Academic Histories and Contexts

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Hurrying Toward Zion: Universities, Divinity Schools, and American Protestantism

Book
Cherry, Conrad
1995
Indiana University Press, Bloomington, IN
BV4030.C46 1995
Topics: Theological Education   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
The colorful study of university divinity schools in America.
This historical analysis of American Protestant university-related divinity schools tells their story in terms of powerful social and cultural forces that decisively influenced American education in general and Protestant theological education in particular. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
The colorful study of university divinity schools in America.
This historical analysis of American Protestant university-related divinity schools tells their story in terms of powerful social and cultural forces that decisively influenced American education in general and Protestant theological education in particular. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Introduction: Visions and Strategies of Influence

pt. I Specialization
ch. 1 Strategies for a System of Education
ch. 2 Educating to Understand the Other
ch. 3 Theological and Religious Sciences

pt. II Professionalization
ch. 4 Theory and Practice
ch. 5 Two Yokes of Responsibility

pt. III Formation and Reform
ch. 6 Social Class and Social Gospel
ch. 7 Formation and the Heritage of Revolt

pt. IV Pluralism
ch. 8 The Challenge of Social and Cultural Diversity
ch. 9 The Challenge of the Multiversity

Conclusion: The Ambiguities of a Heritage
Notes
Index
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Should God get tenure?

Book
Gill, David W., ed.
1997
Eerdmans, Grand Rapids, MI
LC383.S46 1997
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
During the twentieth century, theological and religious perspectives have been marginalized, if not utterly excluded, in many of our colleges and universities. The essays in this book argue in different ways for the critical, appreciative, inclusion of theological and religious perspectives in higher education. The contributors believe that even in our secular, religiously disestablished era, religion and God continue to occupy an important and dynamic role in personal and social ...
Additional Info:
During the twentieth century, theological and religious perspectives have been marginalized, if not utterly excluded, in many of our colleges and universities. The essays in this book argue in different ways for the critical, appreciative, inclusion of theological and religious perspectives in higher education. The contributors believe that even in our secular, religiously disestablished era, religion and God continue to occupy an important and dynamic role in personal and social life. If our colleges and universities are to fulfill their higher aspirations of educating whole persons for the real world in all of its diversity and challenge, we need to go bravely against the flow and "give God tenure." (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Contributors
Introduction: Should God Get Tenure? (David W. Gill)

ch. 1 On Being a Professor: The Case of Socrates (Bruce R. Reichenbach)
ch. 2 Academic Excellence: Cliche or Humanizing Vision? (Merold Westphal)
ch. 3 Religion, Science, and the Humanities in the Liberal Arts Curriculum (H. Newton Malony)
ch. 4 Tolstoy and Freud on Our Need for God (Robert C. Roberts)
ch. 5 Religious Toleration and Human rights (Paul A. Marshall)
ch. 6 Christianity, Higher Education, and Socially Marginalized Voices (Lauree Hersh Meyer)
ch. 7 Diversity, Christianity, and Higher Education (Robert G. Clouse)
ch. 8 Evangelical Civility and the Academic Calling (Richard J. Mouw)
ch. 9 Ethics With and Without God (David W. Gill)
ch. 10 C. S. Lewis on Eros as a Means of Grace (Corbin Scott Carnell)
ch. 11 Faith and Imagination (Jill Pelaez Baumgaertner)
ch. 12 Prayer and Higher Education (Carnegie Samuel Calian)
ch. 13 What We Can Learn About Higher Education from the Jesuit (W. Ward Gasque)
ch. 14 The Evangelical Mind in America (Mark A. Knoll)
ch. 15 The Brethren and Higher Education: Tension and Tradition (Donald F. Durnbaugh)

Postscript: J. Omar Good: The Man and His Legacy (Earl C. Kaylor, Jr)
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Calling: Essays on Teaching in the Mother Tongue

Book
Griffin, Gail B.
1992
Trilogy Books, Pasadena, CA
LB2332.3.G75 1992
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Diversifying the Faculty   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
With a mixture of autobiographical facts and literary insights, the author (English, Kalamazoo Coll.) supports her belief that the ``motherheart must be at the center of all teaching.'' Teachers should ``create an environment where human beings can grow in and toward the fullness of themselves.'' This type of teaching is exemplified by the women teachers in higher education of the mid-1800s who, as the author found following ...
Additional Info:
With a mixture of autobiographical facts and literary insights, the author (English, Kalamazoo Coll.) supports her belief that the ``motherheart must be at the center of all teaching.'' Teachers should ``create an environment where human beings can grow in and toward the fullness of themselves.'' This type of teaching is exemplified by the women teachers in higher education of the mid-1800s who, as the author found following her ``calling'' to Kalamazoo College, were the leaders in a profession that often brings teacher and student together in crisis situations, situations that the author believes are better confronted from a feminist perspective. This is a well-written, often humorous account of one woman's entry into the feminist side of academe. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
The fortunate fall
The fair arcadian hill, or "Yes there really is"
Alma mater
A rite of passage
Serafina: an angel in my house
A good and worthy voice
Man hating: voices in the dark
Teacher’s pet
Orphans of the storm: the F-word and the post-feminist generation
Vocation
A purple creature
No abstract fires: a new year’s message
Unlearning not to speak, or Why the caged bird sings
A room of one’s own revisited, or, Running away to New Jersey and other holy places
To the land of the dead and back again: my "last lecture."
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Honored but Invisible: An Inside Look at Teaching in Community Colleges

Book
Grubb, W. Norton and Associates
1999
Routledge, New York, NY
LB2331.G78 1999
Topics: Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
Based on the most extensive research on community college teaching to date, this book examines the nature of teaching and the institutional forces that shape it in a variety of course settings, ranging from innovative approaches to complex subjects to conventional didactic instruction.

Drawing on observations of and interviews with over 300 instructors and administrators, this book documents the idiosyncratic instructional practices of teachers who learn to teach primarily ...
Additional Info:
Based on the most extensive research on community college teaching to date, this book examines the nature of teaching and the institutional forces that shape it in a variety of course settings, ranging from innovative approaches to complex subjects to conventional didactic instruction.

Drawing on observations of and interviews with over 300 instructors and administrators, this book documents the idiosyncratic instructional practices of teachers who learn to teach primarily by trial and error. It argues that in order to realize their enormous potential, community colleges must take greater advantage of the many institutional influences on the quality of teaching--such as personnel policies, instructor training, and the culture established by administrators--only then will they be able to successfully carry out their many roles in both mainstream education and in workforce development. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Introduction: Who Cares for Teaching in Community Colleges? The Rationale and Methodology of Our Inquiry

ch. 1 Instructors' Approaches to Pedagogy and the Multiple Conceptions of "Good Teaching"
ch. 2 The Modal Classroom: The Varieties of Lecture/Discussion
ch. 3 Lecture/Workshop and "Hands-On" Learning: The Complexities of Occupational Instruction
ch. 4 Literacy Practices in the Classroom: The Foundation of Schooling
ch. 5 Remedial/Developmental Education: The Best and the Worst
ch. 6 Standards and Content: The Special Dilemmas of Community Colleges
ch. 7 Innovative Practices: The Pedagogical and Institutional Challenges
ch. 8 The Institutional Influences on Teaching: The Potential Power of "Teaching Colleges"
ch. 9 Funding and Policy: The Neglect of Teaching
ch. 10 Alternative Futures: Creating the "Teaching College"

References
Appendix
Index
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Theological Education in the Evangelical Tradition

Book
Hart, D.G. and R. Albert Mohler, eds.
1996
Baker Academic, Grand Rapids, MI
BV1640.T47 1996
Topics: Theological Education   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
The purpose of this volume, according to the editors, "is to provide historical perspective necessary for measuring the strength, vitality, and character as well as the weaknesses and failures of evangelical theological institutions." This study accomplishes this goal by examining the origins, distinctive contributions, and tensions within theological education in the evangelical tradition. The essays are organized by themes: a historical survey of theological training in various theological traditions, the ...
Additional Info:
The purpose of this volume, according to the editors, "is to provide historical perspective necessary for measuring the strength, vitality, and character as well as the weaknesses and failures of evangelical theological institutions." This study accomplishes this goal by examining the origins, distinctive contributions, and tensions within theological education in the evangelical tradition. The essays are organized by themes: a historical survey of theological training in various theological traditions, the place of spiritual formation, the role of women in theological education, the relationship between the academy and the church, and perspectives on the future of evangelical theological education. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword (Richard J. Mouw)
Introduction (D. G. Hart, R. Albert Mohler, Jr.)
Contributors

ch. 1 The Baptist Tradition (Timothy George)
ch. 2 The Early Methodist Episcopal Experience (Russell E. Richey)
ch. 3 Holiness Churches (Melvin E. Dieter)
ch. 4 Presbyterian and Methodist Education (Gary Scott Smith)
ch. 5 The Era of Protestant Orthodoxy (Richard A. Muller)
ch. 6 New Divinity Schools of the Prophets (David W. Kling)
ch. 7 The Nineteenth Century (James E. Bradley)
ch. 8 Ministry to Women in the Antebellum Seminaries (Karen E. Gedge)
ch. 9 Learning in the Margins (Virginia Lieson Brereton)
ch. 10 Science and the Presbyterian Academies (Nina Reid-Maroney)
ch. 11 Spurgeon and British Evangelical Theological Education (David W. Bebbington)
ch. 12 Kuyper and Dutch Theological Education (James D. Bratt)
ch. 13 Canadian Protestant Theological Education (James D. Bratt)
ch. 14 Educating the Church (Gabriel Fackre)
ch. 15 Thinking of the Future (Albert Mohler, Jr.)
ch. 16 Challenge of Evangelical Theological Education (Albert Mohler, Jr.)
ch. 17 Educating for a Countercultural Spirituality (David F. Wells)

Bibliographical Essay (D. G. Hart)
Index
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Religious Higher Education in the United States: A Source Book

Book
Hunt, Thomas C. and James C. Carper, eds.
1996
Garland Publishing, New York, NY
LC383.R47 1996
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Theological Education   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
Higher education today suffers from lack of a clearly articulated purpose-a deficiency particularly challenging to religious-affiliated institutions. What is the relationship of secular learning to the faith that originally undergirded these institutions? This book offers the reader answers to this and other major questions currently facing denomination-affiliated institutions of higher education. Following a chapter on civil government's relationships to these institutions, 24 chapters survey the colleges, universities, and seminaries associated with ...
Additional Info:
Higher education today suffers from lack of a clearly articulated purpose-a deficiency particularly challenging to religious-affiliated institutions. What is the relationship of secular learning to the faith that originally undergirded these institutions? This book offers the reader answers to this and other major questions currently facing denomination-affiliated institutions of higher education. Following a chapter on civil government's relationships to these institutions, 24 chapters survey the colleges, universities, and seminaries associated with denominations. Each chapter begins with an historical essay followed by annotated bibliographic entries covering primary and secondary sources dating back to 1986 on various denomination-connected institutions. There are 614 bibliographic entries, an epilogue on critical issues covered throughout the book, as well as a subject and author index. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction (Thomas C. Hunt, and James C. Carper)

ch. 1 Government Aid to and Regulation of Religious colleges and universities (Ralph D. Mawdsley)
ch. 2 The educational system of the church of Jesus Christ of latter day saints (Robert L. Millett)
ch. 3 Quakers and higher education (William C. Kashatus)
ch. 4 Lutheran college education in the US (Richard W. Solberg)
ch. 5 Reformed colleges and seminaries (Peter P. DeBoer)
ch. 6 Higher Education among Churches of Christ (Robert E. Hooper)
ch. 7 Moravian colleges and universities (Daniel R. Gilbert)
ch. 8 United Church of Christ colleges, universities and seminaries (Lowell H. Zuck)
ch. 9 Disciples of Christ colleges, universities and seminaries (John M. Imbler)
ch. 10 Episcopal colleges and universities (Donald S. Armentrout)
ch. 11 Higher education institutions of the Church of the Brethren (Kenneth M. Shaffer)
ch. 12 Foursquare Gospel Church colleges (John C. Holmes)
ch. 13 Wesleyan Colleges and University (John C. Holmes)
ch. 14 Free Methodist Colleges (John C. Holmes)
ch. 15 Catholic Higher Education in the US (Gerald P. Fogarty, S. J., Mary A. Grant, Anna M. Donnelly)
ch. 16 Baptist Colleges and Universities (Jerry M. Self)
ch. 17 Seventh Day Adventist higher Education in the US (George R. Knight)
ch. 18 Jewish Seminaries and colleges (Harold S. Wechsler)
ch. 19 American Bible colleges (Virginia Lieson Brereton)
ch. 20 Higher education in the United Methodist Church (L. Glenn Tyndall)
ch. 21 Mennonite Institutions of higher education (Donovan D. Steiner, and Judy H. Mullet)
ch. 22 Independent Christian colleges and universities (William Vance Trollinger, Jr.)
ch. 23 Church of the Nazarene Universities, colleges and theological seminaries (Harold E. Raser)
ch. 24 Pentecostal colleges and seminaries
Epilogue (Edith L. Blumhofer)

Indexes
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Three Rival Versions of Moral Enquiry: Encyclopedia, Genealogy and Tradition

Book
MacIntyre, Alasdair
1990
University of Notre Dame Press, Notre Dame, IN
BJ37.M23 1990
Topics: Philosophy of Teaching   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
Alasdair MacIntyre—whom Newsweek has called "one of the foremost moral philosophers in the English-speaking world"—here presents his 1988 Gifford Lectures as an expansion of his earlier work Whose Justice? Which Rationality? He begins by considering the cultural and philosophical distance dividing Lord Gifford's late nineteenth-century world from our own. The outlook of that earlier world, MacIntyre claims, was definitively articulated in the Ninth Edition of the Encyclopaedia Brittanica, which ...
Additional Info:
Alasdair MacIntyre—whom Newsweek has called "one of the foremost moral philosophers in the English-speaking world"—here presents his 1988 Gifford Lectures as an expansion of his earlier work Whose Justice? Which Rationality? He begins by considering the cultural and philosophical distance dividing Lord Gifford's late nineteenth-century world from our own. The outlook of that earlier world, MacIntyre claims, was definitively articulated in the Ninth Edition of the Encyclopaedia Brittanica, which conceived of moral enquiry as both providing insight into and continuing the rational progress of mankind into ever greater enlightenment. MacIntyre compares that conception of moral enquiry to two rival conceptions also formulated in the late nineteenth century: that of Nietzsche's Zur Genealogie der Moral and that expressed in the encyclical letter of Pope Leo XIII Aeterni Patris.
The lectures focus on Aquinas's integration of Augustinian and Aristotelian modes of enquiry, the inability of the encyclopaedists' standpoint to withstand Thomistic or genealogical criticism, and the problems confronting the contemporary post-Nietzschean genealogist. MacIntyre concludes by considering the implications for education in universities and colleges. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Introduction

Adam Gifford's Project in Context
Genealogies and Subversions
Too Many Thomisms?
The Augustinian Conception of Moral Enquiry
Aristotle and/or/against Augustine: Rival Traditions of Enquiry
Aquinas and the Rationality of Tradition
In the Aftermath of Defeated Tradition
Tradition against Encyclopaedia
Tradition against Genealogy
Reconceiving the University as an Institution and the Lecture as a Genre

Index
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The Secularization of the Academy

Book
Marsden, George M. and Bradley J. Longfield, eds.
1992
Oxford University Press, New York, NY
LC383.S43 1992
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
A searching exploration of a century and a half of higher education in American culture. This book will enliven, and inform, the wide-ranging discussion now taking place. Bringing together eleven new essays--most published here for the first time--on the secularization of American, British, and Canadian higher education, this text maps some of the major contours of a largely unexplored topic. It focuses on the histories of leading universities since the ...
Additional Info:
A searching exploration of a century and a half of higher education in American culture. This book will enliven, and inform, the wide-ranging discussion now taking place. Bringing together eleven new essays--most published here for the first time--on the secularization of American, British, and Canadian higher education, this text maps some of the major contours of a largely unexplored topic. It focuses on the histories of leading universities since the late nineteenth century, analyzing the transition from an era when organized Christianity and its ideals had a major role in leading institutions of higher education to an era when they have almost none. This book is an important resource for students of religion and the history of education. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Contributors
Introduction

ch. 1 The Soul of the American University: An Historical Overview (George M. Marsden )
ch. 2 From Evangelicalism to Liberalism: Public Midwestern Universities in Nineteenth-Century America (Bradley J. Longfield)
ch. 3 Secularization and Sacralization: Speculations on Some Religious Origins of the Secular Humanities Curriculum, 1850-1900 (James Turner )
ch. 4 Faith and Learning in the Age of the University: The Academic Ministry of Daniel Coit Gilman (D.G. Hart )
ch. 5 "For God, for Country, and for Yale": Yale, Religion, and Higher Education between the World Wars (Bradley J. Longfield )
ch. 6 "The Survival of Recognizably Protestant Colleges": Reflections on Old-Line Protestantism, 1950-1990 (Robert Wood Lynn )
ch. 7 American Learning and the Problem of Religious Studies (D.G. Hart )
ch. 8 American Catholic Higher Education, 1940-1990: The Ideological Context (Philip Gleason )
ch. 9 The Secularization of British Universities since the Mid-Nineteenth Century (David Bebbington )
ch. 10 Protestant Colleges in Canada: Past and Future (G.A. Rawlyk)
ch. 11 Christianity and the University in America: A Bibliographical Essay (D.G. Hart.)

Index
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The Making of the Modern University: Intellectual Transformation and the Marginalization of Morality

Book
Reuben, Julie A.
1996
University of Chicago Press, Chicago, IL
LA227.1.R48 1996
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
What is the purpose of higher education, and how should we pursue it? Debates over these issues raged in the late nineteenth century as reformers introduced a new kind of university - one dedicated to free inquiry and the advancement of knowledge. In the first major study of moral education in American universities. Julie Reuben examines the consequences of these debates for modern intellectual life. Based on extensive research at ...
Additional Info:
What is the purpose of higher education, and how should we pursue it? Debates over these issues raged in the late nineteenth century as reformers introduced a new kind of university - one dedicated to free inquiry and the advancement of knowledge. In the first major study of moral education in American universities. Julie Reuben examines the consequences of these debates for modern intellectual life. Based on extensive research at eight universities - Harvard, Yale, Columbia, Johns Hopkins, Chicago, Stanford, Michigan, and California at Berkeley - Reuben examines the aims of university reformers in the context of nineteenth-century ideas about truth. She argues that these educators tried to apply new scientific standards to moral education, but that their modernization efforts ultimately failed. By exploring the complex interaction between institutional and intellectual change, Reuben enhances our understanding of the modern university, the secularization of intellectual life, and the association of scientific objectivity with value-neutrality. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Introduction

ch. 1 The Unity of Truth
ch. 2 Science and Religion Reconceived
ch. 3 The Open University
ch. 4 The Reconstruction of Religion
ch. 5 Scientific Substitutes for Religion
ch. 6 Value-Free Science
ch. 7 From Truth to Beauty
ch. 8 Administrative Order

Conclusion
Notes
Index
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Proclaiming and Sustaining Excellence: Assessment as a Faculty Role

Book
Schilling, Karen Maitland and Karl L. Schilling
1998
George Washington University, Washington, DC
LB2331.S345 1998
Topics: Curriculum Design and Assessment   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
This book provides a brief history of the most recent wave of assessment in higher education, particularly focused on the faculty role in assessment. It traces major conceptual, methodological, political and policy advances in assessment over the past decade. The authors suggest some ways of thinking about assessment, strategies, and next steps which they view as necessary for more clearly envisioning assessment as a faculty role. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
This book provides a brief history of the most recent wave of assessment in higher education, particularly focused on the faculty role in assessment. It traces major conceptual, methodological, political and policy advances in assessment over the past decade. The authors suggest some ways of thinking about assessment, strategies, and next steps which they view as necessary for more clearly envisioning assessment as a faculty role. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction
ch. 1 Conceptual or theoretical advances such as the talent-development or value-added perspective
ch. 2 Methodological advances such as multiple measures of performance
ch. 3 Policy advances, including changing notions of accountability
ch. 4 The faculty's involvement in assessments, with examples
ch. 5 Envisioning assessment as a faculty role in a supportive fiscal and policy context
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Reason for the Hope: The Futures of Roman Catholic Theologates

Book
Schuth, Katarina
1989
Michael Glazier, Inc, Wilmington, DE
BX905.S38 1989
Topics: Theological Education   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
This new 8-volume series brings us the seasoned fruits of modern scholarship. The authors are personally and pastorally aware of the theological concerns and challenges of our time and are attuned to the needs of contemporary students. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
This new 8-volume series brings us the seasoned fruits of modern scholarship. The authors are personally and pastorally aware of the theological concerns and challenges of our time and are attuned to the needs of contemporary students. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Preface
Introduction: Background, Methodology, and Scope of the Study

Part I. Historical background
A. How the Seminary Developed
B. The Houses of Study of Religious Orders and Congregations: A Historical Sketch

Part II. Mission and Management
A. Missions of Theologates
B. Governance
C. Finances

Part III. Personnel and Students
A. Administration
B. Faculty
C. Students

Part IV. Formation Programs for Future Ministers
A. Personal and Spiritual Formation
B. Academic Formation
C. Pastoral Formation and Field Education

Part V. Future Goals and Directions of Tehologates in Relation to the Needs of the Roman Catholic Church in the United States
A. Church and Society: Theologate Response to Special Concerns
B. The Futures of the Roman Catholic Theologates: Challenges and Opportunities

Appendices
Bibliography
Index
Additional Info:
In Seminaries, Theologates, and the Future of Church Ministry, Sr. Schuth details some of the ways seminaries are responding to the ministerial requirements of the Church of today and tomorrow. Extensive research images of Church, priesthood, and ministry are taken from a broad sample of faculty, students, administrators, and trustees to answer such questions as: What is the nature of the local and universal mission of the Church in which ...
Additional Info:
In Seminaries, Theologates, and the Future of Church Ministry, Sr. Schuth details some of the ways seminaries are responding to the ministerial requirements of the Church of today and tomorrow. Extensive research images of Church, priesthood, and ministry are taken from a broad sample of faculty, students, administrators, and trustees to answer such questions as: What is the nature of the local and universal mission of the Church in which people seek to serve these days? What is their vision of the church's future? How must people be prepared to carry, out the vision they hold about the church's ministry? What are their fears, hopes, anxieties about ministering in the Church? and What would be their one wish for the future? Studies of what parishioners expect of their Church and ministers complement the internal views. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Preface
Introduction
Background
Methodology
Outline of the Study

Part I. Context
ch. 1 Surviving the Shaking of the Foundations: United States Catholicism in the Twenty-First Century
ch. 2 Reaping Harvests, Sowing Seeds: Vatican Influences and National Developments in United States Seminaries from the Mid-Nineteen Eighties to the Present
ch. 3 The Priest as Parish Leader: A Contextual Analysis

Part II. Mission and Members of Theologate Communities
ch. 4 The Mission of Theologates
ch. 5 Students and Their Backgrounds: Religious, Intellectual, and Human
ch. 6 Board Members, Administrators, and Faculties

Part III. Formation Programs
ch. 7 Evolution and Development of Formation Programs
ch. 8 Human and Spiritual Formation in Theologates
ch. 9 Intellectual Formation
ch. 10 Pastoral Field Education

Part IV. The Future
ch. 11 Perceptions about Church and Ministry
ch. 12 Perceptions about Priesthood

Conclusion
Appendix A: Theologate Ownership and Operation
Bibliography
Index
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The Calling of Education

Book
Shils, Edward
1997
University of Chicago Press, Chicago, IL
LB2325.S439 1997
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
Throughout his long and prolific career, Edward Shils brought an extraordinary knowledge of academic institutions to discussions about higher education. The Calling of Education features Shils's most illuminating and incisive writing on this topic from the last twenty-five years of his life. The first essay, "The Academic Ethic," articulates the unique ethical demands of the academic profession and directs special attention to the integration of teaching and research. Other pieces, ...
Additional Info:
Throughout his long and prolific career, Edward Shils brought an extraordinary knowledge of academic institutions to discussions about higher education. The Calling of Education features Shils's most illuminating and incisive writing on this topic from the last twenty-five years of his life. The first essay, "The Academic Ethic," articulates the unique ethical demands of the academic profession and directs special attention to the integration of teaching and research. Other pieces, including Shils's renowned Jefferson lectures, focus on perennial issues in higher learning: the meaning of academic freedom, the connection between universities and the state, and the criteria for appointing individuals to academic positions.

Edward Shils understood the university as a great symphonic conductor comprehends the value of each instrument and section, both separately and in cooperation. The Calling of Education offers Shils's insightful perspective on problems that are no less pressing than when he first confronted them. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Introduction

ch. 1 The Academic Ethic
ch. 2 The Criteria of Academic Appointment
ch. 3 Do We Still Need Academic Freedom?
ch. 4 The Eighth Jefferson Lecture in the Humanities: "Render unto Caesar..." - Government, Society, and the Universities in Their Reciprocal Rights and Duties
ch. 5 The Idea of the University: Obstacles and Opportunities in Contemporary Societies
ch. 6 The Modern University and Liberal Democracy

Index
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Church-Affiliated Higher Education

Book
Stoltzfus, Victor
1992
Pinchpenny Press, Goshen, IN
LC428.S86 1992
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
Stoltzfus shows us the pressures on religious colleges towards assimilation into the mainstream, but also shows us the surprising strength of those colleges and the unique ways in which each acts to pass on the living tradition of its faith. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Stoltzfus shows us the pressures on religious colleges towards assimilation into the mainstream, but also shows us the surprising strength of those colleges and the unique ways in which each acts to pass on the living tradition of its faith. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Acknowledgments

ch. 1 Introduction, Purpose and Methods
ch. 2 A Review of the Literature
ch. 3 Presbyterian "PHI" College
ch. 4 Roman Catholic "BETA" College
ch. 5 Wesleyan "KAPPA" College
ch. 6 Findings
ch. 7 Future Possibilities in Church-Affiliated Higher Education

Appendix I. Author's Autobiographical Note
Appendix II. Governance in Mennonite Church Colleges
Appendix III. Research Instruments
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Taking Women Seriously: Lessons and Legacies for Educating the Majority

Book
Tidball, M. Elizabeth, Daryl G. Smith, Charles S. Tidball, Lisa E. Wolf-Wendel
1999
Oryx Press, Phoenix, AZ
LC1756.T26 1999
Topics: Teaching Diverse Students   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
Over the past 25 years, research findings have continued to underscore the direct and positive impact of women's colleges--institutions where the academic aspirations of women are the focus of the entire educational community. This book identifies the distinctive characteristics that make these colleges preeminent contributors of achieving women to the wider society. The authors also explain how the lessons and legacies of these institutions have the potential to enhance the education ...
Additional Info:
Over the past 25 years, research findings have continued to underscore the direct and positive impact of women's colleges--institutions where the academic aspirations of women are the focus of the entire educational community. This book identifies the distinctive characteristics that make these colleges preeminent contributors of achieving women to the wider society. The authors also explain how the lessons and legacies of these institutions have the potential to enhance the education environment at all colleges. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
List of Figures
List of Tables
Foreword
Acknowledgments
About the Authors
Introduction Writing History Differently
Pt. 1 Women's Colleges within the Context of American Higher Education
Pt. 2 Three Major Ways of Knowing Provide Lessons from Women's Colleges
Pt. 3 Legacies from Women's Colleges Serve As Institutional Models
Pt. 4 Women's Colleges and the Meaning of Taking Women Seriously
Additional Resources
Supplement to Ch. 1 Connecting with Global Issues
Supplement to Ch. 2 Tracking Frames of Reference
Supplement to Ch. 3 From Baccalaureate Origins to Institutional Productivity
Supplement to Ch. 4 Social Science Approaches to Studying College Impact
Supplement to Ch. 5 A Look Inside "A Look Inside"
References
Index
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Faith and Knowledge: Mainline Protestantism and American Higher Education

Book
Sloan, Douglas
1994
Westminster John Knox, Louisville, KY
LC383.S56 1994
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
Sloan explores the impact that the Protestant theological renaissance (1925-1960) had on American colleges and universities, focusing in particular on the church's most significant claim to have a continuing voice in higher education. He traces the role of the national ecumenical and denominational organizations, and studies the changing place of college chaplains. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Sloan explores the impact that the Protestant theological renaissance (1925-1960) had on American colleges and universities, focusing in particular on the church's most significant claim to have a continuing voice in higher education. He traces the role of the national ecumenical and denominational organizations, and studies the changing place of college chaplains. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Acknowledgments

ch. 1 The Church, the University, and the Faith-Knowledge Issue: The Background
ch. 2 The Church and the Crisis in the University
ch. 3 The Church Engages Higher Education: The Campaign Is Launched
ch. 4 The Theologians and the Two-Realm Theory of Truth
ch. 5 The Campaign Collapses: The Student Movement
ch. 6 Collapse and Rout: The Faculty
ch. 7 Protestantism and Its Postmodern Prospects: Some Reflections on the Present and Future

Index
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"The Four Cultures of the Academy"

Article
Bergquist, William H.
1992
Teaching Excellence 4, no. 7 (1992)
Topics: Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
In recent years, it has become increasing fashionable to describe organizations as cultures. Anthropologists, management consultants, organizational psychologists, and other social scientists have helped to popularize the notion that cultural analyses yield important insights about the life and dynamics of an organization. The purpose of this article is to explore this concept within the cultures of academia.
Additional Info:
In recent years, it has become increasing fashionable to describe organizations as cultures. Anthropologists, management consultants, organizational psychologists, and other social scientists have helped to popularize the notion that cultural analyses yield important insights about the life and dynamics of an organization. The purpose of this article is to explore this concept within the cultures of academia.
Article cover image

"Overcoming 'Hollowed' Collegiality"

Article
Massy, William F., Andrea Wilger and Carol Colbeck
1994
Change July/Aug (1994): 11-20
Topics: Faculty Well-Being   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
Discusses how departmental cultures inhibit or support effective undergraduate teaching. Isolation of individual faculty members due to fragmented communication patterns; Resource constraints; Inappropriate evaluation and reward systems; Characteristics of departments that support effective teaching; Collegial departmental processes; Collegiality and quality improvement.
Additional Info:
Discusses how departmental cultures inhibit or support effective undergraduate teaching. Isolation of individual faculty members due to fragmented communication patterns; Resource constraints; Inappropriate evaluation and reward systems; Characteristics of departments that support effective teaching; Collegial departmental processes; Collegiality and quality improvement.
Article cover image

