my experience as an adjunct teaching underprepared students from one of shame toward a desire to assert the value of this work. Insights from my feminist theological training helped me to affirm the importance of encouraging transformative learning in teaching the academically marginalized and prompted my analysis of student writing in an introductory World Religions course, in order to determine whether or not the course was a site of transformative learning. I argue that despite many contextual limitations, the movement toward deepening self-awareness and increasing openness to religious diversity seen in student writing demonstrates that transformative learning began in this course, and that is valuable for students' lives whether or not they are academically successful.
Additional Info:
An overview of the research on “universal design,” which aims to design instruction to maximize the learning of students from a wide variety of ethnic and racial backgrounds, English language skills, learning styles, and disabilities.
Additional Info:
An overview of the research on “universal design,” which aims to design instruction to maximize the learning of students from a wide variety of ethnic and racial backgrounds, English language skills, learning styles, and disabilities.
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