"Changing Collegial Conversation"

Article
Frederick, Peter
1991
Department Advisor 6, no. 4 (1991): 1-5
Topics: Faculty Well-Being   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Article cover image

"Making a Place for the New American Scholar"

Article
Rice, Eugene R.
1996
American Association for Higher Education Working Paper Series, Inquiry No. 1 (1996)
Topics: Faculty Well-Being   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
This essay, the first in a series about the priorities of the professoriate, offers a vision of the new American scholar. The first part of the essay examines the numerous activities that surround faculty work and how they relate, in a changing external environment, to the role of the scholar. The stage is set by defining how higher education relates to the larger purposes of American society and by noting ...
Additional Info:
This essay, the first in a series about the priorities of the professoriate, offers a vision of the new American scholar. The first part of the essay examines the numerous activities that surround faculty work and how they relate, in a changing external environment, to the role of the scholar. The stage is set by defining how higher education relates to the larger purposes of American society and by noting the assumptions and consensus within which academic professionals have traditionally operated. The essay then examines how the contexts of faculty work are being transformed in the 1990s by financial constraints, the technological environment, and basic assumptions about work itself. The second part of the essay deals with how these changes affect and necessitate rethinking faculty careers. It discusses changes in the academic workplace, the shifting concept of scholarship, the interdependence of teaching and research, the relationship between personal and professional needs, interactive approaches to learning, working within a collaborative organization, the career implications of crossing knowledge domains and moving in and out of the academy, and tenure and alternative employment arrangements.
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The Soul of the American University: From Protestant Establishment to Established Nonbelief

Book
Marsden, George M.
1994
Oxford University Press, New York, NY
LA226.M34 1994
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
In this bold reexamination of the role of religion in higher education, Marsden provides a fascinating look at the histories of many pacesetting universities, including Harvard, Yale, and the University of California at Berkeley. The author argues for a new place for traditional religious perspectives in American universities. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
In this bold reexamination of the role of religion in higher education, Marsden provides a fascinating look at the histories of many pacesetting universities, including Harvard, Yale, and the University of California at Berkeley. The author argues for a new place for traditional religious perspectives in American universities. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction
Prologue (I): God and Buckley at Yale (1951)
Prologue (II): Henry Sloane Coffin's Yale (1897)
Prologue (III): A "Christian College"? The Yale of Noah Porter and William Graham Sumner (1879-1881

Pt. I The Establishment of Protestant Nonsectarianism
ch. 1 The Burden of Christendom: Seventeenth-Century Harvard
ch. 2 The New Queen of the Sciences and the New Republic
ch. 3 Two Kinds of Sectarianism
ch. 4 A Righteous Consensus, Whig Style

Pt. II Defining the American University in a Scientific Age
ch. 5 American Practicality and Germanic Ideals: Two Visions for Reform
ch. 6 The Christian Legacy in the Epoch of Science
ch. 7 Positive Christianity versus Positivism at Noah Porter's Yale
ch. 8 California: Revolution without Much Ideology
ch. 9 Methodological Secularization and Its Christian Rationale at Hopkins
ch. 10 Liberal Protestantism at Michigan: New England Intentions with Jeffersonian Results
ch. 11 Harvard and the Religion of Humanity
ch. 12 Holding the Line at Princeton
ch. 13 Making the World Safe from the Traditionalist Establishment
ch. 14 The Low-Church Idea of a University

Pt. III When the Tie No Longer Binds
ch. 15 The Trouble with the Old-Time Religion
ch. 16 The Elusive Ideal of Academic Freedom
ch. 17 The Fundamentalist Menace
ch. 18 The Obstacles to a Christian Presence
ch. 19 Outsiders
ch. 20 Searching for a Soul
ch. 21 A Church with the Soul of a Nation
ch. 22 Liberal Protestantism without Protestantism

Concluding Unscientific Postscript
Index
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Bright College Years: Inside the American Campus Today

Book
Matthews, Anne
1997
University of Chicago Press, Chicago, IL
LA228.M38 1997
Topics: Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
On one level, the world of higher education is still, as Matthews puts it, 'a chunk of the 20th century dropped live and squabbling on the threshold of the 21st.' But behind the stately trees and lovely towers a powerful hidden life has taken root, as academe is buffeted by the same economic and demographic forces that are drastically reshaping the rest of society. What's going on in there? ...
Additional Info:
On one level, the world of higher education is still, as Matthews puts it, 'a chunk of the 20th century dropped live and squabbling on the threshold of the 21st.' But behind the stately trees and lovely towers a powerful hidden life has taken root, as academe is buffeted by the same economic and demographic forces that are drastically reshaping the rest of society. What's going on in there? And while we're at it, what exactly, these days, is college for? Tracking and mapping the academic year, Matthews casts a searchlight in turn on those who learn, those who teach, and those who arrange, especially the makers and managers of money and image whose methods shape higher education more strongly every year. In the process, she goes behind the scenes at every type of school: enormous state universities like Texas or Arizona, where finding French class requires a map and a bus ticket; sleek country-club schools like Vanderbilt or USC, where student allowances can exceed faculty salaries; fiercely specialized colleges like Cal Tech, where students dream in computer languages; struggling trailer-house campuses like South Dakota's Sinte Gleska, the nation's first Native American university. Throughout, Matthews keeps in unsparing focus the conflicts between our competing images of what college is supposed to be: show business, rite of passage, profit machine, private planet, gateway to knowledge and power. Irreverent, engrossing, vastly entertaining, and intensely observed, Bright College Years is one veteran journalist's (and native daughter's) inside scoop on a beloved American institution in the grip of enormous change. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Summer - The Price of Passage
Fall - Dreaming in C
Fall Break - Through the Groves
Winter - Important Minds
Spring Break - Behind Closed Doors
Spring - The Imagekeepers
Summer - Eternity's Eye
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Methodism and Education 1849-1902: J.H. Rigg, Romanism, and Wesleyan Schools

Book
Smith, John T.
1998
Oxford University Press, New York, NY
LC577.S65 1998
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
This thorough history of the Wesleyan Methodist educational efforts in Victorian England discusses the influence of Dr. James Harrison Rigg, Principal of Westminster Training College, who dominated his church and who made friendships with senior politicians of the day. The book also Looks in depth at the influence of anti-Catholicism, which was rampant in the Methodist church of the era. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
This thorough history of the Wesleyan Methodist educational efforts in Victorian England discusses the influence of Dr. James Harrison Rigg, Principal of Westminster Training College, who dominated his church and who made friendships with senior politicians of the day. The book also Looks in depth at the influence of anti-Catholicism, which was rampant in the Methodist church of the era. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Abbreviations

ch. 1 Introduction: Methodism and Education before 1859
ch. 2 The Ascendancy of Dr. J. H. Rigg
ch. 3 The Wesleyans and the 1870 Education Act
ch. 4 The Wesleyan Church in the School Board Era, 1871-1875
ch. 5 The Wesleyans and the Sandon Education Act, 1874-1876
ch. 6 The Wesleyan Educational Decline, 1877-1885
ch. 7 The Wesleyans and the Cross Commission, 1885-1891
ch. 8 The Free Education Issue, 1884-1891
ch. 9 Dr. Rigg's Last Years of Influence, 1892-1902
ch. 10 What Manner of Man was James Harrison Rigg?

App. A Number of Wesleyan Schools and Scholars
App. B Statistics of the Committee of Council on Education
App. C Rate of Annual Grant per Scholar in Average Attendance
App. D J. H. Rigg's Placements
App. E Presidents of the Methodist Conference

Bibliography
Index
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Free Speech in the College Community

Book
O'Neil, Robert M.
1997
Indiana University Press, Bloomington, IN
LC72.2.O54 1997
Topics: Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
Illustrates problems with free speech encountered by today's college and university administrators with fictional cases based on real life incidents involving inflammatory speakers, hate e-mail, art, and the Internet, and suggests guidelines. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Illustrates problems with free speech encountered by today's college and university administrators with fictional cases based on real life incidents involving inflammatory speakers, hate e-mail, art, and the Internet, and suggests guidelines. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction

I Who Needs a Speech Code?
II The Outspoken University Professor
III Free Speech and New Technologies
IV The Constitution and the Off-Campus Speaker
V Gays, Greeks, and Others
VI Free Press on the College Campus
VII Artistic Freedom on Campus
VIII Academic Research and Academic Freedom
IX Religious Speech on the Public Campus
X Free Speech on the Private Campus
XI Postscript

Sources and References
Index
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Between Church and State

Book
Fraser, James W.
1999
St. Martin's Griffin, New York, NY
LC111.F68 1999
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
At the end of the twentieth century, the ongoing battle between religion and public education is once again a burning issue in the United States. In this book, James Fraser shows that though these battles have been going on for as long as there have been public schools, there has never been any consensus about the proper relationship between religion and public education. Looking at the most difficult question of ...
Additional Info:
At the end of the twentieth century, the ongoing battle between religion and public education is once again a burning issue in the United States. In this book, James Fraser shows that though these battles have been going on for as long as there have been public schools, there has never been any consensus about the proper relationship between religion and public education. Looking at the most difficult question of how private issues of faith can be reconciled with the very public nature of schooling, James Fraser paints a picture of our multicultural society that takes our relationship with God into account. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Introduction

ch. 1 From Holy Commonwealth to the Strange Compromise of 1789
ch. 2 Creating an American Common School and a Common Faith: Horace Mann and the Protestant Public Schools, 1789-1860
ch. 3 Who Defines What Is Common? Roman Catholics and the Common School Movement, 1801-1892
ch. 4 Literacy in the African American Community: Church and School in Slave and Free Communities, 1802-1902
ch. 5 Native American Religion, Christian Missionaries, and Government Schools, 1819-1926
ch. 6 Protestant, Catholic, Jew: Immigration and Nativism from the Blaine Amendment to the Scopes Trial, 1875-1925
ch. 7 Prayer, Bible Reading, and Federal Money: The Expanding Role of Congress and the Supreme Court, 1925-1968
ch. 8 Culture Wars, Creationism, and the Reagan Revolution, 1968-1990
ch. 9 Changing School Boards, Curriculum, and the Constitution, 1990-
ch. 10 What's Next? Prayers, Vouchers, and Creationism: The Battle for the Schools of the Twenty-First Century

Notes
For Further Reading
Index
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The Catholic University as Promise and Project: Reflections in a Jesuit Idiom

Book
Buckley, Michael J., S.J.
1998
Georgetown University Press, Washington, DC
LC501.B627 1998
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
The remarkable development of the Catholic university in the United States has raised questions about its continued identity, its promise, and its academic constituents. Michael J. Buckley, S.J., explores these issues, especially as they have been experienced in the history and contemporary commitments of Jesuit higher education. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
The remarkable development of the Catholic university in the United States has raised questions about its continued identity, its promise, and its academic constituents. Michael J. Buckley, S.J., explores these issues, especially as they have been experienced in the history and contemporary commitments of Jesuit higher education. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Acknowledgments

Pt. 1 Crisis, Choice, and the Catholic University
ch. 1 The Catholic University and the Promise Inherent in its Identity
ch. 2 The Church and its Responsibility to Foster Knowledge
ch. 3 A Conversation with a Friend

Pt. 2 "The Universities of the Society"
ch. 4 Ignatius' Understanding of the Jesuit University
ch. 5 Humanism and Jesuit Theology

Pt. 3 Contemporary Signs of Contradiction
ch. 6 The Search for a New Humanism: The University and the Concern for Justice
ch. 7 The Catholic University as Pluralistic Forum

Pt. 4 Towards the Love of Wisdom
ch. 8 Philosophic Grammar and the Other Disciplines
ch. 9 Wisdom, Religion, and the Liberal Arts: Towards the Construction of Theology

Notes
Index
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Rituals, Ceremonies, and Cultural Meaning in Higher Education

Book
Manning, Kathleen
2000
Bergin & Garvey, Westport, CT
LC191.9.M26 2000
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
College students and graduates have fond memories of campus events such as commencement, founder's days, convocations, and baccalaureate. These events, defined as rites of passage, secular ceremonies, or cultural performances, create a special feel to a campus remembered for years to come. Borrowing from interpretive anthropology, the author spotlights the following ideas: culture is revealed and forms of life are expressed through the actions and words of community members; human ...
Additional Info:
College students and graduates have fond memories of campus events such as commencement, founder's days, convocations, and baccalaureate. These events, defined as rites of passage, secular ceremonies, or cultural performances, create a special feel to a campus remembered for years to come. Borrowing from interpretive anthropology, the author spotlights the following ideas: culture is revealed and forms of life are expressed through the actions and words of community members; human communities are dynamic, complex, and ever-changing environments revealed through analysis of cultural events; and commonplace rituals and ceremonies play a central role in the cultural work of human meaning. The purpose of the book is to explore campus culture as revealed through rituals and ceremonies. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword

The Rituals of Higher Education
Presidential Inauguration
Rites of Passage: Structuralism
Charter Day
Secular Ceremonies: Action, Order, and Evocation
Second Semester Convocation
Structure, Communitas, and Liminality
Baccalaureate
Cultural Performances: Rehearsals and Informality
Junior Show
Messages, Meanings, and Root Paradigms
Mary Lyon's Birthday Celebration
Old Traditions in New Places: The Oxymoron of "New" Rituals
Alumnae Parade and Laurel Chain
Constructivist Inquiry and Higher Education Rituals

References
Index
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The University Gets Religion: Religious Studies in American Higher Education

Book
Hart, D.G.
1999
Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore, MD
BL41.H38 1999
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
In The University Gets Religion: Religious Studies in American Higher Education, historian D. G. Hart examines the rise of religion to its current place as one of the largest academic disciplines in contemporary higher education. Protestant ministers and faculty were especially influential in arguing for the importance of religion to a truly "liberal" education, staffing departments and designing curricula to reflect their own Protestant assumptions about the value of religion ...
Additional Info:
In The University Gets Religion: Religious Studies in American Higher Education, historian D. G. Hart examines the rise of religion to its current place as one of the largest academic disciplines in contemporary higher education. Protestant ministers and faculty were especially influential in arguing for the importance of religion to a truly "liberal" education, staffing departments and designing curricula to reflect their own Protestant assumptions about the value of religion not just for higher education but for American culture in general. Though many educators originally found religion too sectarian and unscientific for colleges and universities, religious studies nevertheless emerged after World War II as a crucial element of a liberal education.

But the success of mainstream Protestantism in fostering the academic study of religion has become the field's greatest burden. Over the last twenty-five years, religion scholars have distanced themselves from traditional Protestant orientations while looking for topics better suited to America's cultural diversity. As a result, religion is in the awkward position of being one of the largest scholarly disciplines while simultaneously lacking a solid academic justification. It may be time, Hart argues, for academics to stop trying to secure a religion-friendly university.

The first sustained history of the academic study of religion at American universities, The University Gets Religion: Religious Studies in American Higher Education is a timely book that explores the present-day implications of religious studies' Protestant past. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface and Acknowledgments
Introduction: Why Study Religion?

Part I: The Age of the University, 1870-1925
ch. 1 Enlightened Christianity and the Founding of the University
ch. 2 Protestant Divinity in the Shadow of the University
ch. 3 The Emergence of a Pattern

Part II: The Age of the Protestant Establishment, 1925-1965
ch. 4 Religious Studies and the Humanities
ch. 5 Finding a Place for Theology
ch. 6 The Good Book for Tough Times
ch. 7 Church History for the Nation

Part III: The Age of the American Academy of Religion, 1965-Present
ch. 8 Religious Studies and the Failure of the Christian Academy
ch. 9 Religious Studies in Post-Protestant America
ch. 10 Religious Studies, the Would-be Discipline

Conclusion: Whither Religion in the University?
Notes
Bibliographical Essay
Index
Article cover image

"Revitalizing Religion in the Academy"

Article
Mahoney, Kathleen A, John Schmalzbauer and James Youniss
Summary of the Evaluation of Lilly Endowment's Initiative on Religion & Higher Education, Chestnut Hill, MA
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
This report provides an evaluation of the research and conversations on religion and higher education that the Lilly Endowment has sponsored. Chief among the report's findings is the emergence of a movement to revitalize religion in higher education that gathered momentum in the 1990s.
Additional Info:
This report provides an evaluation of the research and conversations on religion and higher education that the Lilly Endowment has sponsored. Chief among the report's findings is the emergence of a movement to revitalize religion in higher education that gathered momentum in the 1990s.
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Coming of Age in Academe: Rekindling Women's Hopes and Reforming the Academy

Book
Martin, Jane Roland
2000
Routledge, New York, NY
Not catalogued
Topics: Diversifying the Faculty   |   Philosophy of Teaching   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
At what price entry? Philosopher of education Jane Roland Martin contends that feminist scholars have traded in their idealism for a place in the academy. In Coming of Age in Academe, she looks at the ways that academic feminists have become estranged from women.
Determining that this is the "membership fee" the academy exacts on all its members, she calls for the academy's transformation. Part one explores the chilly ...
Additional Info:
At what price entry? Philosopher of education Jane Roland Martin contends that feminist scholars have traded in their idealism for a place in the academy. In Coming of Age in Academe, she looks at the ways that academic feminists have become estranged from women.
Determining that this is the "membership fee" the academy exacts on all its members, she calls for the academy's transformation. Part one explores the chilly research climate for feminist scholars, the academic traps of essentialism and aerial distance, and the education gap in the feminist text. In part two, Martin likens the behavior of present-day feminist scholars to nineteenth-century immigrants to the United States and examines their assimilation into the world of work, politics and the professions. She finds that when you look at higher education, you see what a brutal filter of women it is. Part three highlights the academy's "brain drain" and its containment of women and then proposes actions both great and small that aim at fundamental change. In this rousing call to action, Martin concludes that the dissociation from women that the academy demands--its "entrance fee"--can only be stopped by radically reforming the gendered system on which the academy is based. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Acknowledgments
Preface
Pt. 1 What Price Women's Belonging?
Introduction
ch. 1 Estrangement from Each Other
ch. 2 Estrangement from Women's Lived Experience
ch. 3 Estrangement from "Women's" Occupations
Pt. 2 An Immigrant Interpretation
ch. 1 Women as Immigrants
ch. 2 The New Gender Tracking
ch. 3 Higher Education as Filter
ch. 4 Assimilation or Transformation, That Is the Question
Pt. 3 Add Women and Transform
ch. 1 The Brain Drain
ch. 2 Tales of Containment
ch. 3 Actions Great and Small
Conclusion
Notes
Works Cite
d Index
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The Sacred and The Secular University

Book
Roberts, Jon H. and James Turner
2000
Princeton University Press, Princeton, NJ
LA636.7.R62 2000
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
American higher education was transformed between the end of the Civil War and the beginning of World War I. During this period, U.S. colleges underwent fundamental changes--changes that helped to create the modern university we know today. Most significantly, the study of the sciences and the humanities effectively dissolved the Protestant framework of learning by introducing a new secularized curriculum. This secularization has long been recognized as a decisive ...
Additional Info:
American higher education was transformed between the end of the Civil War and the beginning of World War I. During this period, U.S. colleges underwent fundamental changes--changes that helped to create the modern university we know today. Most significantly, the study of the sciences and the humanities effectively dissolved the Protestant framework of learning by introducing a new secularized curriculum. This secularization has long been recognized as a decisive turning point in the history of American education. Until now, however, there has been remarkably little attention paid to the details of how this transformation came about. Here, at last, Jon Roberts and James Turner identify the forces and explain the events that reformed the college curriculum during this era.

The first section of the book examines how the study of science became detached from theological considerations. Previously, one of the primary pursuits of "natural scientists" was to achieve an understanding of the workings of the divine in earthly events. During the late nineteenth century, however, scientists reduced the scope of their inquiries to subjects that could be isolated, measured, and studied objectively. In pursuit of "scientific truth," they were drawn away from the larger "truths" that they had once sought. On a related path, social scientists began to pursue the study of human society more scientifically, attempting to generalize principles of behavior from empirically observed events.

The second section describes the revolution that occurred in the humanities, beginning in the mid-nineteenth century, when the study of humanities was largely the study of Greek and Latin. By 1900, however, the humanities were much more broadly construed, including such previously unstudied subjects as literature, philosophy, history, and art history. The "triumph of the humanities" represented a significant change in attitudes about what constituted academic knowledge and, therefore, what should be a part of the college curriculum.

The Sacred and the Secular University rewrites the history of higher education in the United States. It will interest all readers who are concerned about American universities and about how the content of a "college education" has changed over the course of the last century. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreward
Acknowledgements
Introduction by John F. Wilson

Part One: The Sciences
ch. 1 Religion, Science, and Higher Education
ch. 2 The Emergence of the Human Sciences
ch. 3 Knowledge and Inquiry in the Ascendant

Part Two: The Humanities
ch. 4 The Triumph of the Humanities
ch. 5 The Boon and Bane of Specialization
ch. 6 Two Ideals of Knowledge
ch. 7 For and against Secularization
Notes
Index
Cover image

Models for Christian Higher Education: Strategies for Success in the Twenty-First Century

Book
Hughes, Richard T. and William B. Adrian
1997
Eerdmans, Grand Rapids, MI
LC427 .M63 1997
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
This timely look at the state of Christian higher education in America contains descriptive, historical narratives that explore how fourteen Christian colleges and universities are successfully integrating faith and learning on their campuses despite the challenges posed by the increasingly pluralistic nature of modern culture. Written by respected representatives from seven major faith traditions - Roman Catholic, Lutheran, Reformed, Mennonite, Evangelical, Wesleyan/Holiness, and Baptist/Restorationist - these narratives are ...
Additional Info:
This timely look at the state of Christian higher education in America contains descriptive, historical narratives that explore how fourteen Christian colleges and universities are successfully integrating faith and learning on their campuses despite the challenges posed by the increasingly pluralistic nature of modern culture. Written by respected representatives from seven major faith traditions - Roman Catholic, Lutheran, Reformed, Mennonite, Evangelical, Wesleyan/Holiness, and Baptist/Restorationist - these narratives are also preceded by introductory essays that define the worldview and theological heritage of each given tradition and ask what that tradition can contribute to the task of higher education. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Introduction
What Can the Roman Catholic Tradition Contribute to Christian Higher Education?
Faith and Learning at the College of Saint Benedict and Saint John's University
The University of Portland: Center of Christian Humanism
What Can the Lutheran Tradition Contribute to Christian Higher Education?
Religious Vision and Academic Quest at St. Olaf College
Faith and Learning at California Lutheran University
What Can the Reformed Tradition Contribute to Christian Higher Education?
Piety and Progress: A History of Calvin College
Whitworth College: Evangelical in the Reformed Tradition
What Can the Mennonite Tradition Contribute to Christian Higher Education?
Goshen College and Its Church Relations: History and Reflections
Religious Idealism and Academic Vocation at Fresno Pacific College
What Can the Evangelical/Interdenominational Tradition Contribute to Christian Higher Education?
Faith and Learning at Wheaton College
Clarity through Ambiguity: Transforming Tensions at Seattle Pacific University
What Can the Wesleyan/Holiness Tradition Contribute to Christian Higher Education?
The History and Character of Messiah College, 1909-1995
Point Loma Nazarene College: Modernization in Christian Higher Education
What Can the Baptist Tradition Contribute to Christian Higher Education?
Christian Identity and Academic Rigor: The Case of Samford University
What Can the Church of Christ Tradition Contribute to Christian Higher Education?
Faith and Learning at Pepperdine University
The Christian University: Maintaining Distinctions in a Pluralistic Culture
Notes on Contributors
Article cover image

"Teaching and Learning in Higher Education, 1980-2000"

Article
Lazerson, Wagener and Shumanis
2000
Change May/Jun (2000): 13-19.
Topics: Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
This report examines the potential revolution in U.S. higher education public policies that require improved student learning. This revolution includes numerous teaching innovations activities that were initiated and sustained by external pressures and politically astute reformers. The report notes the criticism of U.S. elementary and secondary education and discusses how that criticism has spilled over into higher education. It examines reports which present the view that higher education ...
Additional Info:
This report examines the potential revolution in U.S. higher education public policies that require improved student learning. This revolution includes numerous teaching innovations activities that were initiated and sustained by external pressures and politically astute reformers. The report notes the criticism of U.S. elementary and secondary education and discusses how that criticism has spilled over into higher education. It examines reports which present the view that higher education is in deep need of reform. Faced with externally driven assessment and accountability movements, reformers have contended that the way to protect institutional autonomy from encroachment by external agencies is to focus on the importance of teaching and learning. Brief excerpts are presented from six voices of reform (Alexander Astin; Derek Bok and Richard Light; Ernest L. Boyer; K. Patricia Cross; and Lee Shulman) that highlight their vision of how to improve teaching and learning. Understanding that the assessment movement began as a drive for accountability at the national and state levels, rather than as local campus initiatives to improve teaching and learning, the paper offers insights on why major reform efforts were framed as demands that colleges and universities show better performance. The report concludes by examining the dilemmas that educational reformers face.
Article cover image

"The Opening of the Evangelical Mind"

Article
Wolfe, Alan
2000
The Atlantic Monthly 286, no. 4 (2000): 55-76.
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Identity, Society, and Church   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
Of all America's religious traditions, the author writes, evangelical Protestantism, at least in the twentieth-century conservative forms, has long ranked "dead last in intellectual stature." Now evangelical thinkers are trying to revitalize their tradition. Can they turn an intellectual backwater into an intellectual beacon?
Additional Info:
Of all America's religious traditions, the author writes, evangelical Protestantism, at least in the twentieth-century conservative forms, has long ranked "dead last in intellectual stature." Now evangelical thinkers are trying to revitalize their tradition. Can they turn an intellectual backwater into an intellectual beacon?
Cover image

True and False: Reports from a Study of Theological School Faculty

Journal Issue
Wheeler, Barbara G.
2000
Auburn Studies, No. 4 (Auburn Theological Seminary, New York, NY 1996)
BV4070.A8 A1 1996 no. 4
Topics: Theological Education   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
This first report of The Auburn Center's study of theological school faculty addresses four key issues which are central for understanding the current state of theological faculty: retirement and replacements, morale, women on theological faculties, and scholarship and church service. Bulletin No. 4 (January, 1996) of the Auburn Center's occasional research bulletin. Auburn Studies. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
This first report of The Auburn Center's study of theological school faculty addresses four key issues which are central for understanding the current state of theological faculty: retirement and replacements, morale, women on theological faculties, and scholarship and church service. Bulletin No. 4 (January, 1996) of the Auburn Center's occasional research bulletin. Auburn Studies. (From the Publisher)
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The Idea of a Catholic University

Book
O'Brien, George Dennis
2002
University of Chicago Press, Chicago, IL
LC487.O23 2002
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
George Bernard Shaw thought that a Catholic university was a contradiction in terms--"university" represents intellectual freedom and "Catholic" represents dogmatic belief. Scholars, university administrators, and even the Vatican have staked out positions debating Shaw's observation. In this refreshing book, George Dennis O'Brien argues that contradiction arises both from the secular university's limited concept of academic freedom and the church's defective notion of dogma. Truth is a central concept for ...
Additional Info:
George Bernard Shaw thought that a Catholic university was a contradiction in terms--"university" represents intellectual freedom and "Catholic" represents dogmatic belief. Scholars, university administrators, and even the Vatican have staked out positions debating Shaw's observation. In this refreshing book, George Dennis O'Brien argues that contradiction arises both from the secular university's limited concept of academic freedom and the church's defective notion of dogma. Truth is a central concept for both university and church, and O'Brien's book is built on the idea that there are different areas of truth--scientific, artistic, and religious--each with its own proper warrant and "method." In this light, he argues that one can reverse Shaw's comparison and uncover academic dogma and Christian freedom, university "infallibility" and dogmatic "fallibility."

Drawing on theology and the history of philosophy, O'Brien shows how religious truth relates to the work of a Catholic university. He then turns to the current controversies over Pope John Paul II's recent statement, Ex Corde Ecclesiae, which seeks to make Catholic universities conform to the church's official teaching office. O'Brien rejects the conventional "institutional-juridical" model used by the Vatican as improper both to faith and academic freedom. He argues for a "sacramental" model, one that respects the different kinds of "truth"--thus preserving the integrity of both church and university while making their combination in a Catholic university not only possible but desirable. O'Brien concludes with a practical consideration of how the ideal Catholic university might be expressed in the actual life of the contemporary curriculum and extracurriculum.

For anyone concerned about the place of religion in higher education, The Idea of a Catholic University will be essential reading. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction

ch. 1 Biblical Foundations of the Modern University
ch. 2 Science: The Truth of Universities
ch. 3 Art: Signatured Truth
ch. 4 Religion: Truth of Presence
ch. 5 "I Am the Truth"
ch. 6 Academic Dogma and Catholic Freedom
ch. 7 Fallible Church and Infallible Academy or Infallible Church and Fallible Academy
ch. 8 A Thought Experiment: A Holocaust University
ch. 9 Ex Corde Ecclesiae
ch. 10 Lex Orandi, Lex Credendi
ch. 11 A Contrarian University
ch. 12 Practical/Praxis Postscript

Notes
Index
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Study of Theological Education: 1989-1995 Evangelical Lutheran Church in America (pdf)

Journal Issue
2000
Theological Education 36, supp. (The Association of Theological Schools, Pittsburgh)
BV4019.T48v.36suppl.
Topics: Theological Education   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here:
Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here: http://www.ats.edu/uploads/resources/publications-presentations/theological-education/2000-theological-education-v36-sup.pdf

Table Of Content:
Study of Theological Education: 1989–1995
Evangelical Lutheran Church in America
Phyllis Anderson
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Called to Teach: The Vocation of the Presbyterian Educator

Book
Ferguson, Duncan S. and Weston William J., eds.
2003
Geneva Press, Louisville, KY
BX8917.C35 2003
Topics: Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
Presbyterian educators Duncan Ferguson and William Weston argue that the calling to teach in higher education is distinctively Reformed and a primary mission of the Presbyterian church. This collection of essays first lays the biblical, theological, and historical foundations for this calling, then explores how it is lived out today in educational institutions -- church-related as well as secular. Concluding that today's church must have the nurture of the teacher ...
Additional Info:
Presbyterian educators Duncan Ferguson and William Weston argue that the calling to teach in higher education is distinctively Reformed and a primary mission of the Presbyterian church. This collection of essays first lays the biblical, theological, and historical foundations for this calling, then explores how it is lived out today in educational institutions -- church-related as well as secular. Concluding that today's church must have the nurture of the teacher as a central part of its mission, Called to Teach will be a welcomed resource for all those who have the vocation of teaching. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Contributors
Introduction

ch. 1 The Dying Light and Glowing Embers of Presbyterian Higher Education (William Weston)
Section 1 The Calling to Teach: Foundations
ch. 2 The Biblical Foundations of Presbyterian Education (Darwin K. Glassford)
ch. 3 God, Creation, and Covenant: The Reformed Tradition and the Vocation of the Presbyterian Teacher (Timothy A. Beach-Verhey)
ch. 4 The Reformed Understanding of Vocation in History (R. Ward Holder and John Kuykendall)
Section 2 The Context of Teaching: Engagement
ch. 5 The American Presbyterian College (William Weston and Dale Soden)
ch. 6 Teaching in the Collegiate Institutions of the Church (Duncan S. Ferguson)
ch. 7 Teaching in the Theological Schools of the Church (W. Eugene March)
Section 3 Case Studies of Teaching: Application
ch. 8 The Vocation of Teaching in the Church-Related College Introduction (Margaret Cowan)
The Vocation of Teaching at Maryville College (Margaret Cowan)
Faith and Learning at Waynesburg College (Jeffrey Kisner)
Rhodes College: More than Historical (Stephen Haynes)
ch. 9 The Vocation of Teaching in Secular and Public Colleges and Universities (Iain S. Maclean and Cynthia Boyle)
ch. 10 Teaching and Learning in Presbyterian Theological Education Introduction (Edward C. (Ted) Zaragosa)
From the Exception to the Norm: Women in Seminaries and Ministry (Cynthia M. Campbell)
A Reformed Theological Perspective at Johnson C. Smith Theological Seminary (David M. Wallace)
Presbyterian Teaching at a United Methodist Seminary (Edward C. (Ted) Zaragoza)
ch. 11 The Dawning of the Light (Duncan S. Ferguson)
The Vocation of the Presbyterian Teacher: A Select Annotated Bibliography (Arlin C. Migliazzo)

Notes
References
Index of Scripture References
Index of Subjects and Names
Article cover image

"Knowledge and Teaching: Foundations of the New Reform"

Article
Shulman, Lee S.
1987
Harvard Educational Review 57, no. 1 (1987): 1-22
Topics: General Overviews   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
The author builds his foundation for teaching reform on an idea of teaching that emphasizes comprehension and reasoning, transformation and reflection. He discusses (1) sources of teaching knowledge, (2) conceptualizations of these sources, (3) processes of pedagogical reasoning and action, and (4) implications for teaching policy and educational reform.
Additional Info:
The author builds his foundation for teaching reform on an idea of teaching that emphasizes comprehension and reasoning, transformation and reflection. He discusses (1) sources of teaching knowledge, (2) conceptualizations of these sources, (3) processes of pedagogical reasoning and action, and (4) implications for teaching policy and educational reform.
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Christian Higher Education Volume 2 Number 1

Book
2003
Taylor & Francis
LC368.C46v.2no.1
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
Journal Issue
Additional Info:
Journal Issue

Table Of Content:
ch.1 CHALLENGES TO CHRISTIAN HIGHER EDUCATION IN ASIA
ch. 2 CHRISTIAN UNIVERSITIES IN HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVE
ch. 3 CHALLENGES TO CHRISTIAN HIGHER EDUCATION IN ASIA: PERSPECTIVES OF A UNIVERSITY PRESIDENT
ch. 4 RELIGIOUS STUDIES IN CHRISTIAN UNIVERSITIES IN CONTEMPORARY ASIA: ITS RELATIONSHIP TO CHRISTIAN THEOLOGY
ch. 5 AN APPRECIATIVE INQUIRY INTO THE SPIRITUAL VALUES OF CHRISTIAN HIGHER EDUCATION

BOOK REVIEWS
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John Henry Newman and His Idea of a University -- Christian Higher Education Volume 2 Number 3

Journal Issue
Adrian, William ed.
2003
Christian Higher Education Volume 2 Number 3
LC368.C46v.2no.3
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
John Henry Newman and His Idea of a University

Guest Editor's Introduction (William Adrian)

Newman's Idea of a University Makes Sense Today (Jose Morales Marin)

Newman and Pattison: The Predicament of a Secularized University (Kazuhiko Funakawa)

Newman's Idea and Chung Chi's Practice (Peter Tze Ming Ng, and Pan-chiu Lai)

Newman's Challenge to the Contemporary Academy (Stephen M. Fields)

The Craft of Teaching: The Relevance of Newman for Theological Education (Frederick D. Aquino)

Newman: A Proposal for Lifelong Education (Rosario Athie)

Far from Home: Newman and the Contemporary Liberal Arts College (Thomas L. Benson)
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Navigating The Currents Of Certification: A Case Study Of Hispanic Baptist Theological School

Journal Issue
2004
Christian Higher Education Volume 3 Number 1
LC368.C46v.3no.1
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 NAVIGATING THE CURRENTS OF CERTIFICATION: A CASE STUDY OF HISPANIC BAPTIST THEOLOGICAL SCHOOL

ch. 2 INSTITUTIONAL TYPES, ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURES, AND INNOVATION IN CHRISTIAN COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES

ch. 3 DIAPERS, DISSERTATIONS, AND OTHER HOLY THINGS: THE EXPERIENCES OF MOTHERS WORKING IN CHRISTIAN COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES

ch. 4 SPIRITUAL PERSPECTIVE AND NEEDS: A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF NURSING FACULTY IN A CHRISTIAN UNIVERSITY AND A STATE UNIVERSITY

ch. 5 PERSONAL AND ACADEMIC BACKGROUNDS OF FEMALE CHIEF ACADEMIC OFFICERS in EVANGELICAL CHRISTIAN COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES
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A Symposium: Knowledge Workers and Unions in the 21st Century

Book
Lehane, Con, ed.
1999
Thought and Action XV, no. 2 (National Education Association, Washington, DC 1999)
LA227.4 .T48 1999
Topics: Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
Additional Info:


Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Knowledge workers - trade unionism's new frontier (Charles Kerchner)
ch. 2 History, women's work, and the new unionism (Dorothy Sue Cobble)
ch. 3 Entertainment unions and higher education (Lois Gray)

Quality in instruction
ch. 4 Adapting to a new generation of college students (Richard C. Turner)
ch. 5 Learning to read and write : still a miracle (Norma Tilden)
ch. 6 Keeping wonder alive in today's college classroom (Elizabeth Ann Bartlett)
ch. 7 Trust, but verify - toward fairer student evaluations (John Daley)

Issues in the profession
ch. 8 Fear of the self in American academic life (Enid Bloch)
ch. 9 Fighting the culture wars in academia (James Fisher)
ch. 10 Bargaining for the future at Cal State (Terry Jones)
ch. 11 Tenure at Minnesota : a postmortem (Bud McClure)
ch. 12 Distance education : assessing costs and benefits (David Garson)
ch. 13 University senates and the law : a case study (Alan W. Clarke and Laurie Anne Whitt)
ch. 14 Faculty of color and traditional notions of service (Benjamin Baez)
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Being There: Culture and Formation in Two Theological Schools

Book
Carroll, Jackson W., Barbara G. Wheeler, Daniel O. Aleshire, and Penny Long Marler
1997
Oxford University Press, New York, NY
BV4030.B45 1997
Topics: Theological Education   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
This book offers a close-up look at theological education in the United States today. The authors' goal is to understand the ways in which institutional culture affects the outcome of the educational process. To that end they undertake ethnographic studies of two seminaries - one evangelical and one mainline Protestant. These studies, written in a lively journalistic style, make up the first part of the book and offer fascinating portraits ...
Additional Info:
This book offers a close-up look at theological education in the United States today. The authors' goal is to understand the ways in which institutional culture affects the outcome of the educational process. To that end they undertake ethnographic studies of two seminaries - one evangelical and one mainline Protestant. These studies, written in a lively journalistic style, make up the first part of the book and offer fascinating portraits of two very different intellectual, religious, and social worlds. The authors then go on to examine these disparate environments and suggest how, in each case, school culture acts as an agent of educational change. This unique and practical study should be of great interest to both students and scholars of American religion, to theological educators, and to educators generally. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction

Pt. I Two Theological Schools
Evangelical Theological Seminary
ch. 1 The Message
ch. 2 Variations
ch. 3 Evangelical Culture
ch. 4 Contests
ch. 5 Students
ch. 6 Covenant House
Mainline Theological Seminary
ch. 7 Year One: Encounters
ch. 8 Year Two: Working Things Out
ch. 9 Year Three: Resolutions

Pt. II Culture and Educational Formation
ch. 10 Elements of Educational Culture
ch. 11 The Process of Education and Formation
ch. 12 Culture and Formation: Theoretical Perspectives
ch. 13 Culture and Educational Practice: A Concluding Unscientific Postscript

Notes
References
Index
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Conceiving the Christian College: A College President Shares His Vision of Christian Higher Education

Book
Liftin, Duane
2004
Eerdmans, Grand Rapids, MI
LC383.L58 2004
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
This book is designed to help those who are interested in Christian higher education explore anew the unique features, opportunities, and contemporary challenges of one distinct type of educational institution - the Christian college. What distinguishes Conceiving the Christian College from the many other books on this subject is its incisive discussion of a set of crucial ideas widely misunderstood in the world of Christian higher education. Now serving in ...
Additional Info:
This book is designed to help those who are interested in Christian higher education explore anew the unique features, opportunities, and contemporary challenges of one distinct type of educational institution - the Christian college. What distinguishes Conceiving the Christian College from the many other books on this subject is its incisive discussion of a set of crucial ideas widely misunderstood in the world of Christian higher education. Now serving in his eleventh year as president of one of the nation's foremost Christian colleges, Duane Litfin is well placed to ask pressing questions regarding faith-based education. What is unique about Christian colleges? What is required to sustain them? How do they maintain their bearing in the tumultuous intellectual seas of the twenty-first century? Litfin's themes are large, but they are meant to refocus the conceptual challenges to Christian education in ways that will strengthen both the academic environment of today's Christian colleges and their impact on culture at large. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Introduction
ch. 2 Two academic models
Challenge : to understand more clearly our own identity
ch. 3 The centerpiece
Challenge : to see more fully whom we serve
ch. 4 A centered education
Challenge : to keep the center at the center
ch. 5 It's all God's truth
Challenge : to strengthen the foundations of Christian thought
ch. 6 A balanced epistemology
Challenge : to preserve the idea of truth
ch. 7 Integrative thinking : prolegomena
Challenge : to understand the integrative mandate
ch. 8 Doing integration
Challenge : to sustain our commitment to the integrative task
ch. 9 Faith and learning
Challenge : to reinforce our commitment to revealed truth
ch. 10 The voluntary principle
Challenge : to reconcile institutional commitments with individual freedoms
ch. 11 Institutional breadth
Challenge : to appreciate our institutional uniqueness
ch. 12 Our place in the academy
Challenge : to engender a more congenial academic environment
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Higher Education for the Public Good: Emerging Voices from a National Movement

Book
Kezar, Adrianna J., Tony C. Chambers, John C. Burkhardt, and Associates, eds.
2005
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LC191.94.H54 2005
Topics: Philosophy of Teaching   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
This important resource describes how higher education contributes to the public good and offers suggestions for how leaders can enhance their contribution through new policies and practices. Higher Education for the Public Good draws on the experiences of individuals and groups from a wide-variety of campuses throughout the country. The information was gathered at various dialogues hosted by the Kellogg Forum on Higher Education for the Public Good. In addition ...
Additional Info:
This important resource describes how higher education contributes to the public good and offers suggestions for how leaders can enhance their contribution through new policies and practices. Higher Education for the Public Good draws on the experiences of individuals and groups from a wide-variety of campuses throughout the country. The information was gathered at various dialogues hosted by the Kellogg Forum on Higher Education for the Public Good. In addition the book suggest ways that leaders can constructively engage in a debate about the pubic good with the public, legislators, and among institutional members of high education. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
About the Authors

Part One: Exploring the Public Good
ch. 1 The Special Role of Higher Education in Society: As a Public Good for the Public Good (Tony C. Chambers)
ch. 2 Challenges for Higher Education in Serving the Public Good (Adrianna J. Kezar)
ch. 3 Creating a Metamovement: A Vision Toward Regaining the Public Social Charter (Adrianna J. Kezar)

Part Two: Public Policy and the Public Good
ch. 4 State Governance and the Public Good (David Longanecker)
ch. 5 Listening to the Public: A New Agenda for Higher Education? (David Mathews)
ch. 6 Trusteeship and the Public Good (Richard Novak, Susan Whealler Johnston)
ch. 7 The Public Good and a Racially Diverse Democracy (Denise O'Neil Green, William T. Trent)

Part Three: Cross-Sector Issues and the Public Good.
ch. 8 Liberal Education and the Civic Engagement Gap (Carol Geary Schneider)
ch. 9 The Disciplines and the Public Good (Edward Zlotkowski)
ch. 10 Scholarship for the Public Good: Living in Pasteur's Quadrant (Judith A. Ramaley)

Part Four: Institutional Governance and Leadership for the Public Good
ch. 11 Integrating a Commitment to the Public Good into the Institutional Fabric (Lee Benson, Ira Harkavy, Matthew Hartley)
ch. 12 Rethinking Faculty Roles and Rewards for the Public Good (Kelly Ward)
ch. 13 Institutional Differences in Pursuing the Public Good (Barbara A. Holland)

Part Five: Individual Leadership for the Public Good
ch. 14 Leading the Engaged Institution (James C. Votruba)
ch. 15 Preparing Doctoral Students for Faculty Careers That Contribute to the Public Good (Ann Austin, Benita J. Barnes)
ch. 16 Let Us Speak: Including Students' Voices in the Public Good of Higher Education (Stephen John Quaye)
ch. 17 Presidential Leadership for the Public Good (Martha W. Gilliland)

Part Six: Concluding Thoughts on the Public Good
ch. 18 Creating Dialogue: A New Charter and Vision of the Public Good (Adrianna J. Kezar)
ch. 19 Pondering the Social Charter: Critical Reflection for Leaders (Tony C. Chambers)

Name Index
Subject Index
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The Gathering Storm: The Educational Debt of Theological Students

Journal Issue
Ruger, Anthony, Sharon L. Miller, and Kim Maphis Early
2005
Auburn Studies No. 12 (Auburn Theological Seminary, New York, NY)
BV4070.A8 A1 2005 no. 12
Topics: Theological Education   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
This issue on the educational debt of theological students revisits a topic first studied ten years ago by the Auburn Center for the Study of Theological Education. The 1995 report found that debt was indeed becoming a problem for a significant, although small, proportion of students. A majority of students now carry educational debt, and they are borrowing larger amounts than in the past. As a result, many theological school graduates ...
Additional Info:
This issue on the educational debt of theological students revisits a topic first studied ten years ago by the Auburn Center for the Study of Theological Education. The 1995 report found that debt was indeed becoming a problem for a significant, although small, proportion of students. A majority of students now carry educational debt, and they are borrowing larger amounts than in the past. As a result, many theological school graduates report that their level of debt is affecting their career choices, holding them back from purchasing homes, preventing them from saving for their children’s education, limiting their retirement savings, causing them to delay health care needs, and creating stress in their personal and professional lives. Some students, schools, denominations and congregations have, in response to the signs of impending trouble, found ways to keep debt under control. All resources of the church—educational, institutional, theological, financial—need to be brought to bear to avoid the gathering storm of debt that threatens the next generation of clergy and lay church professionals. (From the Publisher)
Article cover image

"The Christian College Experience and the Development of Spirituality Among Students"

Article
Ma, Stella Y.
2003
Christian Higher Education 2, no. 4 (2003): 321-339
Topics: Faith in the Classroom   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
This study investigated the impact of the Christian college educational environment, both academic and nonacademic, on student spirituality. Nine hundred fifty-three self-reported surveys, representing 18 U.S. Christian colleges and universities, were used. The typical respondent was female, Caucasian, and a resident upperclassman. For the purposes of this exploratory study, spirituality was operationally defined as “spiritual formation,” referring to one’s growth towards spiritual maturity, which is reflected in one’s ...
Additional Info:
This study investigated the impact of the Christian college educational environment, both academic and nonacademic, on student spirituality. Nine hundred fifty-three self-reported surveys, representing 18 U.S. Christian colleges and universities, were used. The typical respondent was female, Caucasian, and a resident upperclassman. For the purposes of this exploratory study, spirituality was operationally defined as “spiritual formation,” referring to one’s growth towards spiritual maturity, which is reflected in one’s relationships with God, self, and others. Findings reveal interesting trends about factors associated with spirituality on campus, and relate student perceptions of spirituality and the Christian college experience. Results indicate that students perceived many factors of their Christian college experience as positive. In particular, the nonacademic aspects of college life were perceived to be more influential on spiritual formation than the academic. For example, students rated their peer relationships as being most significant to their spiritual growth. Results also illustrate demographic differences in perceptions of the various aspects of the Christian college experience. Practical applications suggest assessing the existing range of college academic and nonacademic offerings and training for faculty development in class assessments. Other applications include providing programs for students experiencing emotional crises or pain. Recommendations for further research include studying other factors such as sports, counseling services, church involvement, family support, maturation factors, and the impact of computers. Research may also benefit from focusing on certain survey items more specifically, such as various kinds of peer relationships and cultural diversity. (From the Publisher)
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The Christian College: A History of Protestant Higher Education in America, 2nd Edition

Book
Ringenberg, William C.
2006
Baker Books, Grand Rapids, MI
LC621.R56 2006
Topics: Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
When it first appeared in 1984 The Christian College was the first modern comprehensive history of Protestant higher education in America. Now this second edition updates the history, featuring a new chapter on the developments of the past two decades, a major introduction by Mark Noll, a new preface and epilogue, and a series of instructive appendices. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
When it first appeared in 1984 The Christian College was the first modern comprehensive history of Protestant higher education in America. Now this second edition updates the history, featuring a new chapter on the developments of the past two decades, a major introduction by Mark Noll, a new preface and epilogue, and a series of instructive appendices. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction : the Christian colleges and American intellectual traditions

ch. 1 The colonial period
ch. 2 The old-time college
ch. 3 New colleges and new programs
ch. 4 The movement toward secularization
ch. 5 The response to secularization
ch. 6 The reconstruction of Christian higher education after 1945
ch. 7 On to the twenty-first century
TTR cover image

"Pedagogy and Practice: Using Wisdom Ways in the Classroom"

TTR
Fiorenza, Elisabeth Schüssler
2003
Teaching Theology and Religion 6, no. 4 (2003): 208-210
BL41.T4
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
The Academic Teaching and Biblical Studies Section of the Society of Biblical Literature chose Wisdom Ways, by Elisabeth Schüssler Fiorenza, as the basis for a discussion on teaching at its November 1902 meeting in Toronto. Each presenter commented on the underlying pedagogy of the book, sharing exercises and assignments they had used in their classrooms to help students interpret the materials, especially from a feminist and/or liberationist perspective. Adapted ...
Additional Info:
The Academic Teaching and Biblical Studies Section of the Society of Biblical Literature chose Wisdom Ways, by Elisabeth Schüssler Fiorenza, as the basis for a discussion on teaching at its November 1902 meeting in Toronto. Each presenter commented on the underlying pedagogy of the book, sharing exercises and assignments they had used in their classrooms to help students interpret the materials, especially from a feminist and/or liberationist perspective. Adapted from the SBL presentations, this is a different type of review essay that describes the use of a book in three different settings: a free-standing seminary, a state university, and a university-affiliated divinity school. These three distinct contexts are in turn the settings for three individual pedagogical styles. The result is a conversation among author, teachers, text, and students that illustrates the interplay of teaching, learning, and context.
TTR cover image

"Writing Cultures, Enculturating Writing at Two Theological Schools: Mapping Rhetorics of Correlation and Liberation"

TTR
Yaghjian, Lucretia B.
2002
Teaching Theology and Religion 5, no. 3 (2002): 128-140
BL41.T4
Topics: Teaching Writing   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
Taking the theory and practice of contrastive rhetoric as a point of departure, this article identifies two rhetorical models that inform the teaching and writing of theology at two theological schools where the author directs a joint writing program. The models of correlation and liberation are drawn from the official documents and typical theological/rhetorical practices of each school, exemplified by representative student and faculty writing. In conclusion, the common ...
Additional Info:
Taking the theory and practice of contrastive rhetoric as a point of departure, this article identifies two rhetorical models that inform the teaching and writing of theology at two theological schools where the author directs a joint writing program. The models of correlation and liberation are drawn from the official documents and typical theological/rhetorical practices of each school, exemplified by representative student and faculty writing. In conclusion, the common ground encouraging comparative and cooperative models of writing theological culture(s) is intimated by four concluding motives that warrant wider disciplinary discussion of the rhetorics we have and those we need as religious scholars and theological educators at the beginning of the third millennium.
TTR cover image

"The Vocation of Teaching: Themes and Models from the Presbyterian Tradition"

TTR
Cowan, Margaret P., Roger P. Ebertz & Mary E. Shiels
2002
Teaching Theology and Religion 5, no. 3 (2002): 141-148
BL41.T4
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
Historically, the Presbyterian/Reformed tradition has placed a heavy emphasis on education and has honored teaching as an important vocation. This paper begins to explore insights and models that tradition offers to help teachers clarify their calling. The article discusses five themes in Reformed theology and how these themes play out in an educational context, providing examples from one Presbyterian college. The paper concludes by suggesting four ways to think ...
Additional Info:
Historically, the Presbyterian/Reformed tradition has placed a heavy emphasis on education and has honored teaching as an important vocation. This paper begins to explore insights and models that tradition offers to help teachers clarify their calling. The article discusses five themes in Reformed theology and how these themes play out in an educational context, providing examples from one Presbyterian college. The paper concludes by suggesting four ways to think about pedagogy in Presbyterian institutions that are both consistent with Reformed principles and practical in their relevance to teaching and learning.
Journal cover image

Models of Theological Education for the Last Third of the Twentieth Century

Journal Issue
1965
Theological Education 1, no. 2 (The Association of Theological Schools, Pittsburgh)
Topics: Theological Education   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
Postscript to Chapter Five of 'Only One Way Left' (George F. MacLeod)
The Seminary Provides for Dialogue (Franklin H. Littell)
A Model for Theological Education (Walter D. Wagoner)
A Tertium Quid: The Church’s Seminary and the University (Ernest Cadman Colwell)
The Location of Theological Schools (Charles L. Taylor)
An Emerging Community of Theological Study (W. S. Taylor)
Report:
Autumn Enrollment in Theological Schools
Members of AATS
Faculty Business:
Document 1—Principals of Student Financial Aid
Document 2—Guidelines for Recruitment
Notes to:
Administrators (Charles L. Taylor)
Trustees (Walter N. Roberts)
Seminary Staff Officers (Randolf H. Dyer)
Librarians (Charles P. Johnson)
Professors (Jesse H. Ziegler)
Journal cover image

The Purpose of a Theological School

Journal Issue
1966
Theological Education 2, no. 2 (The Association of Theological Schools, Pittsburgh)
Topics: Theological Education   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
The Evolution of Purpose in American Theological Education (Elwyn A. Smith)
The Purpose of Theological Schools in Great Britain (Kenneth J. Woollcombe)
The Purpose of the Theological Faculties of Continental Universities Heinz Eduard Todt)
Patterns of Ministry and the Purpose of a Theological School Steven G. Mackie)
What a Protestant Church Wants Its Seminaries to Be and to Do (Walter F. Wolbrecht)
Objective of the Roman Catholic Seminary (James Michael Lee)
The Problem of Purpose in the Theological University (Robert T. Handy)
Salaries in AATS Schools: A Biennial Report (Jesse H. Ziegler and Aute L. Carr)
Notes to:
Administrators (Duke K. McCall)
Trustees (Walter W. Grosser)
Seminary Staff Officers (Elinor Bunn Thompson)
Librarians (Roland E. Kircher)
Professors (Jesse H. Ziegler)
Lecturer Clearinghouse (Aute L. Carr)
The AATS Faculty Fellowship Program
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Theological Curriculum for the 1970s

Journal Issue
1968
Theological Education 4, no. 3 (The Association of Theological Schools, Pittsburgh)
Topics: Theological Education   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
I. Part I: Theological Education at Level II
A. Introduction
B. Entrance and Graduation Requirements
C. Orientation
D. The Core of the Curriculum
E. The Historical and Theoretical Resources for Theological Instruction
F. Common Life
G. Personnel
H. Physical Facilities
II. Part II: Theological Education at Level IIIA
A. Introduction
B. Relation of the Centers to the Level II Nuclei
C. Types of Centers
D. Areas of Instruction and Field Experience
E. The Education Process
F. Faculty, Administration, and Student Body
G. Physical Facilities and Cost Estimates
H. Application of Level IIIA Model Theory to Three Types of Centers
1. Family Life Cycle Center
2. Center for Business and Industrial Ministry
3. A Center in Theology and the Arts
III. Part III: Theological Education at Level IIIB
A. Introduction
B. The Academy Residency
C. Doctoral Programs
IV. Appendices
A. Organizational Chart for Cluster, Nucleus, and Centers
B. Job Descriptions for Organizational Chart
C. Distribution of Faculty within a Nucleus by Fields
D. Personnel for Orientation Programs
E. Continuum of Types of IIA Centers
F. Description of Metropolitan Intern Program
G. Description of Intensive Course in Christian Existence
V. Planning for the Future: A Key Question
Jeral C. Brauer
VI. A Response
Edward F. Malone
Notes to:
Administrators—Gordon E. Jackson
Trustees—George T. Peters
Seminary Staff Officers—Milton May
Professors—David S. Schuller
Librarians—Calvin Klemt
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From Those Who Teach and Minister A Special Report from The Fund for Theological Education, Inc.

Journal Issue
Rooks, Charles Shelby and W. Robert Martin, Jr., eds.
1973
Theological Education 9, no. 4, supp. (The Association of Theological Schools, Pittsburgh)
Topics: Theological Education   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
Some Reflections on My Ministry (Almus M. Thorp, Jr.)
A Ministry of Hope from a Double Minority (James A. Forbes, Jr.)
The Discovery of Self and Ministry (Richard Erikson)
Seminary Teaching and the Ministry Today (Catherine L. Gunsalus)
To Seize the Times (Lawrence N. Jones)
The Significance of the Fund for Theological Education (Charles Shelby Rooks)
Genuine Interest and a New Vitality (W. Robert Martin, Jr.)
Journal cover image

Trends in Canadian and American Theological Education, 1880–1980: Some Comparisons

Journal Issue
1982
Theological Education 18, no. 2 (The Association of Theological Schools, Pittsburgh)
Topics: Theological Education   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
Trends in Canadian and American Theological Education, 1880–1980: Some Comparisons (Robert T. Handy)
Responses: (Lloyd Gesner; John Webster Grant; William E. Hordern; George A. Rawlyk; and Laurence K. Shook)
Journal cover image

Globalizing Theological Education in North America

Journal Issue
1986
Theological Education 22, no. 2 (The Association of Theological Schools, Pittsburgh)
Topics: Theological Education   |   Changes in Higher Education   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
I. The Globalization of Theological Education: Setting the Task (Donald W. Shriver, Jr.)
II. Globalization in Theological Education: Summary and Analysis of Survey Data David S. Schuller)
III. Case Descriptions:
A. The Atlanta Theological Association (Erskine Clarke)
B. School of Theology at Claremont (Joseph C. Hough, Jr.)
C. Denver Conservative Baptist Seminary (Ralph R. Covell)
D. Fuller Theological Seminary (Paul E. Peirson)
E. Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary (J. Christy Wilson, Jr.)
F. Harvard Divinity School (Jane I. Smith)
G. Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago (David L. Lindberg)
H. Princeton Theological Seminary (Samuel Hugh Moffett)
I. St. Vincent de Paul Regional Seminary (Pilar Aurensanz)
J. Seventh-day Adventist Theological Seminary (Russell Staples and Madeline Johnston)
K. Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary (Justice C. Anderson)
L. Toronto School of Theology (Cyril Powles)
M. Union Theological Seminary, New York City (Kosuke Koyama)
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PART I: Reflections on the Literature on Theological Education Published Between 1955 and 1985 PART II: Thinking Theologically about Theological Education

Journal Issue
1988
Theological Education 24, supp. 2 (The Association of Theological Schools, Pittsburgh)
Topics: Theological Education   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
Editorial Introduction (Robert Wood Lynn)
Reflections on the Literature on Theological Education Published Between 1955–1985 (James M. Gustafson)
Introduction
Section One: Aspects and Contexts of Theological Education Addressed in the Literature
Section Two: Analysis of Perspectives in the Literature
Section Three: Thematic Reflections
Appendix: The Opportunities of a University Related Divinity School Bibliography
Thinking Theologically About Theological Education (Francis Schussler Fiorenza)
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The Passionate Intellect: Incarnational Humanism and the Future of University Education

Book
Klassen, Norman and Jens Zimmermann
2006
Baker Academic, Grand Rapids, MI
LC1011.K58 2006
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
Chronicles the development of the intellectual culture of the Western university and proposes an approach to university education that keeps faith with central Christian doctrines. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Chronicles the development of the intellectual culture of the Western university and proposes an approach to university education that keeps faith with central Christian doctrines. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Can Christians think?
ch. 2 A holistic beginning : medieval humanism
ch. 3 Letter and spirit : literary humanism
ch. 4 Secular scientific humanism
ch. 5 Dare to think! Enlightenment humanism and dualism
ch. 6 The birth of the humanities : Giambattista Vico's critique of the enlightenment
ch. 7 Non-Christian criticism of enlightenment humanism
ch. 8 Postmodern humanism
ch. 9 Postmodern antihumanism and the university
ch. 10 Incarnational humanism
ch. 11 Incarnational humanism and common grace
ch. 12 Conclusion
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The Concept of a University

Book
Minogue, Kenneth
2006
Transaction Publishers, New Brunswick, NJ
LB2322.M56 2005
Topics: Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
Taking on the challenge of the postmodernists of politics, Kenneth Minogue argues forcefully and persuasively that the current dominant philosophies of education rest upon a mistake. The fashionable belief that the university is society's handmaiden is confronted by a view of the university as an institution with an independent vitality and function. Minogue at one and the same time reminds us of the sources of admiration for university life in ...
Additional Info:
Taking on the challenge of the postmodernists of politics, Kenneth Minogue argues forcefully and persuasively that the current dominant philosophies of education rest upon a mistake. The fashionable belief that the university is society's handmaiden is confronted by a view of the university as an institution with an independent vitality and function. Minogue at one and the same time reminds us of the sources of admiration for university life in the medieval world, and how it rested squarely on its essential autonomy from the very social pressures that have come to define the modern university.
The Concept of a University traces many confusions imposed by political ideology to a failure to distinguish academic inquiry from other kinds of intellectual activity, such as journalism, religious proselytizing, and high quality propaganda. Minogue holds that where the university lacks a clear sense of the difference between the academic and the pragmatic, its vitality is sapped by conflicting purposes.
Much of the present debate about th crisis in universities rests upon a fundamental error of trying to fit them into some scheme of social functions. Minogue's analysis breaks through much muddled thinking on this subject, presenting instead a coherent, relevant, and stimulating approach to higher education.
In a new introduction, Minogue tells us "we have become frightfully tolerant. Anyone can become anything, and we all belong to the one practical world of churning problems and solutions. There is no doubt that a new world is being born. It seems to be a world that will have little place for the disintegrated pursuit of truth. A great deal of old fashioned scholarship survives--partly by 'silence, cunning, and exile'--in the 'universities' of the present day, but little relationship remains between what we used to call 'universities' and the things called by that name today." (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction to the Transaction Edition
Introduction: Of Heels and Hammers

Part One: The Problem of Identification
ch. 1 The Beginning of Universities
ch. 2 Religion and Academic Freedom
ch. 3 Lectures, Dons and Undergraduates: Institutional Resilience
ch. 4 The Academic and the Practical Worlds

Part Two: Imitations of the Academic
ch. 5 The Battle of Beliefs
ch. 6 Journalism: Nutshell Truths for the Breakfast Table
ch. 7 The Ideological Imitation: The Dangers of a Little Learning
ch. 8 Is the Academic World Itself Ideological?

Part Three: The Siege of Academe
ch. 9 The Doctrine of Social Adaptation
ch. 10 The Doctrine of Social Transformation
ch. 11 The Secret University

Index
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The Shaping of American Higher Education: Emergence and Growth of the Contemporary System

Book
Cohen, Arthur M.
1998
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco
LA226.C66 1998
Topics: Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
The reader may find the title of this excellent volume too modest for the rich presentation of American educational history it offers. Much more than a shaping of that historical record, the educational facts presented gain a special resonance from the richness of the social and economic background against which the history unfolds. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
The reader may find the title of this excellent volume too modest for the rich presentation of American educational history it offers. Much more than a shaping of that historical record, the educational facts presented gain a special resonance from the richness of the social and economic background against which the history unfolds. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
The Author
Introduction: A Framework for Studying the History of Higher Education

ch. 1 Establishing the Collegiate Form in the Colonies: 1636-1789
ch. 2 The Diffusion of Small Colleges in the Emergent Nation: 1790-1869
ch. 3 University Transformation as the Nation Industrializes: 1870-1944
ch. 4 Mass Higher Education in the Era of American Hegemony: 1945-1975
ch. 5 Maintaining the Diverse System in the Contemporary Era: 1976-1998

Conclusion: Trends and Issues for the Future
References
Index
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Signs of The Times: Present and Future Theological Faculty

Journal Issue
Wheeler, Barbara G., Sharon L. Miller and Katarina Schuth
2005
Auburn Studies, No. 10 (Auburn Theological Seminary, New York, NY 2005)
BV4070.A8.A1 2005 no. 10
Topics: Theological Education   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
This issue on theological school faculty and doctoral students, who are the theological faculty of the future, revisits a topic first studied ten years ago by the Auburn Center for the Study of Theological Education. The findings of the present study, compared with those of Auburn’s earlier research, suggest that theological education is, on the whole, a stable enterprise. On many items and indicators, theological faculty and theology and ...
Additional Info:
This issue on theological school faculty and doctoral students, who are the theological faculty of the future, revisits a topic first studied ten years ago by the Auburn Center for the Study of Theological Education. The findings of the present study, compared with those of Auburn’s earlier research, suggest that theological education is, on the whole, a stable enterprise. On many items and indicators, theological faculty and theology and religion doctoral students today look and sound very much like those surveyed ten years ago. In some other areas there are slight but steady changes over the decade that may indicate trends and a few dramatic changes that invite analysis and interpretation. This report also address a new topic—theological faculty members’ teaching practices and attitudes toward teaching. (From the Publisher)
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Piety and Profession: American Protestant Theological Education, 1870-1970

Book
Miller, Glenn T.
2007
Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Company, Grand Rapids, MI
BV4030.M55 2007
Topics: Theological Education   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
From the urbanization of the Gilded Age to the upheavals of the Haight-Ashbury era, this encyclopedic work by Glenn Miller takes readers on a sweeping journey through the landscape of American theological education, highlighting such landmarks as Princeton, Andover, and Chicago, and such fault lines as denominationalism, science, and dispensationalism.
The first such exhaustive treatment of this time period in religious education, Piety and Profession is a valuable tool ...
Additional Info:
From the urbanization of the Gilded Age to the upheavals of the Haight-Ashbury era, this encyclopedic work by Glenn Miller takes readers on a sweeping journey through the landscape of American theological education, highlighting such landmarks as Princeton, Andover, and Chicago, and such fault lines as denominationalism, science, and dispensationalism.
The first such exhaustive treatment of this time period in religious education, Piety and Profession is a valuable tool for unearthing the key trends from the Civil War well into the twentieth century. All those involved in theological education will be well served by this study of how the changing world changed educational patterns. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Acknowledgments
Introduction
A New Understanding Forms
ch. 1 The Compleat Seminary
ch. 2 Seminaries Face a Reordered World
ch. 3 The Birth of the Classical Disciplines
ch. 4 Spiritual Crisis and the New Science
ch. 5 The New Biblical Studies: Round One
ch. 6 The Changing World of Schools: A New Ecology
ch. 7 The Case of Andover Theological Seminary
ch. 8 The Impact of the Social Awakening
ch. 9 Before Fundamentalism: The Educational Dynamics of Dispensationalism
ch. 10 Training Women for Mission
ch. 11 Doing It Right: The Early Years of the University of Chicago Divinity School
ch. 12 Methodism and the University
ch. 13 The Presidency
Embodying the Dream
ch. 14 An Appraisal at the End of the Era of Crusades
ch. 15 The Progressive Movement at Its Height: What Kelly Found
ch. 16 African American Theological Education: From Emancipation to the Depression
ch. 17 Troubled Decade, Troubled Churches
ch. 18 The Denominations Impacted, 1917-1930
ch. 19 Reform in Many Places: The Beginning of AATS
ch. 20 Brown-May
ch. 21 Seminaries and the Second Righteous Empire
ch. 22 A Reborn Theological Discussion
ch. 23 The Rural Church
ch. 24 Religious Education
ch. 25 Field Education and Clinical Training
Questions in the Midst of Triumph
ch. 26 American Conservative Protestantism Recovers
ch. 27 The Second World War, Ideological Struggle, and the Advance of Theological Education
ch. 28 Mr. Niebuhr Speaks: Seminaries Advance
ch. 29 Transformation: The Birth of Religion Departments
ch. 30 The Sixties: The Dawn of a New Age
Conclusion
Bibliography
Index
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Perspectives on the History of Higher Education 2007, Volume Twenty-Six

Journal Issue
Geiger, Roger L., ed.
2008
Transaction Publishers, New Brunswick
LB2300.H55
Topics: Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
This volume of "Perspectives" opens with two contrasting perspectives on the purpose of higher education at the dawning of the university age - perspectives that continue to define the debate today. First A. J. Angulo recreates the controversy surrounding the founding and early years of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Whether presented as an alternative to or a repudiation of the prevailing classical liberal education, MIT was rejected as inherently ...
Additional Info:
This volume of "Perspectives" opens with two contrasting perspectives on the purpose of higher education at the dawning of the university age - perspectives that continue to define the debate today. First A. J. Angulo recreates the controversy surrounding the founding and early years of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Whether presented as an alternative to or a repudiation of the prevailing classical liberal education, MIT was rejected as inherently inferior by college defenders. Second is George Levesque's penetrating reappraisal of Yale president Noah Porter (1870-1886). Known almost solely for his role as a college defender, Porter is revealed as a vigorous scholar who became fixated with preserving the strengths of Yale College. As these matters were vigorously debated during these years, Porter's position was superseded by more powerful forces. Considering the cliches about liberal domination of higher education, it is seldom appreciated that the conservative movement has had a presence on campus throughout the postwar era. Jennifer de Forrest uses the reorganization of several conservative foundations to offer a critical appraisal of their impact. Known as the "four sisters," the Bradley Foundation, the Scaife Foundations, the Smith Richardson Foundation, and the Olin Foundation have been sharply focused on winning student support by funding conservative scholars and networking organizations, as well as student groups and newspapers. The tempestuous state of academic publishing is made more vivid by the clash of colorful characters. At the dawn of modern academic publishing, the "Educational Review", published by Columbia's Nicholas Murray Butler, was the foremost journal in its field. Paul McInerny interweaves the history of this journal with the educational issues of the late nineteenth century and the remarkable career of Columbia's longtime president. An additional actor is James McKeen Cattell, a noted psychologist and prolific academic publisher. As a Columbia professor, Cattell was also a thorn in the side of President Butler. In 1917 Butler fired Cattell for criticizing the war effort, an egregious breach of academic freedom even for those early times. Events took an ironic turn, however, when Cattell later acquired Butler's former Review. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 The Initial Reception of MIT, 1860s-1880s (A. J. Angulo)
ch. 2 Noah Porter Revisited (George Levesque)
ch. 3 For Education and Employment: The American Federation of Teachers and Academic Freedom, 1926-1941 (Timothy Reese Cain)
ch. 4 Conservatism Goes to College: The Role of Philanthropic Foundations in the Rise of Conservative Student Networks (Jennifer de Forest)
ch. 5 Nicholas Murray Butler, James McKeen Cattell, and the Educational Review (Paul M. McInerny)
ch. 6 Selected Recent Dissertations in the History of Higher Education
Contributors
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The Role of ATS in Theological Education 1980-1990

Book
Pacala, Leon
1998
ATS Publications, Scholars Press, Atlanta
BV4019.P33 1998
Topics: Theological Education   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
A series of reflections on this period in theological education. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
A series of reflections on this period in theological education. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
ch. 1 Introduction
ch. 2 ATS as the agent of theological education
ch. 3 ATS as the agent of theological schools
ch. 4 ATS as a Binational Organization
ch. 5 The Decade in Retrospect
Index
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Piety and Intellect: The Aims and Purposes of Ante-Bellum Theological Education

Book
Miller, Glenn T.
1990
Scholars Press, Atlanta
BV4030.M54 1990
Topics: Theological Education   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
An examination of the history of American Protestant theological education which focusses on aims and purposes and how (if at all) those ideals were incarnated in particular schools. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
An examination of the history of American Protestant theological education which focusses on aims and purposes and how (if at all) those ideals were incarnated in particular schools. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction
ch. 1 Piety and Intellect
ch. 2 Theologians, Educatiors, and Accountability Piety and Intellect: Bibliography
Part 1
ch. 3 Zion's Holy Hill
ch. 4 What is a Seminary - Andover
ch. 5 Scotland Lives
ch. 6 The Church as Educator - Princeton
ch. 7 The Public Tradition
ch. 8 The New Public - Public Tradition
ch. 9 New England's Hopes
Part 2
ch. 10 The Schools Multiply
ch. 11 The temptations of Geography - The end of the national ideal
ch. 12 A historic church reborn
ch. 13 Imported Crises - Episcopalians
ch. 14 The Center Disrupted
Part 3
ch. 15 Schools, Sects, and Dissenters
ch. 16 Reborn Saints and Churches - Baptists
ch. 17 Strangers and Crusaders
ch. 18 A cacophony of confessions - immigrants
ch. 19 The Logic of Holiness
ch. 20 Scholars, Colleges, and Financiers - Methodists
ch. 21 Theology and Theological Education - Theology
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Manna from Heaven? Theological and Rabbinical Student Debt

Journal Issue
Ruger, Anthony, and Barbara G. Wheeler
1995
Auburn Studies No. 3 (The Auburn Center, New York)
BV4070.A8 A1 1995 no. 3
Topics: Theological Education   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
Although indebtedness is still not a major problem for most theological and rabbinical students, levels of indebtedness have risen steeply in recent years. These increases are usually the indirect and cumulative result of decisions made by theological and rabbinical schools.
This article outlines the findings and recommendations of the National Study of Theological Student Indebtedness, conducted between 1990 and 1994 by the Auburn Center for the Study of Theological Education. We ...
Additional Info:
Although indebtedness is still not a major problem for most theological and rabbinical students, levels of indebtedness have risen steeply in recent years. These increases are usually the indirect and cumulative result of decisions made by theological and rabbinical schools.
This article outlines the findings and recommendations of the National Study of Theological Student Indebtedness, conducted between 1990 and 1994 by the Auburn Center for the Study of Theological Education. We intend this report for those who must make decisions about the financing of theological education: administrators; faculty and trustees of theological and rabbinical schools; leaders of religious bodies that support such schools and their students; and present and prospective students. Those who seek a brief summary of the findings will find it in the italicized paragraphs that conclude each section of this articles. A detailed report on the research and its findings will be available at cost from the Auburn Center in mid-1995. (From the Publisher)
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The Bible and the University, Volume 8

Book
Jeffrey, David Lyle, C. Stephen Evans and Craig G. Bartholomew, eds.
2007
Zondervan, Grand Rapids, MI
BS538.7.B575 2007
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
It is well known that the Western university gradually evolved from the monastic stadium via the cathedral schools of the twelfth century to become the remarkably vigorous and interdisciplinary European institutions of higher learning that transformed Christian intellectual culture in the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries. It is equally well known that subsequent disciplinary developments in higher education, including the founding and flourishing of many of the most prestigious of North ...
Additional Info:
It is well known that the Western university gradually evolved from the monastic stadium via the cathedral schools of the twelfth century to become the remarkably vigorous and interdisciplinary European institutions of higher learning that transformed Christian intellectual culture in the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries. It is equally well known that subsequent disciplinary developments in higher education, including the founding and flourishing of many of the most prestigious of North American universities, owe equally to the Protestant and perhaps particularly Calvinist influence. But that the secularized modern university that descended from these developments is now in something of an identity crisis is becoming widely and often awkwardly apparent.
The reason most often given for the crisis is our general failure to produce a morally or spiritually persuasive substitute for the authority that undergirded the intellectual culture of our predecessors. This is frequently also a reason for the discomfort many experience in trying to address the problem, for it requires an acknowledgement, at least, that the secularization hypothesis has proven inadequate as a basis for the sustaining of coherence and general intelligibility in the university curriculum. Nowhere is this more apparent than in the disciplines of biblical studies and theology, which once were the anchor or common point of reference for theological thought, but which are now both marginalized in the curriculum and internally divided as to meaning and purpose, even where the Church itself is concerned.
In this final volume of the Scripture and Hermeneutic Series, a group of distinguished scholars havesought to understand the role of the Bible in relation to the disciplines in a fresh way. Offered in a spirit of humility and experimentally, the essays here consider the historic role of the Bible in the university, the status of theological reflection regarding Scripture among the disciplines today, the special role of Scripture in the development of law, the humanities and social sciences, and finally, the way the Bible speaks to issues of academic freedom, intellectual tolerance, and religious liberty.

Contributors Include:
Dallas Willard
William Abraham
Al Wolters
Scott Hahn
Glenn Olsen
Robert C. Roberts
Byron Johnson
Robert Cochran, Jr.
David I. Smith
John Sullivan
Robert Lundin
C. Stephen Evans
David Lyle Jeffrey
(From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Contributors
Abbreviations
Introduction (David Lyle Jeffrey)
The Bible in Intellectual History
Authority and Wisdom
Authority and the Book
A Flourishing of the Disciplines
Ad Fontes Redivivus?
Postscript

ch. 1 The Bible, the University, and the God Who Hides (Dallas Willard)
Sources of Knowledge
The Bible as a Source of Knowledge
A Brief History of 'Knowledge'
Knowing vs. Not-Knowing
Knowledge of the God who Hides
The Task of the Christian Intellectual

ch. 2 The Place of Scripture in Christian Theology (William J. Abraham)
An Important Platitude
The Creation of Biblical Studies
The Unexpected Disaster
The Really Deep Problem
Retracing Our Steps
Back to the Crisis Again
Turning to the Future

ch. 3 No Longer Queen: The Theological Disciplines and Their Sisters (Al Wolters)
Foundational Assumptions in Biblical Scholarship
Bringing Scripture to Bear on Christian Scholarship

ch. 4 At the School of Truth: The Ecclesial Character of Theology and Exegesis in the Thought of Benedict XVI (Scott Hahn)
Truth, Freedom, and the Academy
The Critique of Academic Biblical Criticism
The Ecclesial Locus of Theology and Exegesis
Benedict's New Synthesis

ch. 5 The Spiritual Sense(s) Today (Glenn Olsen)
Recovering the Spiritual Sense(s)
Rethinking the 'Apostolic' Exegetical Tradition
Reconsidering Terminology: 'Allegory' and 'Typology'
Reclaiming the 'Historical' Sense
Restoring the Analogical Imagination

ch. 6 Situationism and the New Testament Psychology of the Heart (Robert C. Roberts)
Introduction
Situationism
Traits and Situations
The Psychology of the Heart
Application of the Psychology of the Heart to Situationism
Conclusion

ch. 7 The Bible, Positive Law, and the Legal Academy (Robert F. Cochran, Jr.)
The Bible and Positive Law
Jesus and the Positive Law
The Legal Academy

ch. 8 Biblical Imagery and Educational Imagination: Comenius and the Garden of Delight (David I. Smith)
Faith, Learning and Metaphor
The Garden of Delight as a School
The School as a Garden of Delight
The Garden of Delight Today
Coda: Of Math, Grammar and Reconciliation

ch. 9 Reading Habits, Scripture and the University (John Sullivan)
Scripture and Scholarship
Inhospitable Environments
Moving Forward in Hope

ch. 10 The Case for Empirical Assessment of Biblical Literacy in America (Byron Johnson)
Introduction
Are Christians and Non-Christians Different on Key Social Outcome Indicators?
Is America Becoming a Secular and Less Religious Society?
Data on Religion in America
Is Bible Literacy Low and Declining in America?
Conclusions

ch. 11 'As if God Were Dead': American Literature and the Question Of Scripture (Roger Lundin)
'As if God Were Dead': Emerson and Scriptural Authority
'The Secret of Our Paternity': Scripture in the School of Melville
'An Antique Volume': Dickinson and the Limits of Scripture
A Theological Response

ch. 12 Biblical Literacy, Academic Freedom, and Christian Liberty (David Lyle Jeffrey)
Eclipse of Biblical Narrative
Egotism and the Common Lot
The Bible and Academic Freedom
Afterword - The Bible and the Academy: Some Concluding Thoughts and Possible Future Directions (C. Stephen Evans)
University of Gloucestershire
The British and Foreign Bible Society
Baylor University
Redeemer University College

Scripture Index
Names Index
Subject Index
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The Future of Christian Learning: An Evangelical and Catholic Dialogue

Book
Noll, Mark A., and James Turner
2008
Brazos Press, a division of Baker Publishing Group, Grand Rapids, MI
BR115.L32N65 2008
Topics: Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
Evangelicals and Roman Catholics have been responsible for the establishment of many colleges and universities in America. Until recently, however, they have taken very different approaches to the subject of education and have viewed one another's traditions with suspicion. In this volume, Mark Noll and James Turner offer critical but appreciative reassessments of the two traditions. Noll, writing from an evangelical perspective, and Turner, from a Roman Catholic perspective, consider ...
Additional Info:
Evangelicals and Roman Catholics have been responsible for the establishment of many colleges and universities in America. Until recently, however, they have taken very different approaches to the subject of education and have viewed one another's traditions with suspicion. In this volume, Mark Noll and James Turner offer critical but appreciative reassessments of the two traditions. Noll, writing from an evangelical perspective, and Turner, from a Roman Catholic perspective, consider the respective strengths and weaknesses of each approach and what they might learn from the other. The authors then provide brief responses to each other's essays. Thoughtful readers from both traditions will find insightful and challenging ideas regarding the importance of Christian learning and the role of faith in the modern college or university. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction

The Essays
"Reconsidering Christendom?"
"Enduring Differences, Blurring Boundaries"
The Responses
Response to "Reconsidering Christendom?"
Response to "Enduring Differences, Blurring Boundaries"
Index
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The State of the University; Academic Knowledges and the Knowledge of God

Book
Hauerwas, Stanley
2007
Blackwell Publishing, Malden, MA
BT108.H38 2007
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
In this book, controversial and world-renowned theologian, Stanley Hauerwas, tackles the issue of theology being sidelined as a necessary discipline in the modern university. It is an attempt to reclaim the knowledge of God as just that – knowledge.

* Questions why theology is no longer considered a necessary subject in the modern university, and explores the role it should play in the development of our “knowledge”
* Considers how ...
Additional Info:
In this book, controversial and world-renowned theologian, Stanley Hauerwas, tackles the issue of theology being sidelined as a necessary discipline in the modern university. It is an attempt to reclaim the knowledge of God as just that – knowledge.

* Questions why theology is no longer considered a necessary subject in the modern university, and explores the role it should play in the development of our “knowledge”
* Considers how theology is often excluded from the knowledges of the modern university because these are constituted by an understanding of time necessary to make economic and state realities seem inevitable
* Argues that it is precisely this difference that makes Christian theology an essential resource for the university to achieve its task - that is, to form people who are able to imagine a different world through critical and disciplined reflection
* Challenges the domesticated character of much recent theology by suggesting how prayer and the love of the poor are essential practices that should shape the theological task
* Converses with figures as diverse as Luigi Giussani, David Burrell, Stanley Fish, Wendell Berry, Jeff Stout, Rowan Williams and Sheldon Wolin
* Published in the new and prestigious Illuminations series. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Introduction

ch. 1 Theological Knowledge and the Knowledges of the University: Beginning Explorations
ch. 2 Leaving Ruins: The Gospel and Cultural Formations
ch. 3 How Risky is The Risk of Education: Random Reflections from the American Context
ch. 4 The End of "Religious Pluralism:" A Tribute to David Burrell, C.S.C.
ch. 5 The Pathos of the University: The Case of Stanley Fish
ch. 6 What Would a Christian University Look Like?: Some Tentative Answers Inspired by Wendell Berry
ch. 7 Pro Ecclesia, Pro Texana: Schooling the Heart in the Heart of Texas
ch. 8 Christians and the So-Called State (We Are In): A Meditation on Loyalty after September 11, 2001
ch. 9 Democratic Time: Lessons Learned from Yoder and Wolin
ch. 10 The State of the Secular: Theology, Prayer, and the University
ch. 11 To Love God, the Poor, and Learning: Lessons Learned from Saint Gregory of Nazianzus
ch. 12 Seminaries Are in Trouble: Chastened Reflections on the Centennial of Bethany Theological Seminary
ch. 13 Ordinary Time: A Tribute to Rowan Williams

Index
Cover image
Wabash tree

Engaging the Six Cultures of the Academy

Book
Bergquist, William H. and Kenneth Pawlak
2008
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco
LB2341.B476 2008
Topics: Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
In The Four Cultures of the Academy, William H. Bergquist identified four different, yet interrelated, cultures found in North American higher education: collegial, managerial, developmental, and advocacy. In this new and expanded edition of that classic work, Bergquist and coauthor Kenneth Pawlak propose that there are additional external influences in our global culture that are pressing upon the academic institution, forcing it to alter the way it goes about its ...
Additional Info:
In The Four Cultures of the Academy, William H. Bergquist identified four different, yet interrelated, cultures found in North American higher education: collegial, managerial, developmental, and advocacy. In this new and expanded edition of that classic work, Bergquist and coauthor Kenneth Pawlak propose that there are additional external influences in our global culture that are pressing upon the academic institution, forcing it to alter the way it goes about its business. Two new cultures are now emerging in the academic institution as a result of these global, external forces: the virtual culture, prompted by the technological and social forces that have emerged over the past twenty years, and the tangible culture, which values its roots, community, and physical location and has only recently been evident as a separate culture partly in response to emergence of the virtual culture. These two cultures interact with the previous four, creating new dynamics. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
About the Authors
Introduction

ch. 1 The Collegial Culture
ch. 2 The Managerial Culture
ch. 3 The Developmental Culture
ch. 4 The Advocacy Culture
ch. 5 The Virtual Culture
ch. 6 The Tangible Culture
ch. 7 Bridging the Gap

Academic Cultures Inventory
Marking Key for the Academic Cultures Inventory
References
Name Index
Subject Index
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The American University in a Postsecular Age

Book
Douglas Jacobsen and Rhonda Hustedt Jacobsen, eds.
2008
Oxford University Press, NY
BV1610.A4 2008
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
For much of the twentieth century, it was assumed that higher education was and ought to be a secular enterprise, but that approach no longer suffices. The culture has shifted, and contemporary college and university students are increasingly bringing religious and spiritual questions to campus. In response, college and university leaders are exploring anew the relationship between religion and higher education.

The American University in a Postsecular Age ...
Additional Info:
For much of the twentieth century, it was assumed that higher education was and ought to be a secular enterprise, but that approach no longer suffices. The culture has shifted, and contemporary college and university students are increasingly bringing religious and spiritual questions to campus. In response, college and university leaders are exploring anew the relationship between religion and higher education.

The American University in a Postsecular Age grapples with key questions:

—How religious or irreligious are faculty and students today? What level of religious literacy should be expected from students?
—Can religion be allowed into the classroom without being disruptive?
—Should colleges and universities help students reflect on their own faith?
—Is religion antithetical to critical inquiry?
—Can religion have a positive role to play in higher education?

This is a state-of-the-art introduction to the national discussion about religion and higher education. Leading scholars and top educators express a wide spectrum of opinions that reflect the best current thinking. Introductory and concluding essays by the editors describe the postsecular character of our age and propose a comprehensive framework intended to facilitate ongoing conversation. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction

I. Postsecular America (Douglas Jacbosen, Rhonda Hustedt Jacobsen)

Part I Religion, Institutions, and Faculty Roles
ch. 2 The Religious Convictions of College and University Professors (Neil Gross, Solon Simmons)
ch. 3 Can Faith Be More Than a Sideshow in the Contemporary Academy? (Robert Wuthnow)
ch. 4 A Level Playing Field for Religion in Higher Education(John J. DiIulio, Jr.)
ch. 5 The Ideals and Diversity of Church-Related Higher Education (Douglas Jacobsen, Rhonda Hustedt Jacobsen)
ch. 6 Why Faculty Find It Difficult to Talk about Religion (Mark U. Edwards, Jr)
ch. 7 Faculty Priorities (R. Eugene Rice)

Part II Religion, the Curriculum, and Student Learning
ch. 8 The Religious and Spiritual Journeys of College Students (Larry A. Braskamp)
ch. 9 The Different Spiritualities of the Students We Teach (Robert J. Nash, DeMethra, LaSha Bradly)
ch. 10 Spirituality, Diversity, and Learner-Centered Teaching (Elizabeth J. Tisdell)
ch. 11 Taking Religion Seriously in Public Universities (Warren A. Nord)
ch. 12 Religious Pluralism, the Study of Religion, and "Postsecular" Culture (Amanda Poterfield)
ch. 13 Professing Understanding and Professing Faith (Lee S. Shulman)

Part III A Framework for Academic Conversation
ch. 14 Talking about Religion (Douglas Jacobsen, Rhonda Hustedt Jacobsen)

Notes
Index
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Ebony Towers in Higher Education: The Evolution, Mission, and Presidency of Historically Black Colleges and Universities

Book
Richard, Ronyelle Bertrand and M. Christopher Brown II
2008
Stylus, Sterling, VA
LC2781.R527 2008
Topics: Identity, Society, and Church   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
What is the purpose of black colleges? Why do black colleges continue to exist? Are black colleges necessary?

Historically Black colleges and universities (HBCUs) are at the same time the least studied and the least understood institutions of higher education and the most maligned and the most endangered.

This unique study examines the mission of four-year HBCUs from the perspective of the campus president, as a ...
Additional Info:
What is the purpose of black colleges? Why do black colleges continue to exist? Are black colleges necessary?

Historically Black colleges and universities (HBCUs) are at the same time the least studied and the least understood institutions of higher education and the most maligned and the most endangered.

This unique study examines the mission of four-year HBCUs from the perspective of the campus president, as a foundation for understanding the relevance and role of these institutions.

This is the first research to focus on the role of presidents of black colleges; is based on extensive interviews with fifteen presidents; and takes into particular account the type of campus environments in which they operate.

Unlike community colleges, women's colleges, men's colleges, and Hispanic-serving colleges, Black colleges are racially identifiable institutions. They also vary significantly in, among other characteristics: size, control (public or private), religious affiliation, gender composition, and available resources. Although united in the historic mission of educating African Americans, each black college or university has its own identity and set of educational objectives.

The book examines how presidents define and implement mission in the context of their campuses, view the challenges they face, and confront the factors that promote or hinder implementation of their missions. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Introduction

ch. 1 Understanding Black Colleges
ch. 2 Black Campus Populations
ch. 3 Profiles of Selected Black Colleges
ch. 4 Mission Matters at Historically Black Institutions
ch. 5 The More Things Change, the More They Stay the Same

References

Appendix A Four-Year, Historically Black Colleges and Universities
Appendix B Predominantly Black Colleges and Universities
Appendix C The Research Framework: A Note on Method

About the Authors
Index
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On Thinking Institutionally

Book
Heclo, Hugh
2008
Paradign Publishers, Boulder
HM826.H43 2008
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
David Brooks discusses On Thinking Institutionally in a recent column. Read it here! David Brooks Column

A brilliant look at institutions as popular as professional sports and as austere as the Supreme Court, all through the lens of what it means to "think institutionally."

The twenty-first-century mind deeply distrusts the authority of institutions. It has taken several centuries for advocates of "critical" thinking to convince Western ...
Additional Info:
David Brooks discusses On Thinking Institutionally in a recent column. Read it here! David Brooks Column

A brilliant look at institutions as popular as professional sports and as austere as the Supreme Court, all through the lens of what it means to "think institutionally."

The twenty-first-century mind deeply distrusts the authority of institutions. It has taken several centuries for advocates of "critical" thinking to convince Western culture that to be rational, liberated, authentic, and modern means to be anti-institutional. In this mold-breaking book, Hugh Heclo moves beyond the abstract academic realm of thinking "about" institutions to the more personal significance and larger social meaning of what it is to "think institutionally." His account ranges from "respect for the game" of baseball to Greek philosophy, from twenty-first-century corporate and political scandals to Christian theology and the concept of "office" and "professionalism." Think what you will about one institution or another, but after Heclo, no reader will be left in doubt about why it matters to think and act institutionally.

What do these things have in common?
(From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments

ch. 1 Introduction: Respect for the Game
ch. 2 Our Modern Impasse
ch. 3 From Thinking about Institutions to Thinking Institutionally
ch. 4 Being Institutionally Minded
ch. 5 Applications, Dangers, and the Uphill Journey
ch. 6 Ways of Thinking, Ways of Being

Notes
Appendix: Selected Works of Hugh Heclo
Index
About the Author
Article cover image

"Pluralism by Other Means: Institutional History as a Resource for Teaching at Religiously-Affiliated Institutions"

Article
Haynes, Stephen R.
2000
Council of Societies for the Study of Religion, Houston, TX
Topics: Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Cover image

Educators in the Catholic Intellectual Tradition

Book
Elias, John L.; and Nolan, Lucinda A., eds.
2009
Sacred Heart University Press, Fairfield, CT
LC485.E38 2009
Topics: Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
This book contains a collection of studies of prominent educators who have made significant contributions to handing on the Catholic intellectual tradition in the United States. These men and women have enriched this tradition by careful attention to educational theories and methods that find their origin in the Jewish and Christian past. Ancient Israel was assiduous in handing on the Torah or Law, the prophets dramatically called people back to ...
Additional Info:
This book contains a collection of studies of prominent educators who have made significant contributions to handing on the Catholic intellectual tradition in the United States. These men and women have enriched this tradition by careful attention to educational theories and methods that find their origin in the Jewish and Christian past. Ancient Israel was assiduous in handing on the Torah or Law, the prophets dramatically called people back to the practices of the covenant, and the sages gave practical advice for everyday living. The Acts of the Apostles and the Letters of Paul chronicle the careful attention to safeguarding and transmitting the teachings in the early apostolic Christian communities. Contributors to this tradition in the past three centuries have been mainly European scholars. However, in the past two centuries educators in the United States have made notable contributions to the task of handing on the Catholic intellectual tradition.

Table Of Content:
Introduction

ch. 1 John Lancaster Spalding: Prelate and Philosopher of Catholic Education (Lucinda A. Nolan)
ch. 2 Edward Pace: Pioneer Psychologist, Philosopher, and Religious Educator (John L. Elias)
ch. 3 Thomas E. Shields: Progressive Catholic Religious Educator ((John L. Elias)
ch. 4 George Johnson: Policy Maker for Catholic Education (John L. Elias)
ch. 5 Virgil Michel: Prophet of Liturgical Education and Reform (Jacqueline Parascandola)
ch. 6 Sister M. Rosalia Walsh and the Parish Catechetical Apostolate (Lucinda A. Nolan)
ch. 7 Jacques Maritain and His Contribution to the Philosophy of Catholic Education in America (Luz M. Ibarra)
ch. 8 Neil G. McCluskey: A Public Voice for Catholic Education (Harold D. Horell)
ch. 9 Mary Perkins Ryan: Visionary in Modern Catholic Religious Education (Ann M. Heekin)
ch. 10 Shaping the Christian Century: The Vision of Gerard Sloyan (Philip A. Franco)

Reference
Contributors
Index
Cover image

Distance and Blended Learning in Asia

Book
Latchem, Colin, and Jung, Insung
2010
Taylor & Francis, Inc. New York, NY
LC5803.C65L275 2010
Topics: Online Learning   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
Distance and Blended Learning in Asia is a unique and comprehensive overview of open, distance learning (ODL) and information and communication technology (ICT) in Asian education and training. Broad in coverage, this book critically examines ODL and ICT experiences from Japan to Turkey and from Sri Lanka to Mongolia – drawing conclusions from the successes and failures, and recommending ways in which planning, management and practice may be developed for the ...
Additional Info:
Distance and Blended Learning in Asia is a unique and comprehensive overview of open, distance learning (ODL) and information and communication technology (ICT) in Asian education and training. Broad in coverage, this book critically examines ODL and ICT experiences from Japan to Turkey and from Sri Lanka to Mongolia – drawing conclusions from the successes and failures, and recommending ways in which planning, management and practice may be developed for the world’s largest concentration of adult open and distance learners.

This pioneering book draws on Asian theory, research and practice to identify the strengths, weaknesses and challenges in all sectors of Asian education and training. It critically and insightfully discusses the ideas, skills and practices that are necessary to advance knowledge in leadership and management, professional development, innovation and quality assurance and research and diffusion.

Distance and Blended Learning in Asia provides an insightful, informative and critical review of ODL / ICT developments in schools, open schooling, colleges, universities, workplace training, professional development and non-formal adult and community education. The book is an invaluable reference for ODL / ICT professionals, educators and students anywhere in the world, and is essential reading for all of those involved in ODL / ICT in Asia. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
List of Tables
Series Editor's Foreword
Preface

ch. 1 Technology, E-readiness and E-learning Readiness
ch. 2 Open Schooling, School Nets and ICT Integration in Classrooms
ch. 3 Higher Education
ch. 4 Lifelong Learning, Workplace Training, Professional Development and Non-Formal Adult and Community Education
ch. 5 New Providers and New Markets
ch. 6 ICT Integration In and Beyond the School
ch. 7 Instructional Design, Learner Support and Assessment in E-learning
ch. 8 Leadership for Educational Change and Innovation
ch. 9 Quality Assurance and Accreditation
ch. 10 Staff Training and Development
ch. 11 Research, Publication and Translating Research into Practice
ch. 12 Conclusions

Notes
References
Index
Additional Info:
Theological education is vital for the future of World Christianity—this conviction lies at the heart of this publication. Theological education has the potential to be the seedbed for the renewal of churches, their ministries, mission, and commitment to Christian unity.

If theological education is neglected by church leaders or in funding, the consequences are far reaching; they might not be visible immediately, but they will certainly become ...
Additional Info:
Theological education is vital for the future of World Christianity—this conviction lies at the heart of this publication. Theological education has the potential to be the seedbed for the renewal of churches, their ministries, mission, and commitment to Christian unity.

If theological education is neglected by church leaders or in funding, the consequences are far reaching; they might not be visible immediately, but they will certainly become manifest over time in the theological competence of church leadership, the holistic nature of mission, and the capacities for ecumenical and interfaith dialogue and the interaction between church and society.

Investment in theological education is investment of hope in the future and mission of World Christianity. The transmission of Christian memory, the education for God’s peace and justice, and the formation for church and community leadership therefore should be priorities in all churches; however, in many places theological education is far from secure or even in crisis at the present time. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
List of Contributors
Forwords:
Introduction

Part I: Theological Education in Global Context: Issues and Themes
ch. 1 Theological Education in World Christianity Since 1910
From Roman Church to World Church: Roman Catholic Theological Education (Stephen Bevans)
From Western Church to World Christianity: Developments in Theological Education in the Ecumenical Movement (David Esterline)
Key Issues for Theological Education in the 21st Century (Martin Conway)

ch. 2 From Colonial to Postcolonial Theological Education
Envisioning Postcolonial Theological Education: Dilemmas and Possibilities (Namsoon Kang)

ch. 3 Theological Education and the Missions of the Church
Theological Education and Missional Practice: A Vital Dialogue (Steve de Gruchy)
Theological Formation for Missional Faithfulness After Christendom: A Response to Steven de Gruchy (Darrell L. Guder)

ch. 4 Gender in Theological Education
Women in Theological Education from an African Perspective (Isabel Apawo Phiri, and Esther Mombo)
Women in Theological Education from an Asian Perspective (Limatula Longkumer)

ch. 5 Race, Power, and Migration in Theological Education
Global Migration and Challenges to Theological Education (Henry S. Wilson, and Werner Kahl)
Recovering the Body: When Race and Power Migrate (Lester Edwin J. Ruitz)

ch. 6 Ecumenical Perspectives in Theological Education
Ecumenical Formation in Theological Education: Historical Perspectives (Dietrich Werner)
Ecumenical Formation in Theological Education: African Perspectives (James Amanze)
Ecumenical Formation in Theological Education: Asain Perspectives (Hope S. Antone)

ch. 7 Contextuality and inter-Contextuality in Theological Education
Contextuality and inter-Contextuality in Theological Education: an Asian Perspective (Hwuan Po Ho)
Contextuality and inter-Contextuality in Theological Education: an African Perspective (Sarojini Nadar)

ch. 8 Accreditation and Quality Assurance in Theological Schools
Accreditation and Quality Assurance in Theological Education: Asian Perspectives (Hwang Po Ho)
Outcome Based Education, Accreditation and Quality Assurance in Open Distance Learning: A Case Study on Theology at the University of South Africa (Nico Botha)
Accreditation and Assessment of Student Learning in the North American Context: Models and Resources (Louis Charles Willard)

ch. 9 Public Ministry and Communication Studies in Theological Education
Public Ministry, Ethical Formation and Theological Education in India - An Exploration of Key Issues (Peniel J. Rufus Rajkumar)
Public Ministry and Ethical Formation in North American Theoloigcal Schools (Peter J. Paris)
Media Education, Communication Studies and Theological Education (Joshva Raja)

ch. 10 Spiritual Formation in Theological Education
Spiritual Formation in Protestant Theological Institutions (Marilyn Naidoo)
Missionary Training and Spirituality: Spiritual Formation in Theological Education (Robert W. Brynjolfson)

ch. 11 Interfaith Dialogue in Theological Education
The Challenge of Inter-Religious Dialogue and Praxis for African Theological Education (Emmanuel Martey)
Interfaith Dialogues in Christian Theological Education in North America: Opportunities and Challenges (Heidi Hadsell)
Training for Ministry in a Multi-Faith Context: A Case Study from Britian (Andrew Wingate)

ch. 12 People with Disabilities and Theological Education
Disability Discourse, Theological Education, and the Journey of EDAN (Samuel Kabue)

ch. 13 HIV and AIDS and Theological Education
Mainstreaming HIV and AIDS in Theological Education (Ezra Chitando)

ch. 14 Theological Education by Extension
Diversified Theological Education: Genesis, Development, and Ecumenical Potential of Theological Education by Extension (TEE) (Kangwa Mabuluki)

ch. 15 Curriculum Development in Theological Education
Curriculum Development in Theological Education: The Case of Senate Serampore Colleges in South Asia (Roger Gaikward)
The Theological Curriculum in Accredited Graduate Theological Education: A Commentary on a North American Conversation (Lester Edwin J. Ruiz)

ch. 16 Pedagogy and Methodology in Theological Education
Pedagogy and Methodology in Theological Education - Latin American Perspectives with a European Response (Matthias Preiswerk and Pierre Buehler)
Pedagogical Issues and Shifts over the Last Twenty-Five Years in Theological Education in North America (Paul Myhre)

ch. 17 Libraries in Theological Education
The Role of Theological Libraries and Library Networks (Elizabeth Pulanco and Melody Mazuk)
The Future Role of Online Libraries: Globethics Net's Innovate Model (Christopher Stueckelberger, and Amelie Vallotton)

ch. 18 International Partnership and Funding Policies in Theological Education
The United Society for the Propagation of the Gospel (USPG) and Anglican Theological Education (Michael Doe)
International Partnership and Theological Education in the Association of Protestant Churches and Missions in Germany (EMW) (Verena Grueter and Maureen Trott)
International Partnership and Funding Principles in Theological Education in Evangelical Perspective (Manfred W. Kohl)
Financial Viability and Global Solidarity for Theological Education (Yeow, Choo Lak)

Part II: Regional Surveys of Developments In Theological Education Since 1910
ch. 19 Theological Education in Africa
"Stretch Forth Thy Wings and Fly" - Theological Education in the African Context (John S. Pobee)
History and Major Goals of Regional Associations of Theological Schools in Africa (James Amanze)

ch. 20 Theological Education in Aisa
The History and Development of Theological Education in South East Asia (Michael Nai Chiu Poon)
The History and Development of Theological Education in South Asia (Wati Longehar)
Theological Education in Hong Kong: A Postcolonial Reading (Simon S. M. Kwan, and Archie C. C. Lee)
Major Developments and Challenges for Theological Education in China (Yilu Chen)
Theological Education in South Korea (Choong Koo Park)
Protestant Theological Education in Post-Soviet Central Asia: Major Developments and Challenges (Insur Shamgunov)

ch. 21 Theological Education in the Pacific and Australia
Theological Education in Oceania (Winston Halapua)
Australian Theological Education: An Historical and Thematic Overview (Charles Sherlock)

ch. 22 Theological Education in Latin America and the Caribbean
The Growth and Challenges of Theological Education in Latin America: Notes From the Pilgrimage (Jose Duque)
The Orgins of Ecumenical Theological Education in Latin America and the Caribbean (Amilcar Ulloa)
Towards and United and Contextual Program in Theological Education in the Caribbean (Noel Titus)

ch. 23 Theological Education in the Middle East
Theological Education in the Middle East (Daniel Alberto Ayuch)

ch. 24 Theological Education in North America
Theological Education in North America (Daniel O. Aleshire)

ch. 25 Theological Education in Eastern and Central Europe
Theological Education in Russian Orthodox Church (in Russia, Ukraine, Belarus) (Vladimir Fedorov)
Theological Education in Ukraine: The Case of the Mater of Ecumenical Studies in Lviv (Antoine Arjakovsky)
Theological Education in Eastern and Central Europe (Peter Penner, and Anne-Marie Kool)
Theological Education in Baltic Churches (Riho Altmurme)

ch. 26 Theological Education in Western Europe
The Study of Protestant Theology in Europe (Michael Beintker)
Theological Education in England since 1978 (David Hewlett)
Theological Education in Scandinavia Churches (Vidar I. Haanes)
Protestant Theological Education in Germany and the Role of the Religious Studies, Missiology, and Ecumenics (Ulrich Dehn, and Dietrich Werner)
Bolognanization of Theological Education in Germany and Switzerland (Reinhold Bernhard)
The Consultation Process Between European Theological Faculties (The Graz Process) (Viorel Ionita)

Part III: Theological Education From Denominational and Confessional Perspectives
ch. 27 Theological Education in Orthodox Churches
Theological Education in Orthodox World (Petros Vassiliades, Eleni Kasseluri, and Pantelis Kalaitzidis)
Theological Education in Oriental Orthodox Tradition (Kondothra M. George)

ch. 28 Theological Education in the Roman Catholic Church
Theological Education in the Roman Catholic Church (Teresa Francesca Rossi)

ch. 29 Theological Education in Anglican Churches
Theological Education in Anglican Communion (Clare Amos)

ch. 30 Theological Education in Lutheran Churches
Theological Education in Lutheran Churches (Karen L. Bloomquist, and Martin L. Sinaga)

ch. 31 Theological Education in Reformed Churches
Theological Education in Reformed Churches (Douwe Visser, Jet den Hollander,Lukas Vischer and Allan Sell)

ch. 32 Theological Education in Methodist Churches
Theological Education in Methodist Churches (Patrick Ph. Streiff, Robert F. Kohler, and Robert Solomon)

ch. 33 Theological Education in Baptist Churches
Theological Education in Baptist Churches - major trends, networks and documents (Lisa Andronoviené, Keith G. Jones, and Parush R. Parushev)

ch. 34 Theological Education in Evangelical Theological Schools
Training of Theological Educators for International Theological Education: An Evangelical Contribution from Europe (Bernhard Ott)
Theological Education in Evangelical Theological Schools in the United States (Glenn T. Miller)
Missiological and Theological Perspectives on Evangelical Theological Education in Africa (Bill Houston)
Dancing for God: Evangelical Theological Education in Global Context (Miroslav Volf)

ch. 35 Theological Education in Pentecostal Churches
Theological Education in Pentecostal Churches in Asia (Wonsuk Ma)
Pentecostalism, Ecumenism and Theological Education in Latin American Perspective (Daniel Chiquete)
African Pentecostalism and Theological Education (Cephas N. Omenyo)

Appendices
Networks, Associations, and Resources for Theological Education: Selected Websites
Cover image

Lean Years, Fat Years: Changes in the Financial Support of Protestant Education

Journal Issue
Ruger, Anthony
2000
Auburn Studies, No. 2 (Auburn Theological Seminary, New York, NY 1994)
BV4070.A8 A1 1994 no. 2
Topics: Theological Education   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
Revenue sources for theological education have changed significantly in the last twenty years with more reliance on endowments, gifts and grants and student fees.
Additional Info:
Revenue sources for theological education have changed significantly in the last twenty years with more reliance on endowments, gifts and grants and student fees.
This is the third in a series of decennial studies of revenue sources for Protestant theological education. (From the Publisher)
Cover image

The Big Picture: Strategic Choices for Theological Schools

Journal Issue
Ruger, Anthony T., and Wheeler, Barbara G.
2000
Auburn Studies, No. 7 (Auburn Theological Seminary, New York, NY 2000)
BV4070.A8 A1 2000 no. 7
Topics: Theological Education   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
This report helps theological schools situate their strategic choices in the context of theological education as a whole.

What are the kinds of choices that theological schools should be making, both in terms of material assets as well as enrollment? (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
This report helps theological schools situate their strategic choices in the context of theological education as a whole.

What are the kinds of choices that theological schools should be making, both in terms of material assets as well as enrollment? (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
What is the appropriate role of religion in scholarship and teaching? Covering topics ranging from religious influences in faculty lives to questions of academic freedom, proselytization, and appropriate limits to religious expression within the Academy, this book seeks to promote faculty self-awareness and encourage dialogue with colleagues. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
What is the appropriate role of religion in scholarship and teaching? Covering topics ranging from religious influences in faculty lives to questions of academic freedom, proselytization, and appropriate limits to religious expression within the Academy, this book seeks to promote faculty self-awareness and encourage dialogue with colleagues. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction

Part I: Cautions
ch. 1 Cautionary Tales
ch. 2 Encounters

Part II: Communities
ch. 3 Religious Formation
ch. 4 Disciplinary Formation
ch. 5 Institutional Settings

Part III: Individuals
ch. 6 Narrative Identity
ch. 7 Inclinations

Part IV: Implications
ch. 8 Community Warrant
ch. 9 Academic Freedom
ch. 10 Reticence
ch. 11 In the Classroom

Conclusion
Appendix 1: Advice for Seminar Leaders
Appendix 2: How and Why I Became an Academic
Notes
Index
Cover image

Contextualizing Theological Education

Book
Brelsford, Theodore, and Rogers, P. Alice, eds.
2008
Pilgrim Press, Cleveland, OH
BV4022.C66 2008
Topics: Theological Education   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
An introductory textbook for theological education. To contextualize theological education is to engage three contexts: academy, church, and society. In this new collection, faculty at Candler School of Theology reflect on particular meanings, insights, challenges, and implications of such an engagement. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
An introductory textbook for theological education. To contextualize theological education is to engage three contexts: academy, church, and society. In this new collection, faculty at Candler School of Theology reflect on particular meanings, insights, challenges, and implications of such an engagement. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Introduction

Part 1 Context and Contextualization In Theological Education
ch. 1 Theological Reflection in Contextual Education: An Elusive Practice (Elizabeth M. Bounds)
ch. 2 Origins of Contextualization in the Global Church (W. Harrison Daniel)
ch. 3 Theological Thinking as Contextual Practice Theodore (Theodore Brelsford and John Senior)
ch. 4 Pedagogical Lessons from Students in Ecclesial Contexts (P. Alice Rogers and Robert Winstead)
ch. 5 Black Theology and Pedagogy (Noel Leo Erskine)

Part 2 Contextualizing The Curriculum
ch. 6 International and Cross-Cultural Courses: Changing the Context (David O. Jenkins)
ch. 7 A Formula for Contextual Theology: Local + Global = Contextual (M. Thomas Thangaraj)
ch. 8 Christian Practices and Feminist Theological Formation: Doing Saving Work (Joy Ann Mcdougall and Claire Bischoff)
ch. 9 Contemporary (Pop-)Cultural Contexts and the Old Testament Classroom (Brent A. Strawn)
ch. 10 Exegesis as an Ecclesial Practice (Luke T. Johnson)
ch. 11 Twenty-Five Years of Contextualizing: A Retrospective for the Future (Mary Elizabeth Mullino Moore)

Bibliography
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Lutheran Higher Education: An Introduction for Faculty

Book
Simmons, Ernest L.
1998
Augsburg Fortress, Minneapolis, MN
LC574.S55 1998
Topics: Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
The Lutheran model of higher education affirms the diversity and need to dialog with multiple points of view within a context of academic freedom and christian presence. The great challenge for the future of Lutheran higher education is to keep the questions of faith and learning alive on our campuses. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
The Lutheran model of higher education affirms the diversity and need to dialog with multiple points of view within a context of academic freedom and christian presence. The great challenge for the future of Lutheran higher education is to keep the questions of faith and learning alive on our campuses. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Acknowledgments

ch. 1 An Overview: Why Are We Here?
ch. 2 The Historical Legacy
ch. 3 The Theological Legacy
ch. 4 Christian Vocation in the Liberal Arts
ch. 5 Student Faith Development
ch. 6 Pedagogical Issues

Conclusion
Notes
Bibliography
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The Gift and Task of Lutheran Higher Education

Book
Christenson, Tom
2004
Augsburg Fortress, Minneapolis, MN
LC574.C47 2004
Topics: Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
Why should Lutherans care whether there are any ''Lutheran'' colleges and universities? Why should people who study, teach, and work in colleges and universities care whether they are ''Lutheran'' or not? And, maybe most significantly, what does the continued robustness of Lutheran higher education have to contribute to the church and to life and work in the broader public arena? Tom Christenson has thoughtful and persuasive answers to all these ...
Additional Info:
Why should Lutherans care whether there are any ''Lutheran'' colleges and universities? Why should people who study, teach, and work in colleges and universities care whether they are ''Lutheran'' or not? And, maybe most significantly, what does the continued robustness of Lutheran higher education have to contribute to the church and to life and work in the broader public arena? Tom Christenson has thoughtful and persuasive answers to all these questions, and more. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Introduction

ch. 1 How Is a College or University Lutheran?
ch. 2 Luther, Lutheran Theology, and Eight Focal Theological Themes
ch. 3 Whole Humans - Toward a Lutheran Anthropology
ch. 4 Toward a Lutheran Epistemology: Sources and Models
ch. 5 Toward a Lutheran Epistemology: Framing a Rich and Fallible Account of Knowing
ch. 6 Implications - Curriculum and Pedagogy
ch. 7 A Community of Learners
ch. 8 Questions and Responses

Notes
Article cover image

"Putting Religious Studies on the Map at a Community College"

Article
Cronk, George
2005
The Council of Societies For The Study of Religion, Volume 34, Numbers 1&2, February & April 2005
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Cover image

Reinventing the Study of Religion in Alabama: A Symposium

Journal Issue
McCutheon, Russell T.
2004
The Council of Societies For The Study of Religion, Volume 33, Number 2, April 2004
Topics: Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
Editorial

ch. 1 Reinventing the Study of Religion in Alabama: A Symposium (Russell T. McCutcheon)

ch. 2 Personal Self-Disclosure, Religious Studies Pedagogy, and the Skeptical Mission of the Public University (Martin S. Jaffee)

ch. 3 Jewish Scholar vx. Scholar of Judaism: Problems, Pitfalls, and Possibilities-A Response to Martin Jaffee (Steven Leonard Jacobs)

ch. 4 Why Religious Studies Can’t Be Religious Studies (But Why I Like It Anyway): Methodological Agnosticism and Critique of Power in the Academic Study of Religion (Catherine M. Roach)

ch. 5 May I Share an Interpretive Task With You? Religion and Film in the Introduction to Religion Course (Theodore Louis Trost)

ch. 6 Professing Buddhism in Alabama (Kurtis R. Schaeffer)

ch. 7 Post Modern, Pedagogy, and Religious Studies (Tim Murphy)

ch. 8 Rejoinder (Martin S. Jaffee)

ch. 9 The World Religions: Buddhism (Reed M. N. Weep)

Announcements
Summer Institutes
Article cover image

"Bibliographical Essay," from The University Gets Religion: Religious Studies in American Higher Education"

Article
Hart, Darryl G.
2003
The Council of Societies For The Study of Religion, Volume 32, Number 1, November 2003
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Article cover image

"The Religious Mission of the University and Academic Freedom: An Uneasy Relationship"

Article
Stancil, Wilburn T.
2001
The Council of Societies For The Study of Religion, Volume 30, Number 3, September 2001
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Cover image

Catholic Social Learning: Educating the Faith That Does Justice

Book
Bergman, Roger
2011
Fordham University Press, New York, NY
BX1795.S62 B47 2011
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
The canon for Catholic social teaching spreads to six hundred pages, yet fewer than two pages are devoted to Catholic social learning or pedagogy. In this long-needed book, Roger Bergman begins to correct that gross imbalance. He asks: How do we educate ("lead out") the faith that does justice? How is commitment to social justice provoked and sustained over a lifetime? To address these questions, Bergman weaves what he has ...
Additional Info:
The canon for Catholic social teaching spreads to six hundred pages, yet fewer than two pages are devoted to Catholic social learning or pedagogy. In this long-needed book, Roger Bergman begins to correct that gross imbalance. He asks: How do we educate ("lead out") the faith that does justice? How is commitment to social justice provoked and sustained over a lifetime? To address these questions, Bergman weaves what he has learned from thirty years as a faith-that-does-justice educator with the best of current scholarship and historical authorities. He reflects on personal experience; the experience of Church leaders, lay activists, and university students; and the few words the tradition itself has to say about a pedagogy for justice. Catholic Social Learning explores the foundations of this pedagogy, demonstrates its practical applications, and illuminates why and how it is fundamental to Catholic higher education. Part I identifies personal encounters with the poor and marginalized as key to stimulating a hunger and thirst for justice. Part II presents three applications of Catholic social learning: cross-cultural immersion as illustrated by Creighton University's Semestre Dominicano program; community-based service learning; and the teaching of moral exemplars such as Dorothy Day, Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., and Archbishop Oscar Romero. Part III then elucidates how a pedagogy for justice applies to the traditional liberal educational mission of the Catholic university, and how it can be put into action.

Catholic Social Learning is both a valuable, practical resource for Christian educators and an important step forward in the development of a transformative pedagogy.

Roger Bergman is the founding director of the Justice and Peace Studies Program at Creighton University, where he is also Associate Professor in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Acknowledgements

Part I - Foundations
ch. 1 Personal Encounter: The Only Way
ch. 2 Ignatian Pedagogy and the Faith That Does Justice
ch. 3 Teaching Justice After MacIntyre: Toward a Catholic Philosophy of Moral Education

Part II - Applications
ch. 4 Immersion, Empathy, and Perspective Transformation: Semestre Dominicano, 1998
ch. 5 "We Made the Road by Stumbling": Aristotle, Service-Learning, and Justice
ch. 6 Meetings with Remarkable Men and Women: On Teaching Moral Exemplars

Part III - Institution and Program
ch. 7 Education for Justice and the Catholic University: Innovation or Development? An Argument from Tradition
ch. 8 Aristotle, Ignatius, and the Painful Path to Solidarity: A Pedagogy for Justice in Catholic Higher Education

Notes
References
Index
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Jesuit and Feminist Education: Intersections in Teaching and Learning in the Twenty-First Century

Book
Boryczka, Jocelyn M., and Petrino, Elizabeth A.
2012
Fordham University Press, New York, NY
LC493.J355 2012
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Religion and Academia   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
This book explores how the principles and practices of Ignatian pedagogy overlap and intersect with contemporary feminist theory in order to gain deeper insight into the complexities of today's multicultural educational contexts. Drawing on a method of inquiry that locates individual and collective standpoints in relation to social, political, and economic structures, this volume highlights points of convergence and divergence between Ignatian and feminist pedagogies to explore how educators might ...
Additional Info:
This book explores how the principles and practices of Ignatian pedagogy overlap and intersect with contemporary feminist theory in order to gain deeper insight into the complexities of today's multicultural educational contexts. Drawing on a method of inquiry that locates individual and collective standpoints in relation to social, political, and economic structures, this volume highlights points of convergence and divergence between Ignatian and feminist pedagogies to explore how educators might find strikingly similar methods that advocate common goals—including engaging with issues such as race, gender, diversity, and social justice. The contributors to this volume initiate a dynamic dialogue that will enliven our campuses for years to come. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Forward
Acknowledgements
Introduction: Educating for Transformation - Jesuit and Feminist Approaches in the Classroom and Beyond

Part I. Mapping The "Herstory" of Jesuit Education
ch. 1 "Do as I Do, Not as I Say": The Pedagogy of Action
ch. 2 Mary, the Hidden Catalyst: Reflections from an Ignatian Pilgrimage to Spain and Rome
ch. 3 Early Jesuit Pedagogy and the Subordination of Women: Resources from the Ratio Studiorum

Part II. Intersection I: Transformative Visions For Educating The Whole Person
ch. 4 "The Personal Is Political": At the Intersections of Feminist and Jesuit Education
ch. 5 Paideia and the Political Process: The Unexplored Coincidence of Jesuit and Feminist Pedagogical Visions
ch. 6 Feminist Pedagogy, the Ingnatian Paradigm, and Service-Learning: Distinctive Roots, Common Objectives, and Intriguing Challenges

Part III. Intersection II: The Power of Difference For Teaching Social Justice
ch. 7 The Intersection of Race, Class, and Gender in Jesuit and Feminist Education: Finding Transcendent Meaning in the Concrete
ch. 8 Teaching for Social Justice in the Engaged Classroom: The Intersection of Jesuit and Feminist Moral Philosophies
ch. 9 Transformative Education in a Broken World: Feminist and Jesuit Pedagogy on the Importance of Context
ch. 10 Consciousness-Raising as Discernment: Using Jesuit and Feminist Pedagogies in a Protestant Classroom

Part IV. The Fault Lines of Gender Sex, and Sexuality: Debates, Challenges, and Opportunities For The Future
ch. 11 De Certeau and "Making Do": The Case of Gay Men and Lesbians on a Jesuit Campus
ch. 12 Textual Deviance: Eve Ensler's The Vagina Monologues and Catholic Campuses
ch. 13 Tilling the Soil: Preparing Women for the Vocation of Ministry - A Challenge and Call
ch. 14 Women in Jesuit Higher Education: Ten Years Later

Afterword

Appendix
Decree 14: Jesuits and the Situation of Women in Church and Civil Society of Jesus

Notes
Bibliography
List of Contributors
Index
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A Theology of Higher Education

Book
Higton, Mike
2012
Oxford University Press, Oxford, NY
BV1610.H54 2012
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
In this book, Mike Higton provides a constructive critique of Higher Education policy and practice in the UK, the US and beyond, from the standpoint of Christian theology. He focuses on the role universities can and should play in forming students and staff in intellectual virtue, in sustaining vibrant communities of inquiry, and in serving the public good. He argues both that modern secular universities can be a proper context ...
Additional Info:
In this book, Mike Higton provides a constructive critique of Higher Education policy and practice in the UK, the US and beyond, from the standpoint of Christian theology. He focuses on the role universities can and should play in forming students and staff in intellectual virtue, in sustaining vibrant communities of inquiry, and in serving the public good. He argues both that modern secular universities can be a proper context for Christians to pursue their calling as disciples to learn and to teach, and that Christians can contribute to the flourishing of such universities as institutions devoted to learning for the common good. In the process he sets out a vision of the good university as secular and religiously plural, as socially inclusive, and as deeply and productively entangled with the surrounding society. Along the way, he engages with a range of historical examples (the medieval University of Paris, the University of Berlin in the nineteenth century, and John Henry Newman's work in Oxford and Dublin) and with a range of contemporary writers on Higher Education from George Marsden to Stanley Hauerwas and from David Ford to Rowan Williams. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction

Part I
ch. 1 Paris
ch. 2 Berlin
ch. 3 Oxford and Dublin
ch. 4 Contemporary Theological Voices

Part II
ch. 5 An Anglican Theology of Learning
ch. 6 The Virtuous University
ch. 7 The Social University
ch. 8 The Good University
ch. 9 The Negotiable University

Conclusion
Bibliography
Index
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College: What it Was, Is, and Should Be

Book
Delbanco, Andrew
2012
Princeton University Press, Princeton, NJ
LA227.4.D455 2012
Topics: Liberal Arts   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
As the commercialization of American higher education accelerates, more and more students are coming to college with the narrow aim of obtaining a preprofessional credential. The traditional four-year college experience--an exploratory time for students to discover their passions and test ideas and values with the help of teachers and peers--is in danger of becoming a thing of the past.

In College, prominent cultural critic Andrew Delbanco offers a ...
Additional Info:
As the commercialization of American higher education accelerates, more and more students are coming to college with the narrow aim of obtaining a preprofessional credential. The traditional four-year college experience--an exploratory time for students to discover their passions and test ideas and values with the help of teachers and peers--is in danger of becoming a thing of the past.

In College, prominent cultural critic Andrew Delbanco offers a trenchant defense of such an education, and warns that it is becoming a privilege reserved for the relatively rich. In arguing for what a true college education should be, he demonstrates why making it available to as many young people as possible remains central to America's democratic promise.

In a brisk and vivid historical narrative, Delbanco explains how the idea of college arose in the colonial period from the Puritan idea of the gathered church, how it struggled to survive in the nineteenth century in the shadow of the new research universities, and how, in the twentieth century, it slowly opened its doors to women, minorities, and students from low-income families. He describes the unique strengths of America's colleges in our era of globalization and, while recognizing the growing centrality of science, technology, and vocational subjects in the curriculum, he mounts a vigorous defense of a broadly humanistic education for all. Acknowledging the serious financial, intellectual, and ethical challenges that all colleges face today, Delbanco considers what is at stake in the urgent effort to protect these venerable institutions for future generations. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Introduction

ch. 1 What Is College For?
ch. 2 Orgins
ch. 3 From College to University
ch. 4 Who Went? Who Goes? Who Pays?
ch. 5 Brave New World
ch. 6 What Is to Be Done?

Acknowledgments
Notes
Index
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The Christian College Phenomenon: Inside America's Fastest Growing Institutions of Higher Learning

Book
Joeckel, Samuel, and Chesnes, Thomas
2011
Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, TX
LC427.C47 2011
Topics: Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
The Christian College Phenomenon explores the explosive growth over the last twenty years of institutions affiliated with the Council for Christian Colleges and Universities (CCCU). While public institutions of higher learning in the United States experienced a 3% growth in enrollment from 1990-1996, CCCU institutions witnessed a 36.9% growth during that same period. And in 2006, enrollment over the previous year at public universities grew by 13% and at other private colleges by 28%, but ...
Additional Info:
The Christian College Phenomenon explores the explosive growth over the last twenty years of institutions affiliated with the Council for Christian Colleges and Universities (CCCU). While public institutions of higher learning in the United States experienced a 3% growth in enrollment from 1990-1996, CCCU institutions witnessed a 36.9% growth during that same period. And in 2006, enrollment over the previous year at public universities grew by 13% and at other private colleges by 28%, but enrollment at CCCU institutions rose by 70.6%.

Editors Thomas Chesnes and Samuel Joeckel have taken an empirical approach, surveying over 1900 professors at ninety-five CCCU colleges and universities and 2300 students at twenty different schools. The editors compiled responses to quantitative and open-ended questions on topics from pedagogy and politics to faith learning integration; they then made that data available to nearly thirty scholars who have turned their considered responses into chapters that are now organized into seven book sections, covering topics in gender, evolution, faith, learning, scholarship, and race/ethnicity:

• TARGET AUDIENCE: The Christian College Phenomenon goes out to all those who study trends in American universities. Scholars and analysts, regardless of their faith commitments, will be interested to see what's happening in the CCCU schools that have experienced tremendous enrollment growth, particularly in comparison to their counterparts. What are these schools doing differently that can give all universities a new perspective on movements in contemporary education? This book offers a window into possibilities (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgements
Introduction

Part One: Faith, Learning and Scholarly Rigor
ch. 1 A Slippery Slope to Secularization? The Worthwhile Risk of Christian Higher Education
ch. 2 Christian Scholarship: Opportunities, Realities, and Challenges
ch. 3 A Coda on Faith, Learning, and Scholarly Rigor
Part One Bibliography

Part Two: Faith and Campus Culture
ch. 4 Thick Ecumenism: The Possibility of Enlarging Our Circles at Christian Colleges and Universities
ch. 5 Faith and Campus Culture: Are Faculty and Students on the Same Page?
ch. 6 Faith and Campus Culture: Living and Learning in the Questions
Part Two Bibliography

Part Three: Assessing the In-Loco-Parentis Model
ch. 7 In Loco Parentis: Strengths, Weakness, and Future Directions
ch. 8 In Loco Parentis: An Evolving Concept
ch. 9 In Loco Parentis from a Student and Faculty Perspective
Part Three Bibliography

Part Four: Academic Freedom
ch. 10 The Hesitants among Us: The Tightrope Act of Christian Scholarship
ch. 11 Fear Not: Security, Risk, and Academic Freedom
ch. 12 What Is Freedom For? Rhetoric and Reality at Christian Colleges
Part Four Bibliography

Part Five: Racial/Ethnic Diversity
ch. 13 Race and Ethnicity in CCCU Schools: Rhetoric and Reality
ch. 14 Understanding CCCU Faculty of Color
ch. 15 Biblical Multiculturalism: Moving Forward in Deed and Truth
Part Five Bibliography

Part Six: Gender Equality
ch. 16 Finding a Home in Academia: Gender Equity at CCCU Institutions
ch. 17 Are We Doomed? Why Christian Colleges and Universities Must Lead on the Issue of Gender Equity and Why They Don't
ch. 18 Holding on to the Traditions of Men: Christianity, Gender, and the Academy
Part Six Bibliography

Part Seven: Evolution and the Science Classroom
ch. 19 Deconstructing the Second Pillar of Antievolutionism and Christian Higher Education
ch. 20 Inherited Beliefs and Evolved Brains: A CCCU Challenge
ch. 21 Evolution and Christian Faith
Part Seven Bibliography

Conclusion
ch. 22 Moving Up the Slippery Slope
ch. 23 The Secular Challenges and Resources for Addressing Them

Appendix
Faculty Survey Aggregate Data
Student Survey Aggregate Data
Contributors
TTR cover image

Teaching Religion in Indonesia: A Report on Graduate Studies in Java

TTR
Lewis, Bret
2012
Teaching Theology and Religion 15, no. 3 (2012): 241-257
BL.T4 v.15 no. 3 2012
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
Established in 2000–2001, the Center for Religious and Cross-cultural Studies (CRCS) is the only master's level religious studies program at a non-religiously affiliated university in Indonesia. In many respects, the program is experimental, operating within the dynamic political and religious environment of the Muslim world's youngest and largest democracy. Like other large democracies such as India or the United States, the Indonesian government and courts have their challenges and opportunities in ...
Additional Info:
Established in 2000–2001, the Center for Religious and Cross-cultural Studies (CRCS) is the only master's level religious studies program at a non-religiously affiliated university in Indonesia. In many respects, the program is experimental, operating within the dynamic political and religious environment of the Muslim world's youngest and largest democracy. Like other large democracies such as India or the United States, the Indonesian government and courts have their challenges and opportunities in navigating a multiplicity of religions. In Indonesia, this took on particular urgency in the context of religiously-charged conflict in the 1990's and early 2000's which helped lead to the establishment of the CRCS. This paper seeks to explore how students and key faculty relate to the program's mission and approach to the study of religion while tracing the development of religious studies as a discipline in Indonesia. Special attention is paid to the political and, at times, controversial aspects of approaching religion with secular and pluralistic frameworks and language. It was informed by interviews and surveys conducted between January and May of 2010.
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Wabash tree

No Longer Invisible: Religion in University Education

Book
Jacobsen, Rhonda Hustedt, and Jacobsen, Douglas
2012
Oxford University Press, Oxford, NY
LC383.J33 2012
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
Drawing on conversations with hundreds of professors, co-curricular educators, administrators, and students from institutions spanning the entire spectrum of American colleges and universities, the Jacobsens illustrate how religion is constructively intertwined with the work of higher education in the twenty-first century. No Longer Invisible documents how, after decades when religion was marginalized, colleges and universities are re-engaging matters of faith-an educational development that is both positive and necessary.

...
Additional Info:
Drawing on conversations with hundreds of professors, co-curricular educators, administrators, and students from institutions spanning the entire spectrum of American colleges and universities, the Jacobsens illustrate how religion is constructively intertwined with the work of higher education in the twenty-first century. No Longer Invisible documents how, after decades when religion was marginalized, colleges and universities are re-engaging matters of faith-an educational development that is both positive and necessary.

Religion in contemporary American life is now incredibly complex, with religious pluralism on the rise and the categories of "religious" and "secular" often blending together in a dizzying array of lifestyles and beliefs. Using the categories of historic religion, public religion, and personal religion, No Longer Invisible offers a new framework for understanding this emerging religious terrain, a framework that can help colleges and universities-and the students who attend them-interact with religion more effectively. The stakes are high: Faced with escalating pressures to focus solely on job training, American higher education may find that paying more careful and nuanced attention to religion is a prerequisite for preserving American higher education's longstanding commitment to personal, social, and civic learning. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction: Religion within Higher Education

Part I: Context
ch. 1. Religion's ''Return''
ch. 2. The History of Religion in American Higher Education
ch. 3. Trail Markers in a Time of Transition
ch. 4. A Framework for Better Questions

Part II: Content
ch. 5. Religious Literacy
ch. 6. Interfaith Etiquette
ch. 7. Framing Knowledge
ch. 8. Civic Engagement
ch. 9. Convictions
ch. 10. Character and Vocation
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The Global University: Past, Present, and Future Perspectives

Book
Nelson, Adam R., and Wei, Ian P., eds.
2012
Palgrave Macmillan, New York
LB2322.2.G548 2012
Topics: Changes in Higher Education   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
Engages a topic of pressing concern for government, business, and education leaders around the world: the race to establish 'world-class' universities. Some herald the globalization of higher education as the key to a dynamic and productive 'knowledge society.' Others worry that modern universities have come to resemble multinational corporations. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Engages a topic of pressing concern for government, business, and education leaders around the world: the race to establish 'world-class' universities. Some herald the globalization of higher education as the key to a dynamic and productive 'knowledge society.' Others worry that modern universities have come to resemble multinational corporations. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
List of Figures and Tables
Foreword Acknowledgements
Introduction

Part I: Regionalism(s) and Global Higher Education Reform
ch. 1 Global Aspirations and Strategizing for World-Class Status: New Modes of Higher-education governance and the Emergence of Regulatory Regionalism in East Asia (Ka Ho Mok)
ch. 2 Contributing to the Southeast Asian Knowledge Economy? Australian Offshore Campuses in Malaysia and Vietnam (Anthony R. Welch)

Part II: The Changing Dimensions of University Governance
ch. 3 Collegiality and Hierarchy: Coordinating principles in higher education (Ivar Bleiklie)
ch. 4 The Twenty-First Century University: Dilemmas of Leadership and Organizational Futures (Rosemary Deem)

Part III: Academic Roles and the Purposes of the University
ch. 5 Medieval Universities and Aspirations to Universal Significance (Ian P. Wei)
ch. 6 The Changing Role of the Academic: Historical and Comparative Perspectives (Xu Xiaozhou, Xue Shan)

Part IV: Shifting Patterns in Graduate and Undergraduate Education
ch. 7 Toward General Education in the Global University: The Chinese Model (Chen Honjie, Shen Wenqin, Cai Leiluo)
ch. 8 Doctoral Education and the Global University: Student Mobility, Hierarchy, and Canadian Government Policy (Glen A. Jones, Bryan Gopaul)

Part V: Universities and External Funding
ch. 9 What Can Modern Universities Learn from the Past? English Universities Working with Industry, 1870-1914 (John Taylor)
ch. 10 Universities and the Effects of External Funding: Sub-Saharan Africa and the Nordic Countries (Peter Maassen)

Conclusion: Lessons from the Past, Considerations for the Future
Notes on Contributors
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Wabash tree

Theologia: The Fragmentation and Unity of Theological Education

Book
Farley, Edward
2001
Wipf & Stock Publishers, Eugene, OR
BV4020.F35 2001
Topics: Theological Education   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
Additional Info:


Table Of Content:
Preface

ch. 1 Introduction The Travail of the Theological School
Divinity, Scholarship, and Profession
Faith and Institution
Ratio Studiorum
The Reform of Theological Education

Part 1 - The Displacement of Theologia: A Study In The History of Presuppositions
ch. 2 Theologia: The History of a Concept
The Early Christian Centuries
From the Middle Ages to the Enlightenment
From the Enlightenment to the Present

ch. 3 From "The Study of Theology" to Theological Encyclopedia
The Post-Reformation Study-of-Theology Literature
Pre-Modern Anticipation of Change
The Eighteenth-Century Background of the Theological Encyclopedia Movement

ch. 4 Schleiermacher and the Beginning of the Encyclopedic Movement
The Earliest Theological Encyclopedias
Friedrich Schleiermacher's Brief Outline of Theological Study

ch. 5 The Triumph of the Fourfold Pattern
Theological Encyclopedia After Schleiermacher
Nineteenth-Century Modifications of the Fourfold Pattern
The Demise of the Encyclopedic Issue in the Twentieth Century
The Fourfold Pattern in North American Theological Education

Part 2 - Issues and Elements For A Reform-Oriented Conversation
ch. 6 A Critique of the Fourfold Pattern
The Fourfold Pattern and the Clerical Paradigm in Contemporary Theological Education
The Formal Character of the Fourfold Pattern
The Effects of Fragmentation on the Catalogue Fields

ch. 7 The Recovery of Theologia
A Basic Distinction
Toward a Geography of Theologia
Theologia Beyond the Way of Authority
The Structure and Dialectic of Theological Understanding

ch. 8 Theologia in Clergy Education
The Theologia of Church Leadership
The Effect of Theologia on the Course of Study
Three Criteria for Clergy Education
Theologia in the Church and in the University

Index
Cover image

Echoes from Freire for a Critically Engaged Pedagogy

Book
Mayo, Peter
2013
Bloomsbury Academic, New York, NY
LC196.M255 2013
Topics: Critical Pedagogies   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: In this concise and accessible text, Peter Mayo outlines some of the major concepts in Freire's praxis. In pursuit of a critically engaging pedagogy, Mayo compares Freire's work with a range of other thinkers and educators, including Lorenzo Milani, Antonia Darder, John Dewey, Margaret Ledwith, Antonio Gramsci, and Henry Giroux.

Chapters in the book include discussions of the State's role in ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: In this concise and accessible text, Peter Mayo outlines some of the major concepts in Freire's praxis. In pursuit of a critically engaging pedagogy, Mayo compares Freire's work with a range of other thinkers and educators, including Lorenzo Milani, Antonia Darder, John Dewey, Margaret Ledwith, Antonio Gramsci, and Henry Giroux.

Chapters in the book include discussions of the State's role in education - specifically higher education; a critical analysis of the dominant discourse in education centering on 'competences' and the type of slant this discourse takes; a study of adult education through a Freirean lens; an historical view of Nicaragua's Freire-inspired literacy and popular education campaigns of 1980; a fresh perspective on the role of social movements in the contexts of social transformation; a new analysis of the relevance of Freirean concepts for transformative research, and an exploration of educators as intellectuals and social actors.

The result is a compelling study of how Paulo Freire's writings continue to resonate around the world, and of how we must continue to apply and interpret them anew. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgements

Freirean Concepts
ch. 1 Introduction: Pedagogy of the Oppressed
ch. 2 Freire's Ideas More Generally: On Whose Side Are We When We Teach Act?
ch. 3 Freire on Intellectuals

Freirean Interpretations
ch. 4 Reading and Transforming the World Together: A Freirean Perspective on Education and Social Movements
ch. 5 The Competence Discourse and the Struggle for Social Agency and Citizenship: A Freirean Perspective
ch. 6 Critical Literacy and the Development of a Multi-Ethnic Citizenship: A Freirean Southern-European Perspective
ch. 7 Popular Education and Transformative Research
ch. 8 Adult Learning, Teaching and Programme Planning: Insights from Freire
Affinities With Freire
ch. 9 Paulo Freire and Lorenzo Milani
ch. 10 Julius Nyerere's Thinking on Education

Freirean Inspiration
ch. 11 Critical Pedagogy, Historical Materialism and Dialectical Thinking: A Tribute to Paula Allman
ch. 12 Dissidence, Love and Cultural Power: An Essay on Antonia Darder
ch. 13 Striving Against the Eclipse of Democracy: Henry A. Giroux's Critical Pedagogy for Social Justice

Bibliography
Author Index
Subject Index
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Light without Fire: The Making of America's First Muslim College

Book
Korb, Scott
2013
Beacon Press, Boston, MA
BR43.U62 Z394.2013
Topics: Religious Diversity   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
In the fall of 2010, anti-Muslim furor in the United States reached a breaking point, capping a decade in which such sentiment had surged. Loud, angry crowds gathered near New York's Ground Zero to protest plans to build an Islamic cultural center, while a small-time Florida minister appeared on national television almost nightly promising to celebrate the anniversary of 9/11 with the burning of Korans. At the same time, fifteen devout Muslims ...
Additional Info:
In the fall of 2010, anti-Muslim furor in the United States reached a breaking point, capping a decade in which such sentiment had surged. Loud, angry crowds gathered near New York's Ground Zero to protest plans to build an Islamic cultural center, while a small-time Florida minister appeared on national television almost nightly promising to celebrate the anniversary of 9/11 with the burning of Korans. At the same time, fifteen devout Muslims quietly gathered in a basement in Berkeley, California, to execute a plan that had been coming together for over a decade: to found Zaytuna College, "Where Islam Meets America." It would be the nation's first four-year Muslim liberal arts college, its mission to establish a thoroughly American, academically rigorous, and traditional indigenous Islam.

In Light without Fire, Scott Korb tells the story of the school's founders, Sheikh Hamza Yusuf and Imam Zaid Shakir, arguably the two most influential leaders in American Islam, "rock stars" who, tellingly, are little known outside their community. Korb also introduces us to Zaytuna's students, young American Muslims of all stripes who admire—indeed, love—their teachers in ways college students typically don't and whose stories, told for the first time, signal the future of Islam in this country.

From a heady theology classroom to a vibrant storefront mosque, from the run-down streets Oakland to grand ballrooms echoing with America's most powerful Muslim voices, Korb follows Zaytuna's students and teachers as they find their place and their voice. He ultimately creates an intimate portrait of the school and provides a new introduction to Islam as it is being lived and re-envisioned in America. It's no exaggeration to say that here, at Zaytuna, are tomorrow's Muslim leaders. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction 11/5/09, "Going Muslim"

ch. 1 Zaytunah
ch. 2 Al-Madrash
ch. 3 Al-Tullab
ch. 4 A Muslim Stillness
ch. 5 631 Jackson Street
ch. 6 The Dear Self
ch. 7 Reviving the Spirit
ch. 8 Peace Be uponHim
ch. 9 Sacred Caravan
ch. 10 The Citizen
ch. 11 Jesus, the Son of Mary (Peace Be upon Them)
ch. 12 Year One
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Theological Student Enrollment: A Special Report from the Auburn Center for the Study of Theological Education

Journal Issue
Barbara G. Wheeler, Anthony T. Ruger and Sharon L. Miller
2013
Auburn Studies No. 16 (Auburn Theological Seminary, New York, NY 2013)
BV4070.A8 A1 2013 no. 16
Topics: Theological Education   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
This report analyzes longitudinal enrollment trends in theological schools, using data collected by the Commission on Accrediting of the Association of Theological Schools (ATS).
It is intended to provide information that will help theological schools and the religious communities they serve as they plan strategy and attempt to manage enrollments. It also serves as a backdrop for the comprehensive study of seminary students, On Our Way: Pathways to Seminary (2013), ...
Additional Info:
This report analyzes longitudinal enrollment trends in theological schools, using data collected by the Commission on Accrediting of the Association of Theological Schools (ATS).
It is intended to provide information that will help theological schools and the religious communities they serve as they plan strategy and attempt to manage enrollments. It also serves as a backdrop for the comprehensive study of seminary students, On Our Way: Pathways to Seminary (2013), which provides an in-depth look at the experiences and influences that lead students to seminary. (From the Publisher)
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Wabash tree

Class and the College Classroom: Essays on Teaching

Book
Rosen, Robert C.
2013
LC 196.5.U6 C534 2013
Topics: Critical Pedagogies   |   Teaching Diverse Students   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: We have long been encouraged to look to education, especially higher education, for the solution to social problems, particularly as a way out of poverty for the talented and the hard working. But in its appointed role as the path to upward mobility that makes inequality more acceptable, higher education is faltering these days. As funds for public institutions are cut and tuition ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: We have long been encouraged to look to education, especially higher education, for the solution to social problems, particularly as a way out of poverty for the talented and the hard working. But in its appointed role as the path to upward mobility that makes inequality more acceptable, higher education is faltering these days. As funds for public institutions are cut and tuition costs soar everywhere; as for-profit education races into the breach; and as student debt grows wildly; the comfortable future once promised to those willing to study hard has begun to fade from sight.

So now is a good time to take a more serious look at the ways class structures higher education and the ways teachers can bring it into focus in the classroom. In recent decades, scholarly work and pedagogical practice in higher education have paid increasing attention to issues of race, class, gender, and sexuality.But among these four terms of analysis -- and clearly they are interrelated -- class is often an afterthought, and work that does examine class and higher education tends to focus only on admissions, on who is in the college classroom, not on what happens there.

Class and the College Classroom offers a broader look at the connections between college teaching and social class.It collects and reprints twenty essays originally published in Radical Teacher, a journal that has been a leader in the field of critical pedagogy since 1975. This wide-ranging and insightful volume addresses the interests, concerns, and pedagogical needs of teachers committed to social justice and provides them with new tools for thinking and teaching about class. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Permissions
Acknowledgments

Introduction

Part One - What Is Class?

ch. 1 Is Class an Identity?

Part Two - Who Gets To Be in the Classroom

ch. 2 A Dream Deferred: Undocumented Students at CUNY

ch. 3 Last In and First Out: Poor Students in Academe in Times of Fiscal Crisis

ch. 4 Welfare "Reform" and One Community College

ch. 5 Teaching Freire and CUNY Open Admissions

Part Three - Class and the Working Teacher

ch. 6 A Teaching Temp Talks Back

ch. 7 Instruction

ch. 8 Contingent Teaching, Corporate Universities, and the Academic Labor Movement

ch. 9 Anti-Intellectualism, Homophobia, and the Working-Class Gay/Lesbian Academic

Part Four - Students’ Class and Classroom Dynamics

ch. 10 Stories Out of School: Poor and Working-Class Students at a Small Liberal Arts College

ch. 11 Class Privilege, Oppression, and the World in the Classroom

ch. 12 Enforcing the Rules
ch. 13 Upward Mobility and Higher Education: Mining the Contradictions in a Worker Education Program

Part Five - Teaching About Class in the Humanities

ch. 14 Working-Class Cultural Studies in the University

ch. 15 All That Hollywood Allows: Film and the Working Class

ch. 16 Canon Contexts and Class Contexts: Teaching American Literature from a Market Perspective

ch. 17 Teaching Howards End to the Basts: Class Markers in the Classroom and in the Bourgeois Novel

Part Six - Teaching About Class Across the Campus

ch. 18 Empathy Education: Teaching About Women and Poverty in the Introductory Women's Studies Classroom

ch. 19 Teaching an Interdisciplinary Course on the American Upper Class

ch. 20 Teaching About Class in the Library


PostScript

Contributors

Index
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The Transnational Character of Theological Education

Journal Issue
Stevenson-Moessner, ed., Jeanne
2014
Spotlight on Theological Education, March
BV4019.S66
Topics: Theological Education   |   Teaching Diverse Students   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here: http://rsn.aarweb.org/spotlight-on/theo-ed/transnational-character/issue-introduction
Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here: http://rsn.aarweb.org/spotlight-on/theo-ed/transnational-character/issue-introduction

Table Of Content:
Introduction to the New Spotlight Editor, Jeanne Stevenson-Moessner

ch. 1 The Transnational Character of Theological Education: Issue Introduction (Jeanne Stevenson-Moessner)
ch. 2 Teaching Theology in a Global and Transnational World (Kwok Pui-lan)
ch. 3 Cross-Cultural Trans-Pacific Team Teaching in Theological Education (Randi Jones Walker)
ch. 4 The Politics of Interreligious Education (Najeeba Syeed-Miller)
ch. 5 Radical Border-Traversing: Theological Education in a Glocalized World of Disjuncture (Namsoon Kang)

Postscript (Jeanne Stevenson-Moessner)
Suggested Resources
Additional Info:
The MLA recommendations for departments concerning the treatment of non-tenure-track faculty members. The URL includes a link to a PDF entitled "PROFESSIONAL EMPLOYMENT PRACTICES FOR NON-TENURE-TRACK FACULTY MEMBERS: RECOMMENDATIONS AND EVALUATIVE QUESTIONS".
Additional Info:
The MLA recommendations for departments concerning the treatment of non-tenure-track faculty members. The URL includes a link to a PDF entitled "PROFESSIONAL EMPLOYMENT PRACTICES FOR NON-TENURE-TRACK FACULTY MEMBERS: RECOMMENDATIONS AND EVALUATIVE QUESTIONS".
Additional Info:
Infographic, with supporting citations, concerning the adjunctification of higher ed and the living/working conditions of contingent faculty members.
Additional Info:
Infographic, with supporting citations, concerning the adjunctification of higher ed and the living/working conditions of contingent faculty members.
Additional Info:
Adjunctification as an "education problem." Addresses the fact that academia and the media continue to promote the myth of "an academy that doesn't exist," in which tenure-track is still the norm. Looks at steps schools ought to take to help adjunct instructors accomplish their teaching.
Additional Info:
Adjunctification as an "education problem." Addresses the fact that academia and the media continue to promote the myth of "an academy that doesn't exist," in which tenure-track is still the norm. Looks at steps schools ought to take to help adjunct instructors accomplish their teaching.
Additional Info:
Inside Higher Ed narrates the dismissal of biblical scholar Christopher Rollston after his HuffPo opinion piece about the marginalization of women in biblical texts. The article discusses the relationship of tenure and donor support at a confessional seminary.
Additional Info:
Inside Higher Ed narrates the dismissal of biblical scholar Christopher Rollston after his HuffPo opinion piece about the marginalization of women in biblical texts. The article discusses the relationship of tenure and donor support at a confessional seminary.
Additional Info:
Chronicle of Higher Ed offers a time line, with links, of the controversial resignation and reinstatement of University of Virginia's president Teresa Sullivan. At the heart of the controversy is disagreement between the school's Board of Visitors and President Sullivan regarding the pace and manner of adopting online learning.
Additional Info:
Chronicle of Higher Ed offers a time line, with links, of the controversial resignation and reinstatement of University of Virginia's president Teresa Sullivan. At the heart of the controversy is disagreement between the school's Board of Visitors and President Sullivan regarding the pace and manner of adopting online learning.
Additional Info:
Op-ed in Truthout. Offers a critique of market-driven educational reforms and argues for the continuing importance of putting critical pedagogy into practice.
Additional Info:
Op-ed in Truthout. Offers a critique of market-driven educational reforms and argues for the continuing importance of putting critical pedagogy into practice.
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Towards Teaching in Public: Reshaping the Modern University

Book
Neary, Mike; Bell, Les; and Stevenson, Howard
2012
LB2331.T59 2012
Topics: Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Towards Teaching in Public: Reshaping the Modern University explores how the contested relationships between policy, curriculum and pedagogy are reshaping the modern university and examines the impact of conceptualisations of teaching in public on this debate in this age of academic capitalism. It traces the emergence of strategies for open access, with particular reference to the contribution of technology and e-learning, to the ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Towards Teaching in Public: Reshaping the Modern University explores how the contested relationships between policy, curriculum and pedagogy are reshaping the modern university and examines the impact of conceptualisations of teaching in public on this debate in this age of academic capitalism. It traces the emergence of strategies for open access, with particular reference to the contribution of technology and e-learning, to the emergence of teaching in public as a critique of current educational policy. The contributors combine policy analysis with a consideration of pedagogical issues and an exploration of the student experience.

This collection draws together chapters by experienced scholars and practitioners within the field of teaching and learning in higher education. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Notes on Contributors
Foreword
Acknowledgements

Part I: Education as a Public Good (Editor: Les Bell)
ch. 1 Teaching in Public: Reshaping the University, Mike Neary and Aileen Morris
ch. 2 Teaching in Public: Revolution as Evolution in Nineteenth-Century Higher Education, Angela Thody
ch. 3 Teaching in Public: Participation and Access in Twentieth-Century Higher Education, Les Bell

Part II: The Student/Teacher Nexus (Editor: Howard Stevenson)
ch. 4 Rethinking the Student/Teacher Nexus: Students as Consultants on Teaching in Higher Education, Karin Crawford
ch. 5 The Student as Scholar: Research and the Undergraduate Student, Andy Hagyard and Sue Watling
ch. 6 Invisible Publics: Higher Education and Digital Exclusion, Sue Watling

Part III: Teaching as a Public Activity (Editor: Mike Neary)
ch. 7 Making Teaching Public: Cracking Open Professional Practice, Aileen Morris and Howard Stevenson
ch. 8 Public Technology: Challenging the Commodification of Knowledge, Julian Beckton
ch. 9 Open Education: From the Freedom of Things to the Freedom of People, Joss Winn
ch. 10 Beyond Teaching in Public: The University as a Form of Social Knowing, Mike Neary

References
Index
Additional Info:
Religious studies suffers from the outside threat of less and less funding like all the humanities and from the inside challenge that religious studies is simply an ideology. Schneider argues that the religious studies major "needs to grow up" and learn to articulate what it is good for. He articulates several of these goods.
Additional Info:
Religious studies suffers from the outside threat of less and less funding like all the humanities and from the inside challenge that religious studies is simply an ideology. Schneider argues that the religious studies major "needs to grow up" and learn to articulate what it is good for. He articulates several of these goods.
Additional Info:
Article addresses: what are some of the drawbacks to taking a human rights approach to information rights?
Additional Info:
Article addresses: what are some of the drawbacks to taking a human rights approach to information rights?
Additional Info:
Perhaps the most dramatic shift in library services is the transition from a purely physical to a physical/virtual environment. This article examines how 21stC online librarians deliver reference services to students and faculty, and explores the ramifications future librarians’ education, including areas of technology, instruction, interpersonal skills, intellectual property.
Additional Info:
Perhaps the most dramatic shift in library services is the transition from a purely physical to a physical/virtual environment. This article examines how 21stC online librarians deliver reference services to students and faculty, and explores the ramifications future librarians’ education, including areas of technology, instruction, interpersonal skills, intellectual property.
Additional Info:
Harvard deans argue it’s time to reimagine higher education’s civic mission. The public purposes of education should go beyond benefits to individuals and focus on a tripod of intellect, morality, and action, all grounded in a knowledge base of American history and constitutional principles.
Additional Info:
Harvard deans argue it’s time to reimagine higher education’s civic mission. The public purposes of education should go beyond benefits to individuals and focus on a tripod of intellect, morality, and action, all grounded in a knowledge base of American history and constitutional principles.
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Neoliberalism's War on Higher Education

Book
Giroux, Henry A.
2014
Haymarket Books, Chicago, IL
LC89.G576 2014
Topics: Critical Pedagogies   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Neoliberalism’s War on Higher Education reveals how neoliberal policies, practices, and modes of material and symbolic violence have radically reshaped the mission and practice of higher education, short-changing a generation of young people.

Giroux exposes the corporate forces at play and charts a clear-minded and inspired course of action out of the shadows of market-driven education policy. Championing the youth ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Neoliberalism’s War on Higher Education reveals how neoliberal policies, practices, and modes of material and symbolic violence have radically reshaped the mission and practice of higher education, short-changing a generation of young people.

Giroux exposes the corporate forces at play and charts a clear-minded and inspired course of action out of the shadows of market-driven education policy. Championing the youth around the globe who have dared to resist the bartering of their future, he calls upon public intellectuals—as well as all people concer ned about the future of democracy—to speak out and defend the university as a site of critical learning and democratic promise. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Introduction

ch. 1 Dystopian Education in a Neoliberal Society
ch. 2 At the Limits of Neoliberal Higher Education: Global Youth Resistance and the American/British Divide
ch. 3 Intellectual Violence in the Age of Gated Intellectuals: Critical Pedagogy and a Return to the Political, (Brad Evans and Henry A. Giroux)
ch. 4 Universities Gone Wild: Big Sports, Big Money, and the Return of the Repressed in Higher Education, (Henry A. Giroux and Susan Searis Giroux)
ch. 5 On the Urgency for Public Intellectuals in the Academy
ch. 6 Days of Rage: The Quebec Student Protest Movement and the New Social Awakening
ch. 7 Democracy Unsettled: From Critical Pedagogy to the War on Youth, A Interview with Henry A. Giroux by Michael A. Peters

Notes
Index
Article cover image

Roundtable on Pedagogy: Renunciation as Pedagogy

Article
Sasson, Vanessa R., et al
2014
Journal of the American Academy of Religion, Vol. 82, No. 2 (2014): 313-370
Topics: Assessing Students   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
This "roundtable" collection of articles discusses the notion of renunciation in relation to an experiment in which a college class had the option to renounce the right to learn about their grades during the course. Topics include the history of grading in university and college courses, the problem of plagiarism, and the role of evaluation in higher education. Responses by Kimberly Rae Connor, Michael Desjardins Yasaman Samiksa Munro, Tina Pippin, ...
Additional Info:
This "roundtable" collection of articles discusses the notion of renunciation in relation to an experiment in which a college class had the option to renounce the right to learn about their grades during the course. Topics include the history of grading in university and college courses, the problem of plagiarism, and the role of evaluation in higher education. Responses by Kimberly Rae Connor, Michael Desjardins Yasaman Samiksa Munro, Tina Pippin, and Ken Derry
Cover image

Decentering the Ivory Tower of Academia

Book
Ramdeholl, Dianne, ed.
2013
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA (New Directions for Adult and Continuing Education, Number 139)
LC237.D43 2013
Topics: Critical Pedagogies   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
For many, the academy has historically represented privilege and intellectual exclusion; for others it has represented an increasingly contested site, as marginalized populations have challenged the myth of the ivory tower being a haven of meritocracy and equal opportunities. Still others persist in viewing universities as a level playing field, a place where people are judged primarily by their ideas and intellectual contributions.

Ironically, alongside these charged conversations ...
Additional Info:
For many, the academy has historically represented privilege and intellectual exclusion; for others it has represented an increasingly contested site, as marginalized populations have challenged the myth of the ivory tower being a haven of meritocracy and equal opportunities. Still others persist in viewing universities as a level playing field, a place where people are judged primarily by their ideas and intellectual contributions.

Ironically, alongside these charged conversations of exclusivity, privilege, and opportunity has occurred the seduction of the ivory tower by market interests, sacrificing standards in the interests of ill-defined efficiency. Much has been written on the increasingly market-driven culture of higher education; many have called this commodification and instrumentalization the most dangerous ideology of the current historical moment.

Yet, within this landscape, there have been scholars willing to make space to critically interrogate higher education in relation to multiple systems of oppression. They are working to introduce new perspectives, nurturing counter-hegemonic knowledges. Many have struggled to cocreate and sustain democratic spheres that decenter dominant interests, with the aim of a more equitable society. They have been part of a larger movement of academic warriors, academics with consciences who live out their commitments by subscribing to the notion that scholarship and activism are inextricably intertwined. This volume embodies their narratives and issues an open invitation.

This is 139th volume of this Jossey-Bass quarterly report series. Noted for its depth of coverage, it explores issues of common interest to instructors, administrators, counselors, and policymakers in a broad range of adult and continuing education settings, such as colleges and universities, extension programs, businesses, libraries, and museums. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Editor’s Notes (Dianne Ramdeholl)

ch. 1 Knowledge, Power, Hope: Activism, Research, and Social Justice (Tannis Atkinson)
This chapter describes one Canadian adult literacy frontline worker’s experiences in the field, unpacking the ways in which literacy is inextricably linked to issues of power and the policies that continue to oppress.

ch. 2 Decentering and Recentering the Ivory Tower: The Insights and Musings of an Interloper (Juanita Johnson-Bailey)

This chapter describes one woman of color’s tenuous position as an outsider despite being a tenured professor, and the ways in which she has devoted her career to building coalitions that transcend race.

ch. 3 Decentering the Ivory Tower: A University of the Poor (Shivaani A. Selvaraj)
One activist on homelessness discusses her movement-building work in the margins and her uneasy journey toward and within academia.

ch. 4 The Illusive Ground Between Town and Gown (Tom Heaney)
Describing two different partnerships between community groups
and higher institutions, the author explores conditions for equitable and fruitful partnerships.

ch. 5 The Turtle’s Shell: Protecting the Life Underneath (John Garvey, John Gordon, Peter Kleinbard, and Paul Wasserman)
The authors document their roles in the past 30 years of adult literacy work and advocacy work in New York City, aiming to preserve the history so others can walk into the story and change it.

ch. 6 Two Worlds in One Backpack (Mechthild Hart)
The author describes her personal learning journey in order to discuss how she combines the identities of academic and political activist and moves between the two worlds.

ch. 7 Labor Studies: Redefi ning a College Education (Sharon Szymanski, and Richard Wells)
Describing experiences in a labor center situated within a university, the authors describe the program’s philosophy and pedagogy, considering what dilemmas arise as educators attempt to link politics, experiences, and academic knowledges.

ch. 8 Creating a Community of Women Educated in Literacy (Mev Miller)
The author discusses the growth of a 4-year participatory research project that draws on the knowledges of adult literacy learners, educators, and supporters in ways that support women’s literacy learning, honoring ways of knowing that the academy routinely sidelines.

ch. 9. What Time Is It on the Clock of the Universe? (Dianne Ramdeholl)
In reflecting on the various experiences of authors in this volume, this final chapter unpacks the notion of decentering and implications for academia and the larger society.

Index
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Rethinking Knowledge within Higher Education: Adorno and Social Justice

Book
McArthur, Jan
2013
Bloomsbury Academic, New York, NY
LB2322.2.M325 2013
Topics: Critical Pedagogies   |   Changes in Higher Education   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Rethinking Knowledge within Higher Education argues for a higher education that is neither a romantic idyll of learning for its own sake nor an instrumental institution designed to train a willing workforce for the prevailing economic system. Instead, using analysis informed by critical theorist Theodor Adorno, this book argues that higher education should have social and economic roles at its heart, and that ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Rethinking Knowledge within Higher Education argues for a higher education that is neither a romantic idyll of learning for its own sake nor an instrumental institution designed to train a willing workforce for the prevailing economic system. Instead, using analysis informed by critical theorist Theodor Adorno, this book argues that higher education should have social and economic roles at its heart, and that these should encompass the needs of all society. The key to achieving this purpose without privilege lies in the ways in which knowledge is understood and engaged with in higher education. Higher education has a special role in society as a place in which complex, contested and dynamic knowledge is engaged with, challenged and created. The realization of this purpose challenges traditional dichotomies between economic and social purposes, liberal and vocational education, and theory and practice. Jan McArthur shows that by interpreting and adapting some of Adorno's most complex ideas, the nature of knowledge and the pursuit of social justice within higher education is feasible and aspirational. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction: Adorno and Higher Education

ch. 1 Knowledge and Social Justice in Higher Education
ch. 2 Approaches to Critical Theory and Critical Pedagogy
ch. 3 The Importance of Knowledge Being Not Easily Known
ch. 4 Beyond Standardized Engagement with Knowledge
ch. 5 The Social Implications of Engaging with Knowledge in Higher Education
ch. 6 Challenging the Theory–Practice Dichotomy
ch. 7 Towards a Higher Education Transcending Both the Elite and the Mainstream

References
Index
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The War on Learning: Gaining Ground in the Digital University

Book
Losh, Elizabeth
2014
MIT Press, Cambridge, MA
LB2395.7.L67 2014
Topics: Using Technology   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Behind the lectern stands the professor, deploying course management systems, online quizzes, wireless clickers, PowerPoint slides, podcasts, and plagiarism-detection software. In the seats are the students, armed with smartphones, laptops, tablets, music players, and social networking. Although these two forces seem poised to do battle with each other, they are really both taking part in a war on learning itself. In this book, ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Behind the lectern stands the professor, deploying course management systems, online quizzes, wireless clickers, PowerPoint slides, podcasts, and plagiarism-detection software. In the seats are the students, armed with smartphones, laptops, tablets, music players, and social networking. Although these two forces seem poised to do battle with each other, they are really both taking part in a war on learning itself. In this book, Elizabeth Losh examines current efforts to “reform" higher education by applying technological solutions to problems in teaching and learning. She finds that many of these initiatives fail because they treat education as a product rather than a process. Highly touted schemes—video games for the classroom, for example, or the distribution of iPads—let students down because they promote consumption rather than intellectual development.

Losh analyzes recent trends in postsecondary education and the rhetoric around them, often drawing on first-person accounts. In an effort to identify educational technologies that might actually work, she looks at strategies including MOOCs (massive open online courses), the gamification of subject matter, remix pedagogy, video lectures (from Randy Pausch to “the Baked Professor"), and educational virtual worlds. Finally, Losh outlines six basic principles of digital learning and describes several successful university-based initiatives. Her book will be essential reading for campus decision makers—and for anyone who cares about education and technology. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Introduction

ch. 1 What They Learn in College
ch. 2 The War on Learning
ch. 3 On Camera: The Baked Professor Makes His Debut
ch. 4 From Reality TV to the Research University: Coursecasting and Pedagogical Drama
ch. 5 The Rhetoric of the Open Courseware Movement
ch. 6 Honor Coding: Plaglarism Software and Educational Opportunities
ch. 7 Toy Problems: Education as Product
ch. 8 The Play's the Thing: Games and Virtual Worlds in Higher Education
ch. 9 Gaining Ground in Digital University

Notes
Index
Cover image

The Question of Conscience: Higher Education and Personal Responsibility

Book
Watson, David
2014
Stylus Publishing, LLC, Sterling, VA
LB2324.W38 2014
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Most of the claims about the purposes and achievements of higher education are irreducibly individualistic: it will change your life, through conversion or confirmation of faith, by improving your character, by giving you marketable “abilities,” by making you a better member of the community, or by being simply “capable” of operating more effectively in the contemporary world. All of these qualities scale up, ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Most of the claims about the purposes and achievements of higher education are irreducibly individualistic: it will change your life, through conversion or confirmation of faith, by improving your character, by giving you marketable “abilities,” by making you a better member of the community, or by being simply “capable” of operating more effectively in the contemporary world. All of these qualities scale up, of course, but in differing ways.

David Watson explores the question of what higher education sets out to do for students through a number of lenses, including the “evolutionary” stages of modern university history, the sense participants and observers try to make of them, and a collection of “purposes,” or intended personal transformations. The resulting combinations are clustered around major questions about the role of universities for their students, and in society at large. He concludes by testing claims about the role of higher education in developing varieties of personal responsibility. The Question of Conscience identifies and explores how varied these claims have been over the long history of the higher enterprise, but also how strong and determined they invariably are. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword--Theodore Zeldin
Frontispiece: What does the university do?
Preface: 'My trade' and why it matters

ch. 1 What does higher education do? An historical and philosophical overview
ch. 2 The question of conscience
ch. 3 The question of character
ch. 4 The questions of calling, craft, and competence
ch. 5 The question of Citizenship
ch. 6 The questions of conversation and capability
ch. 7 Higher Education membership: Terms and conditions
ch. 8 Higher Education and personal responsibility

References List of websites Index
Cover image

Professors and Their Politics

Book
Gross, Neil, and Simmons, Solon, eds.
2014
Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore, MD
LB2331.72.P77 2014
Topics: Faith in the Classroom   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Professors and Their Politics tackles the assumption that universities are ivory towers of radicalism with the potential to corrupt conservative youth. Neil Gross and Solon Simmons gather the work of leading sociologists, historians, and other researchers interested in the relationship between politics and higher education to present evidence to the contrary. In eleven meaty chapters, contributors describe the political makeup of American academia ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Professors and Their Politics tackles the assumption that universities are ivory towers of radicalism with the potential to corrupt conservative youth. Neil Gross and Solon Simmons gather the work of leading sociologists, historians, and other researchers interested in the relationship between politics and higher education to present evidence to the contrary. In eleven meaty chapters, contributors describe the political makeup of American academia today, consider the causes of its liberal tilt, discuss the college experience for politically conservative students, and delve into historical debates about professorial politics.

Offering readable, rigorous analyses rather than polemics, Professors and Their Politics yields important new insights into the nature of higher education institutions while challenging dogmas of both the left and the right. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction

Part I - The Lay of the Land
ch. 1 The Social and Political Views of American College and University Professors (Neil Gross and Solon Simmons)

Part II - Explaining Professional Liberalism
ch. 2 Political Liberalism and Graduate School Attendance: A Longitudinal Analysis (Ethan Fosse, Jeremy Freese, and Neil Gross)
ch. 3 Nations, Classes, and the Politics of Professors: A Comparative Perspective (Clem Brooks)
ch. 4 Political Bias in the Graduate School Admissions Process: A Field Experiment (Ethan Fosse, Neil gross, and Joseph Ma)

Part III - The Student Experience
ch. 5 The Effect of College on Social and Political Attitudes and Civic Participation (Kyle Dodson)
ch. 6 “Civil” or “Provocative?” Varieties of Conservative Student Style and Discourse in American Universities (Amy J. Binder and Kate Wood)

Part IV - Formative Periods
ch. 7 Naturalizing Liberalism in the 1950s (Andrew Jewett)
ch. 8 Challenging Neutrality: Sixties Activism and Debates over Political Advocacy in the American University (Julie A. Reuben)

Part V - Institutional Change and Its Limits
ch. 9 Activism and the Academy: Lessons from the Rise of Ethnic Students (Fabio Rojas)
ch. 10 Rationalizing Realpolitik: U.S. International Relations as a Liberal Field (Patrick Thaddeus Jackson)
ch. 11 The Merits of Marginality: Think Tanks, Conservative Intellectuals, and the Liberal Academy (Thomas Medvetz)

Conclusion
Appendix: Sample Student Emails
References
Contributors
Index
TTR cover image

Teaching Comparative Theology from an Institution's Mission

TTR
Bidlack, Bede Benjamin; Brecht, Mara; Krokus, Christian S.; Scheid, Daniel P.; and Locklin, Reid B.
2014
Teaching Theology and Religion 17, no. 4 (2014): 369-387
BL41.T4. v.17 no. 4 2014
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Religion and Academia   |   Learning Designs   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
Although comparative theology is a continuously growing method in the study of religion, it is still relatively new and not widely accepted in either confessional or secular institutions. Scholars may face difficulty when seeking their institutions' acceptance for a comparative theology course. One way of generating interest and approval for such a course is by designing it from the center of the institution's mission. Professors can look to the institution's ...
Additional Info:
Although comparative theology is a continuously growing method in the study of religion, it is still relatively new and not widely accepted in either confessional or secular institutions. Scholars may face difficulty when seeking their institutions' acceptance for a comparative theology course. One way of generating interest and approval for such a course is by designing it from the center of the institution's mission. Professors can look to the institution's mission as a resource for teaching comparatively. We offer four examples from Catholic institutions of how this might be done. Reid Locklin offers further insights in his response to our explorations.
Journal cover image

Distinctive, Not Disposable: Religious Studies in American Public Higher Education in the Twenty-first Century

Journal Issue
Robinson, Joanne, (Guest Editor), Posman, Ellen, and Locklin, Reid B., (Editors)
2012
Spotlight on Teaching, May
BL41.S72
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Liberal Arts   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here: http://rsnonline.org/index51c0.html?option=com_content&view=article&id=306&Itemid=269
Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here: http://rsnonline.org/index51c0.html?option=com_content&view=article&id=306&Itemid=269

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Distinctive, Not Disposable: Religious Studies in American Public Higher Education in the Twenty-first Century (Joanne Robinson, Guest Editor)
ch. 2 From Traditions to Topics to Themes, within an Era of Technological Change (Joel Gereboff)
ch. 3 Religious Studies in the Context of Liberal Education (Brian C. Wilson)
ch. 4 Teaching Religion, Teaching Disruption: Inculcating Independent Critical Thinking through the Study of Religion (Stephen C. Finley)
ch. 5 The Examined Life: Religious Studies and the Cultivation of Self-Reflection (Laura Ammon)
ch. 6 The Lively Classroom: A Fusion of Gen Ed and Religious Studies (Celia Brewer Sinclair)
ch. 7 Hybrid Vigor in Religious Studies Courses (Lora Hobbs)
ch. 8 Religious Studies in American Public Higher Education in the Twenty-first Century: Suggested Resources
Journal cover image

Teaching Religious Studies in Stand-alone MA Programs: Guest Editor's Introduction

Journal Issue
Berkwitz, Stephen C., (Guest Editor)
2012
Spotlight on Teaching, October
BL41.S72
Topics: Doctoral Students and New Teachers   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here: http://rsnonline.org/index51c0.html?option=com_content&view=article&id=306&Itemid=269
Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here: http://rsnonline.org/index51c0.html?option=com_content&view=article&id=306&Itemid=269

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Teaching Religious Studies in Stand-alone MA Programs: Guest Editor's Introduction (Stephen C. Berkwitz, Guest Editor)
ch. 2 Context and Conversation in a Stand-alone MA Program (Kent L. Brintnall)
ch. 3 Teaching Split-level Classes (Liz Wilson)
ch. 4 Isolating a Passage from a Reading in “Mixed” or “Split-level” Courses (Carolyn M. Jones Medine)
ch. 5 Climb Up or Dig Down: Reflections on the Capstone Course in a Religious Studies MA Program (William R. Lindsey)
ch. 6 Grappling With Less Commonly Taught Languages in a Stand-alone Master’s Program (Holly Gayley)
ch. 7 Graduate Student Pedagogical Training as a Key Component of Stand-alone MA Programs in Religious Studies (Brian C. Wilson, and Stephen G. Covell)
ch. 8 Integrating Community Engagement and Service Learning into an MA Program (Andrea L. Stanton)
ch. 9 The Master’s Thesis: Overcoming Its Challenges (Martha L. Finch)
ch. 10 Teaching Religious Studies in Stand-alone MA Programs: Suggested Resources
ch. 11 "Go-To" Teaching Resources
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Beyond the Culture Wars: How Teaching the Conflicts Can Revitalize American Education

Book
Graff, Gerald
1992
W.W. Norton & Company, Inc., New York, NY
LC191.4 G73 1992
Topics: Identity, Society, and Church   |   Liberal Arts   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
"Graff offers a highly readable and down-to-earth perspective on some of the most ballyhooed issues in higher education today. . . . By encouraging us to argue together, he may yet help us to reason together."—Henry Louis Gates, Jr. Higher education should by a battleground of ideas: the real problem, Gerald Graff says, is that students are not getting more out of the battle. In this lively book, Graff argues that the "...
Additional Info:
"Graff offers a highly readable and down-to-earth perspective on some of the most ballyhooed issues in higher education today. . . . By encouraging us to argue together, he may yet help us to reason together."—Henry Louis Gates, Jr. Higher education should by a battleground of ideas: the real problem, Gerald Graff says, is that students are not getting more out of the battle. In this lively book, Graff argues that the "culture wars" now being fought over multiculturalism and political correctness are actually a sign of the intellectual vitality of American education—but they need to be used creatively, made part of the educational process itself. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface

ch. 1 Introduction: Conflict in America
ch. 2 The Vanishing Classics and Other Myths: Two Episodes in the Culture War
ch. 3 Ho to Save "Dover Beach"
ch. 4 Hidden Meaning, or, Disliking Books at an Early Age
ch. 5 "Life of the Mind Stuff"
ch. 6 Other Voices, Other Rooms
ch. 7 Burying the Battlefield, or, a Short History of How the Curriculum Became a Cafeteria Counter
ch. 8 When Is Something "Political"?
ch. 9 Turning Conflict into Community

Notes
Index
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Higher Education in the Digital Age

Book
Bowen, William G.
2013
Princeton University Press, Princeton, NJ
LB2395.7.B67 2013
Topics: Online Learning   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Two of the most visible and important trends in higher education today are its exploding costs and the rapid expansion of online learning. Could the growth in online courses slow the rising cost of college and help solve the crisis of affordability? In this short and incisive book, William G. Bowen, one of the foremost experts on the intersection of education and economics, ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Two of the most visible and important trends in higher education today are its exploding costs and the rapid expansion of online learning. Could the growth in online courses slow the rising cost of college and help solve the crisis of affordability? In this short and incisive book, William G. Bowen, one of the foremost experts on the intersection of education and economics, explains why, despite his earlier skepticism, he now believes technology has the potential to help rein in costs without negatively affecting student learning. As a former president of Princeton University, an economist, and author of many books on education, including the acclaimed bestseller The Shape of the River, Bowen speaks with unique expertise on the subject.

Surveying the dizzying array of new technology-based teaching and learning initiatives, including the highly publicized emergence of "massive open online courses" (MOOCs), Bowen argues that such technologies could transform traditional higher education--allowing it at last to curb rising costs by increasing productivity, while preserving quality and protecting core values. But the challenges, which are organizational and philosophical as much as technological, are daunting. They include providing hard evidence of whether online education is cost-effective in various settings, rethinking the governance and decision-making structures of higher education, and developing customizable technological platforms. Yet, Bowen remains optimistic that the potential payoff is great.

Based on the 2012 Tanner Lectures on Human Values, delivered at Stanford University, the book includes responses from Stanford president John Hennessy, Harvard University psychologist Howard Gardner, Columbia University literature professor Andrew Delbanco, and Coursera cofounder Daphne Koller. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface and Acknowledgments
Foreword to the Paperback Edition
Contributors

Part 1 - Costs and Productivity in Higher Education
ch. 1 Cost Trends, the “Cost disease,” and productivity in Higher Eduction
ch. 2 Factors Other Than the Cost Disease Pushing Up Educational Costs
ch. 3 Affordability
ch. 4 Is There a Serious Problem - Even a Crisis?
ch. 5 Notes

Part 2 - Prospects for an Online Fix
ch. 6 Background
ch. 7 The Lack of Hard Evidence
ch. 8 The Need for Customizable, Sustainable Platforms (or Tool Kits)
ch. 9 The Need for New Mindsets - and Fresh Thinking about Decision-Making
ch. 10 What Musts We Retain?
ch. 11 Appendix: The Online Learning Landscape
ch. 12 Notes

Discussion by Howard Gardner
Discussion by John Hennessy
William G. Bowen’s Responses to Discussion Session
Comments by Howard Gardner and John Hennessy
Discussion by Andrew Delbanco
Discussion by Daphne Koller
William G. Bowen’s Responses to Discussion Session
Comments by Andrew Delbanco and Daphne Koller
Appendix to the Paperback Edition
Index
TTR cover image

Founders, Finding, Being Found: Women’s Wisdom in Teaching and Learning in Theology and Religion

TTR
Hess, Lisa M.; Brosmer, Mary Pierce; and Moore, Mary Elizabeth Mullino
2015
Teaching Theology and Religion 18, no. 2 (2015): 170-185
BL41.T4 v.18 no.2 2015
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Diversifying the Faculty   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
This is an edited transcript of a conversation between two founding women on the delights and demands of teaching and learning within and beyond traditional institutional life, facilitated by Lisa M. Hess of the journal's Editorial Board. The conscious feminine practices of a women's writing school, Women Writing for (a) Change (Cincinnati, Ohio), created the circle-container for the sharing of words and wisdom. Narrative, pedagogical, and organizational issues arose as ...
Additional Info:
This is an edited transcript of a conversation between two founding women on the delights and demands of teaching and learning within and beyond traditional institutional life, facilitated by Lisa M. Hess of the journal's Editorial Board. The conscious feminine practices of a women's writing school, Women Writing for (a) Change (Cincinnati, Ohio), created the circle-container for the sharing of words and wisdom. Narrative, pedagogical, and organizational issues arose as the circle listened and examined the realities of contributing as a woman in higher education, yesterday and today.
Cover image

Democratizing Higher Education: International Comparative Perspectives

Book
Blessinger, Patrick; and Anchan, John P., eds.
2015
Routledge, New York, NY
LC213.D45 2015
Topics: Critical Pedagogies   |   Changes in Higher Education   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
Higher education systems around the world are undergoing fundamental change and reform due to external pressures—including internationalization of higher education, increased international competition for students, less reliance on public funding, and calls to create greater access opportunities for citizens. How are higher education systems evolving structurally as a result of these and other pressures? In light of these changes, how can higher education be a positive force for democratizing ...
Additional Info:
Higher education systems around the world are undergoing fundamental change and reform due to external pressures—including internationalization of higher education, increased international competition for students, less reliance on public funding, and calls to create greater access opportunities for citizens. How are higher education systems evolving structurally as a result of these and other pressures? In light of these changes, how can higher education be a positive force for democratizing societies?

This book examines the emerging trends taking place in higher education systems around the world, focusing on the most salient political and social forces that underlie these trends. Each chapter provides a case study of a country, exploring its cultural and political history, the political and social developments that have affected its higher education system, and the result of these changes on the higher education system. In a fast-changing, knowledge-intensive, democratic society, Democratizing Higher Education explores how higher education systems can be developed to provide access, affordability, participation, and quality life-long learning for all. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword (Nel Noddings)
Preface (Patrick Blessinger and John P. Anchan)

ch. 1 An Introduction to Democratizing Higher Education (John P. Anchan)
ch. 2 Democratizing Higher Education in the United States: A Legacy of Democratic Learning (Linda Watts)
ch. 3 Democratizing Higher Education in Canada: Quality and Educational Development (Arshad Ahmad and Lori Goff)
ch. 4 Democratization in European Higher Education: The Past, Present, and Future of the Bologna Process (María Luisa Pérez Cañado)
ch. 5 South Europe Higher Education: Portugal and Its Peripheral Regions (Luísa Soares and Catarina Faria)
ch. 6 Democratizing Higher Education in the United Kingdom: A Case Study (Craig Mahoney and Helena Lim)
ch. 7 Higher Education in Scandinavia: A Case Study (Jorgen Lerche Nielsen and Lars Birch Andreasen)
ch. 8 Higher Education in New Zealand: A Case Study of the Land of the Long White Cloud (Lorraine Stefani)
ch. 9 Higher Education in South Africa: A Case Study (Mandla S. Makhanya and Jeanette C. Botha)
ch. 10 Modernization of Russian Higher Education: Progress and Opportunities (Natalia Moscvina and Olga Kovbasyuk)
ch. 11 Democratizing Higher Education in China’s Hong Kong: Between Rhetoric and Reality (Hei-hang Hayes Tang)
ch. 12 Democratization of Higher Education in India: A Case Study (Arputharaj Devaraj)
ch. 13 Malaysian Higher Education: A Case Study (Enakshi Sengupta)
ch. 14 The Future of Higher Education: Towards A Democratic Theory of Higher Education (Patrick Blessinger)
ch. 15 Democratizing Higher Education: Concluding Thoughts (Patrick Blessinger)

About the Contributors
Index
Cover image

Buddhist-Based Universities in the United States: Searching for a New Model in Higher Education

Book
Storch, Tanya
2015
Rowman & Littlefield, Publishers, Lanham, MD
LC929.7.U6 S76 2015
Topics: Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Buddhist-Based Universities in the United States: Searching for a New Model in Higher Education investigates in depth four American Buddhist universities, namely, the Dharma Realm Buddhist University, the University of the West, the Soka University of America, and the Naropa University, all of which offer degrees in liberal arts and professional fields, and at the same time educate their students in the philosophy ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Buddhist-Based Universities in the United States: Searching for a New Model in Higher Education investigates in depth four American Buddhist universities, namely, the Dharma Realm Buddhist University, the University of the West, the Soka University of America, and the Naropa University, all of which offer degrees in liberal arts and professional fields, and at the same time educate their students in the philosophy and practices of Buddhism. Buddhist universities in the United States are unique because there are no comparable universities based on the philosophy and practices of other Asian religions also popular in the United States, such as Hinduism, Confucianism, or Sikhism. Even the Jewish community has created only two universities in which professional skills and liberal arts are taught from the position of the moral-philosophical principles of Judaism. This book presents the institutional history and academic programs of four Buddhist universities in America and analyzes Buddhist-based pedagogical principles, as well as teaching and learning techniques, which can be very useful for other colleges and universities in the United States. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction
ch. 1 University of the West
ch. 2 The Dharma Realm Buddhist University
ch. 3 Naropa University
ch. 4 Soka University of America
ch. 5 Buddhist Pedagogy

Conclusion: Conversation
Bibliography
Index
About the Author
Additional Info:
An attempt to create a large-scale online database of university course syllabi as a platform for new research, teaching, and administrative tools. The goal is to improve our understanding of teaching, publishing, and intellectual history on a wide range of fronts.
Additional Info:
An attempt to create a large-scale online database of university course syllabi as a platform for new research, teaching, and administrative tools. The goal is to improve our understanding of teaching, publishing, and intellectual history on a wide range of fronts.
Additional Info:
The Center for Internationalization and Global Engagement has collected examples of policies, programs, surveys, and other resources according to the six aspects of the CIGE Model for Comprehensive Internationalization, and are provided as models for other colleges and universities as they pursue their internationalization goals.
Additional Info:
The Center for Internationalization and Global Engagement has collected examples of policies, programs, surveys, and other resources according to the six aspects of the CIGE Model for Comprehensive Internationalization, and are provided as models for other colleges and universities as they pursue their internationalization goals.
TTR cover image

Teaching Religion Around the World: A Modest First Glimpse

TTR
Robinson, Joanne Maguire
2015
Teaching Theology and Religion 18, no. 3 (2015): 235-247
BL41.T4 v.18 no. 3 2015
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
This essay introduces a collection of short essays solicited from authors around the globe who teach religion courses at the college level (not for professional religious training). The central question uniting this collection is whether religious studies is a unified and global pedagogical field, and this introduction teases out salient continuities and discontinuities driven by broad cultural and political contexts. These essays are published together with this introduction in Teaching ...
Additional Info:
This essay introduces a collection of short essays solicited from authors around the globe who teach religion courses at the college level (not for professional religious training). The central question uniting this collection is whether religious studies is a unified and global pedagogical field, and this introduction teases out salient continuities and discontinuities driven by broad cultural and political contexts. These essays are published together with this introduction in Teaching Theology and Religion 18:3 (July 2015). The authors were asked to provide a brief overview of the curriculum, student learning goals, and pedagogical techniques employed in their courses.
TTR cover image

The Basic Courses for the Study of Religions at the University of Southern Denmark

TTR
Jensen, Tim
2015
Teaching Theology and Religion 18, no. 3 (2015): 248-251
BL41.T4 v.18 no. 3 2015
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
This essay is part of a collection of short essays solicited from authors around the globe who teach religion courses at the college level (not for professional religious training). They are published together with an introduction in Teaching Theology and Religion 18:3 (July 2015). The authors were asked to provide a brief overview of the curriculum, student learning goals, and pedagogical techniques employed in their courses.
Additional Info:
This essay is part of a collection of short essays solicited from authors around the globe who teach religion courses at the college level (not for professional religious training). They are published together with an introduction in Teaching Theology and Religion 18:3 (July 2015). The authors were asked to provide a brief overview of the curriculum, student learning goals, and pedagogical techniques employed in their courses.
TTR cover image

Religion, Education and Religious Education in Irish Schools

TTR
Hyland, Áine and Bocking, Brian
2015
Teaching Theology and Religion 18, no. 3 (2015): 252-261
BL41.T4 v.18 no. 3 2015
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
This essay is part of a collection of short essays solicited from authors around the globe who teach religion courses at the college level (not for professional religious training). They are published together with an introduction in Teaching Theology and Religion 18:3 (July 2015). The authors were asked to provide a brief overview of the curriculum, student learning goals, and pedagogical techniques employed in their courses.
Additional Info:
This essay is part of a collection of short essays solicited from authors around the globe who teach religion courses at the college level (not for professional religious training). They are published together with an introduction in Teaching Theology and Religion 18:3 (July 2015). The authors were asked to provide a brief overview of the curriculum, student learning goals, and pedagogical techniques employed in their courses.
TTR cover image

Prospects for Religious Studies in Turkey

TTR
Wiseman, Wendy A. and Kesgin, Burak
2015
Teaching Theology and Religion 18, no. 3 (2015): 262-270
BL41.T4 v.18 no. 3 2015
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
This essay is part of a collection of short essays solicited from authors around the globe who teach religion courses at the college level (not for professional religious training). They are published together with an introduction in Teaching Theology and Religion 18:3 (July 2015). The authors were asked to provide a brief overview of the curriculum, student learning goals, and pedagogical techniques employed in their courses. Wendy Wiseman taught Humanities courses at ...
Additional Info:
This essay is part of a collection of short essays solicited from authors around the globe who teach religion courses at the college level (not for professional religious training). They are published together with an introduction in Teaching Theology and Religion 18:3 (July 2015). The authors were asked to provide a brief overview of the curriculum, student learning goals, and pedagogical techniques employed in their courses. Wendy Wiseman taught Humanities courses at Ozyegin University in Istanbul from 2008-2013, taught Religious Studies at Indiana University the following year, and returned to Istanbul to teach at Beykent University. Burak Kesgin is Chair of Sociology at Beykent University, with a focus on political economy and sociology of religion.
TTR cover image

Teaching and Learning Theology and Religion at the University of Botswana

TTR
Togarasei, Lovemore
2015
Teaching Theology and Religion 18, no. 3 (2015): 271-275
BL41.T4 v.18 no. 3 2015
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
This essay is part of a collection of short essays solicited from authors around the globe who teach religion courses at the college level (not for professional religious training). They are published together with an introduction in Teaching Theology and Religion 18:3 (July 2015). The authors were asked to provide a brief overview of the curriculum, student learning goals, and pedagogical techniques employed in their courses.
Additional Info:
This essay is part of a collection of short essays solicited from authors around the globe who teach religion courses at the college level (not for professional religious training). They are published together with an introduction in Teaching Theology and Religion 18:3 (July 2015). The authors were asked to provide a brief overview of the curriculum, student learning goals, and pedagogical techniques employed in their courses.
TTR cover image

How Religious Studies is Taught in Japan

TTR
Fujiwara, Satoko
2015
Teaching Theology and Religion 18, no. 3 (2015): 276-279
BL41.T4 v.18 no. 3 2015
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
This essay is part of a collection of short essays solicited from authors around the globe who teach religion courses at the college level (not for professional religious training). They are published together with an introduction in Teaching Theology and Religion 18:3 (July 2015). The authors were asked to provide a brief overview of the curriculum, student learning goals, and pedagogical techniques employed in their courses.
Additional Info:
This essay is part of a collection of short essays solicited from authors around the globe who teach religion courses at the college level (not for professional religious training). They are published together with an introduction in Teaching Theology and Religion 18:3 (July 2015). The authors were asked to provide a brief overview of the curriculum, student learning goals, and pedagogical techniques employed in their courses.
TTR cover image

Teaching Religious Studies at the International Islamic University Malaysia

TTR
Kenney, Jeffrey T.
2015
Teaching Theology and Religion 18, no. 3 (2015): 280-285
BL41.T4 v.18 no. 3 2015
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
This essay is part of a collection of short essays solicited from authors around the globe who teach religion courses at the college level (not for professional religious training). They are published together with an introduction in Teaching Theology and Religion 18:3 (July 2015). The authors were asked to provide a brief overview of the curriculum, student learning goals, and pedagogical techniques employed in their courses.
Additional Info:
This essay is part of a collection of short essays solicited from authors around the globe who teach religion courses at the college level (not for professional religious training). They are published together with an introduction in Teaching Theology and Religion 18:3 (July 2015). The authors were asked to provide a brief overview of the curriculum, student learning goals, and pedagogical techniques employed in their courses.
TTR cover image

Teaching Church History in Global Perspective in New Zealand

TTR
Cooper, Tim
2015
Teaching Theology and Religion 18, no. 3 (2015): 286-290
BL41.T4 v.18 no. 3 2015
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
This essay is part of a collection of short essays solicited from authors around the globe who teach religion courses at the college level (not for professional religious training). They are published together with an introduction in Teaching Theology and Religion 18:3 (July 2015). The authors were asked to provide a brief overview of the curriculum, student learning goals, and pedagogical techniques employed in their courses.
Additional Info:
This essay is part of a collection of short essays solicited from authors around the globe who teach religion courses at the college level (not for professional religious training). They are published together with an introduction in Teaching Theology and Religion 18:3 (July 2015). The authors were asked to provide a brief overview of the curriculum, student learning goals, and pedagogical techniques employed in their courses.
TTR cover image

Teaching Religious Studies to Undergraduate Non-Majors at Seoul National University, South Korea

TTR
Yoo, Yohan
2015
Teaching Theology and Religion 18, no. 3 (2015): 291-295
BL41.T4 v.18 no. 3 2015
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
This essay is part of a collection of short essays solicited from authors around the globe who teach religion courses at the college level (not for professional religious training). They are published together with an introduction in Teaching Theology and Religion 18:3 (July 2015). The authors were asked to provide a brief overview of the curriculum, student learning goals, and pedagogical techniques employed in their courses.
Additional Info:
This essay is part of a collection of short essays solicited from authors around the globe who teach religion courses at the college level (not for professional religious training). They are published together with an introduction in Teaching Theology and Religion 18:3 (July 2015). The authors were asked to provide a brief overview of the curriculum, student learning goals, and pedagogical techniques employed in their courses.
TTR cover image

Teaching Religion in Brazil, in Public Schools and Confessional Colleges

TTR
Cruz, Eduardo R. and Soares, Afonso L.
2015
Teaching Theology and Religion 18, no. 3 (2015): 296-300
BL41.T4 v.18 no. 3 2015
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
This essay is part of a collection of short essays solicited from authors around the globe who teach religion courses at the college level (not for professional religious training). They are published together with an introduction in Teaching Theology and Religion 18:3 (July 2015). The authors were asked to provide a brief overview of the curriculum, student learning goals, and pedagogical techniques employed in their courses.
Additional Info:
This essay is part of a collection of short essays solicited from authors around the globe who teach religion courses at the college level (not for professional religious training). They are published together with an introduction in Teaching Theology and Religion 18:3 (July 2015). The authors were asked to provide a brief overview of the curriculum, student learning goals, and pedagogical techniques employed in their courses.
Cover image

Higher Education Access and Choice for Latino Students: Critical Findings and Theoretical Perspectives

Book
Perez, Patricia A.; and Ceja, Miguel, eds.
2015
Routledge, New York, NY
LC2670.6.H54 2015
Topics: Teaching Diverse Students   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Now the largest and fastest-growing ethnic population in the U.S., Latino students face many challenges and complexities when it comes to college choice and access. This edited volume provides much needed theoretical and empirical data on how the schooling experiences of Latino students shape their educational aspirations and access to higher education. It explores how the individual and collective influence of the home, school and policy shape the college decision-making process.

This unique collection of original scholarly articles offers critical insight on educational pathways that will help families, educators and policy makers intervene in ways that foster and sustain college access and participation for Latino students. It considers destination preferences and enrollment selections, elementary and secondary school experiences, and intervention programs that shed light on how practitioners can promote participation and retention. This multi-conceptual, multi-methodological volume offers directions for future research, programming and policy in Latino education. (From the Publisher)


Table Of Content:
List of Tables and Figures
Acknowledgments

ch. 1 Introduction: What do we Know About Latina/o College Access and Choice? (Patricia A. Pérez and Miguel Ceja)

Part I: Home, Elementary, & Secondary Context
ch. 2 Sixth Grade Teachers’ Perceptions of the College Bound Student (Jolene McCall, Maria Estela Zarate, and Wendy Y. Perez)
ch. 3 Constructing College "Choice" for Latino Students: The Organizational Culture of an Urban Catholic High School (Paul Rodriguez and Anne-Marie Nuñez)
ch. 4 Unpacking the Layers: Financial Aid and Latino High School Students’ Postsecondary Plans (José Muñoz and Blanca Rincón)
ch. 5 A Model for Understanding the Latina/o Student and Parent College-going Negotiation Process (Cynthia Alvarez)

Part II: Political Context & Postsecondary Choice
ch. 6 Neoliberal Futures and Postsecondary Opportunity: Janet Napolitano and the Politics of Latina/o College Choice (Ryan Evely Gildersleeve, Carlos Cruz, Diana Madriz, and Cindy Melendrez-Flores)
ch. 7 Rising Voices: College Opportunity and Choice Among Latina/o Undocumented Students (Patricia A. Pérez, James L. Rodríguez, and Josue Guadarrama)
ch. 8 The Behavioral Typology of First-time Latina/o Students: The Application in Three Hispanic-serving Community Colleges (Lu Liu, Barbara McNeice-Stallard, Dustin Tamashiro, John Barkman, and Lan Hao)
ch. 9 Latina/o Students’ College Destinations: Gender, Generational Status, and College Sector Selectivity (Karla I. Loya, Jihee Hwang, and Leticia Oseguera)
ch. 10 La Selección Latina: Latina/o Students at Selective Four-year Colleges and Universities (Joseph J. Ramirez and Sylvia Hurtado)

Part III: Model College Access & Transition Programs
ch. 11 Rethinking College Access Programs: Latinos, Immigrants, and Community Colleges (Mary Martinez-Wenzl and Patricia Gándara)
ch. 12 Community Cultural Wealth and Latina/o College Choice: The Role of a College Access Program (Brianne A. Dávila and Roseanne M. Macias)
ch. 13 Supporting the College Transition Process and Early Academic Success Through an Integrative Summer Learning Experience (Jermaine F. Williams and Frank E. Ross III)
ch. 14 Conclusion: Toward a New Latina/o College Access and Choice Agenda (Miguel Ceja and Patricia A. Pérez)

Index
Cover image

Missoula: Rape and the Justice System in a College Town

Book
Krakauer, Jon
2015
Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group, New York, NY
HV6568.M57 K73 2015
Topics: Teaching Diversity and Justice   |   Teaching Diverse Students   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
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Undisciplining Knowledge: Interdisciplinarity in the Twentieth Century

Book
Graff, Harvey J.
2015
Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore, MD
LB2361.5.G73 2015
Topics: Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
Interdisciplinarity—or the interrelationships among distinct fields, disciplines, or branches of knowledge in pursuit of new answers to pressing problems—is one of the most contested topics in higher education today. Some see it as a way to break down the silos of academic departments and foster creative interchange, while others view it as a destructive force that will diminish academic quality and destroy the university as we know it. ...
Additional Info:
Interdisciplinarity—or the interrelationships among distinct fields, disciplines, or branches of knowledge in pursuit of new answers to pressing problems—is one of the most contested topics in higher education today. Some see it as a way to break down the silos of academic departments and foster creative interchange, while others view it as a destructive force that will diminish academic quality and destroy the university as we know it. In Undisciplining Knowledge, acclaimed scholar Harvey J. Graff presents readers with the first comparative and critical history of interdisciplinary initiatives in the modern university. Arranged chronologically, the book tells the engaging story of how various academic fields both embraced and fought off efforts to share knowledge with other scholars. It is a story of myths, exaggerations, and misunderstandings, on all sides.

Touching on a wide variety of disciplines—including genetic biology, sociology, the humanities, communications, social relations, operations research, cognitive science, materials science, nanotechnology, cultural studies, literary studies, and biosciences—the book examines the ideals, theories, and practices of interdisciplinarity through comparative case studies. Graff interweaves this narrative with a social, institutional, and intellectual history of interdisciplinary efforts over the 140 years of the modern university, focusing on both its implementation and evolution while exploring substantial differences in definitions, goals, institutional locations, and modes of organization across different areas of focus.

Scholars across the disciplines, specialists in higher education, administrators, and interested readers will find the book’s multiple perspectives and practical advice on building and operating—and avoiding fallacies and errors—in interdisciplinary research and education invaluable. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
List of Tables and Figures
Preface
Acknowledgments
Introduction: The Problem of Interdisciplinarity in Theory and Practice over Time

ch. 1 Sciences of Life and Society in the Making of the Research University: Genetic Biology and Sociology, 1890s-1920s
ch. 2 Crossing and Remaking Boundaries: The Humanities and Communication, 1870s-1960s
ch. 3 In Search of Unification for War and Peace: Social Relations and Operations Research, 1930s-1960s
ch. 4 Between Mind and Mentality: Cognitive Science and New Histories, 1940s-1980s
ch. 5 A Material World and the Making of Lifeworlds: Materials Science and Cultural Studies, 1950s-1990s
ch. 6 The Past and Future of Interdisciplinarity: Bioscience and Literacy Studies

Notes
Select Bibliography
Index
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Those Good Gertrudes: A Social History of Women Teachers in America

Book
Clifford, Geraldine J.
2014
Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore, MD
LB2837.C59 2014
Topics: Diversifying the Faculty   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
Those Good Gertrudes explores the professional, civic, and personal roles of women teachers. Its voice, themes, and findings build from the mostly unpublished writings of many women and their families, colleagues, and pupils. Geraldine J. Clifford studied personal history manuscripts in archives and consulted printed autobiographies, diaries, correspondence, oral histories, interviews—even film and fiction—to probe the multifaceted imagery that has surrounded teaching.

This work stands alone: ...
Additional Info:
Those Good Gertrudes explores the professional, civic, and personal roles of women teachers. Its voice, themes, and findings build from the mostly unpublished writings of many women and their families, colleagues, and pupils. Geraldine J. Clifford studied personal history manuscripts in archives and consulted printed autobiographies, diaries, correspondence, oral histories, interviews—even film and fiction—to probe the multifaceted imagery that has surrounded teaching.

This work stands alone: it is broad ranging, inclusive, and comparative. It surveys a long past where schoolteaching was essentially men's work, with women relegated to restricted niches such as teaching rudiments of the vernacular language to young children and socializing girls for traditional gender roles. Clifford documents and explains the emergence of women as the prototypical schoolteachers in the United States, a process apparent in the late colonial period and continuing through the nineteenth century, when they became the majority of American public and private schoolteachers. She finds that this trend continues in the twenty-first century, despite the diversion of women to competing professions, a precipitous reduction in the number of Roman Catholic nuns, and repeated efforts and incentives to recruit and retain male teachers.

Cross-national comparisons suggest that America's early reliance on women teachers quickened and extended the reach of schools across the nation’s social classes, religious and ethnic groupings, and cultural and physical landscapes.

The capstone of Clifford’s distinguished career, Those Good Gertrudes will engage scholars in the history of education and women’s history, teachers past, present, and future, and readers with vivid memories of their own teachers.

The first woman to receive a Guggenheim Fellowship for research in education, Geraldine J. Clifford is professor emerita at the University of California, Berkeley. Her previous books include Ed School: A Brief for Professional Education. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction

ch. 1 “It Is Well That Women Should Be Unlettered”: Before Teaching School Was “Women’s Work”
ch. 2 “School Dames in Each Quarter”: America’s Army of Gertrudes
ch. 3 “A Sisterhood of Instruction, Essential to the World’s Progress”: Societal Pressures and Women’s Opportunities, 1700-1900
ch. 4 “Overflowing from the Domestic Circle”: Individual and Family Factors in Choosing to Teach
ch. 5 “An Honorable Breadwinning Weapon”: Who Became Teachers?
ch. 6 “The Presiding Genius of His Home and Heart”: Her Marital Status and Domestic Arrangements
ch. 7 “In the Mind’s Eye”: Images and Expectations of the Teacher
ch. 8 “Higher Prospects for a Useful Life”: The Teacher as Trained Professional
ch. 9 “Laboring Conscientiously, Though Perhaps Obscurely”: Certain Realities of Being a Teacher
ch. 10 “The Great Perplexities of the Teacher-Life”: Gertrudes Talk and Their Pupils Reminisce
ch. 11 “That Our Daughters May Be as Cornerstones”: Women Teachers and Messianic America
ch. 12 “The Feast of Reason and Flow of Soul”: The Political Rights and Civic Duties of Women
ch. 13 “A Lady Well Qualified to Show the Way”: Widening Women’s Work

Notes
An Essential Reference Guide
Archives Consulted for the Good Gertrudes Project
Index
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The Urgency of Now: Equity and Excellence

Book
Kolb; Marcus M.; Cargile, Samuel D.; Wood, Jason; Ebrahimi, Nassim; Priddy, Lynne; and Dodge, Lauren, eds.
2015
Rowman & Littlefield, Publishers, Lanham, MD
LB2328.U73 2015
Topics: 18-22 Year Olds   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: With the student body evolving quickly, and the looming challenge of the “completion agenda,” community colleges are facing circumstances like never before in serving all students and propelling them to fulfilling their education aspirations. The Urgency of Now suggests a way forward, with students and their learning at the center of what community colleges, and all of higher education, must do to generate ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: With the student body evolving quickly, and the looming challenge of the “completion agenda,” community colleges are facing circumstances like never before in serving all students and propelling them to fulfilling their education aspirations. The Urgency of Now suggests a way forward, with students and their learning at the center of what community colleges, and all of higher education, must do to generate graduates in possession of high quality degrees and credentials. Through considering comprehensive assessment, new roles for accreditation, faculty engagement strategies, and competency-based education, The Urgency of Now describes our current challenges and the ways we might meet those challenges for the 21st century institution. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Acknowledgments
Introduction: The Urgency of Now: Equity and Excellence (Samuel Cargile)

ch. 1 Making the Case (Jason Wood)
ch. 2 The Accountable Institution from Compliance to Learning (Lynn E. Priddy)
ch. 3 Competency-Based Education (Laurie Dodge)
ch. 4 Integrated Outcomes Assessment (Nassim Ebrahimi)
ch. 5 Engaging Faculty (Marcus M. Kolb)

Epilogue (Marcus M. Kolb and Samuel D. Cargile)
Index
About the Authors
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The Pietist Vision of Christian Higher Education:Forming Whole and Holy Persons

Book
Gehrz, Christopher, ed.
2015
InterVarsity Press, Downers Grove, IL
BV1473.P54 2015
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Pietism has long been ignored in evangelical scholarship. This is especially the case in the field of Christian higher education, which is dominated by thinkers in the Reformed tradition and complicated by the association of Pietism with anti-intellectualism. The irony is that Pietism from the beginning "was intimately bound up with education," according to Diarmaid MacCulloch. But until now there has not been ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Pietism has long been ignored in evangelical scholarship. This is especially the case in the field of Christian higher education, which is dominated by thinkers in the Reformed tradition and complicated by the association of Pietism with anti-intellectualism. The irony is that Pietism from the beginning "was intimately bound up with education," according to Diarmaid MacCulloch. But until now there has not been a single work dedicated to exploring a distinctively Pietist vision for higher education.

In this groundbreaking volume edited by Christopher Gehrz, scholars associated with the Pietist tradition reflect on the Pietist approach to education. Key themes include holistic formation, humility and openmindedness, the love of neighbor, concern for the common good and spiritual maturity. Pietism sees the Christian college as a place that forms whole and holy persons. In a pluralistic and polarized society, such a vision is needed now more than ever. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface (Janel M. Curry)
Acknowledgments (Christopher Gehrz)
Introduction: Does Pietism Provide a "Usable Past" for Christian Colleges and Universities? (Christopher Gehrz)

Part I: Teaching, Scholarship and Community in the Pietist University
ch. 1 Pietism and Faith-Learning Integration in the Evangelical University (David C. Williams)
ch. 2 Calling for Pietistic Community: Pia Desideria in the Classroom (Katherine J. Nevins)
ch. 3 Love and Learning: A Model for Pietist Scholarship in the Disciplines (Jenell Paris)
ch. 4 The Quest for an Evangelical University: The Educational Visions of Carl F. H. Henry and Carl H. Lundquist (Phyllis E. Alsdurf)
ch. 5 Reconceiving the Christ-Centered College: Convertive Piety and Life Together (Roger E. Olson)

Part II: Changed People Changing the World: Pietists and Their Neighbors’ Good
ch. 6 The Common Priesthood Seeking the Common Good (Dale G. Durie)
ch. 7 Pietism and the Practice of Civil Discourse (Christian T. Collins Winn)
ch. 8 Love My (Religious) Neighbor: A Pietist Approach to Christian Responsibility in a Pluralistic World (Marion H. Larson and Sara L. H. Shady)

Part III: Responses: Views from the Natural and Health Sciences
ch. 9 Pietistic Values in Science and Science Education (Richard W. Peterson)
ch. 10 A Pietist Approach to Nursing Education in a Christian University (Nancy L. Olen)

Part IV: Problems and Proposals: Putting the Pietist Vision into Practice
ch. 11 Intellectual Virtue and the Adventurous Christ Follower (Raymond J. VanArragon)
ch. 12 The Pietist Ethos and Organizational Coherency (Joel S. Ward)
ch. 13 Curating the Usable Past for a Vital Future: An Anabaptist Vision for Pietism (Kent T. K. Gerber)
ch. 14 Neoliberal Challenges to the Pietist Vision of Christian Higher Education (Samuel Zalanga)

Conclusion
"Their Mission Is Innovation": The Pietist University in the Twenty-First Century(Christopher Gehrz)
List of Contributors
Name Index
Subject Index
TTR cover image

Signature Pedagogies in Comparative Perspective

TTR
Robinson, Joanne Maguire; Jensen, Tim; Hyland, Áine; Bocking, Brian; Wiseman, Wendy; Kesgin, Burak; Togarasei, Lovemore; Fujiwara, Satoko; Kenney, Jeffrey T.; Cooper, Tim; Yoo, Yohan; Cruz, Eduardo R.; and Soares, Afonso
2015
Teaching Theology and Religion 18, no. 3 (2015): 235-300
BL41.T4 v.18 no. 3 2015
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/teth.2015.18.issue-3/issuetoc
Additional Info:
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/teth.2015.18.issue-3/issuetoc

Table Of Content:
1. Teaching Religion Around the World: A Modest First Glimpse (Joanne Maguire Robinson)
2. The Basic Courses for the Study of Religions at the University of Southern Denmark (Tim Jensen)
3. Religion, Education, and Religious Education in Irish Schools (Áine Hyland and Brian Bocking)
4. Prospects for Religious Studies in Turkey (Wendy A. Wiseman and Burak Kesgin)
5. Teaching and Learning Theology and Religion at the University of Botswana (Lovemore Togarasei)
6. How Religious Studies is Taught in Japan (Satoko Fujiwara)
7. Teaching Religious Studies at the International Islamic University Malaysia (Jeffrey T. Kenney)
8. Teaching Church History in Global Perspective in New Zealand (Tim Cooper)
9. Teaching Religious Studies to Undergraduate Non-Majors at Seoul National University, South Korea (Yohan Yoo)
10. Teaching Religion in Brazil, in Public Schools and Confessional Colleges (Eduardo R. Cruz and Afonso L. Soares)
Article cover image

"Welcoming the Religiously Other to a Catholic University" (pdf)

Article
Gillis, Chester
2013
Integritas 1.3 (Spring 2013), pp. 1-18
Topics: Religious Diversity   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
From its beginnings, Georgetown College welcomed students of all faiths. Today, that imperative finds roots in the Vatican II document Nostra Aetate and serves the good of interreligious dialogue in a globalized world. Georgetown describes its posture as “centered pluralism,” remaining in the Catholic tradition while engaging in conversation with others. An ongoing challenge is how to remain centered in Catholic tradition and at the same time be truly open ...
Additional Info:
From its beginnings, Georgetown College welcomed students of all faiths. Today, that imperative finds roots in the Vatican II document Nostra Aetate and serves the good of interreligious dialogue in a globalized world. Georgetown describes its posture as “centered pluralism,” remaining in the Catholic tradition while engaging in conversation with others. An ongoing challenge is how to remain centered in Catholic tradition and at the same time be truly open to encounter with the religious other. (From the Publisher)
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The Sustainable Learning Community: One University's Journey to the Future

Book
Aber, John; Kelly, Tom; and Mallory, Bruce
2009
University of New Hampshire Press, Lebanon, NH
LD3779.N43 S87 2009
Topics: Teaching Diversity and Justice   |   Alternative Classrooms   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
University communities have the potential to serve as models in the development and application of sustainability principles and practices, not only by what they teach and study, but also by how they operate facilities and engage with off-campus partners. With the oldest endowed campus-wide sustainability program in the country, established in 1997, the University of New Hampshire has become a leader in advancing a campus culture of sustainability. The UNH experience ...
Additional Info:
University communities have the potential to serve as models in the development and application of sustainability principles and practices, not only by what they teach and study, but also by how they operate facilities and engage with off-campus partners. With the oldest endowed campus-wide sustainability program in the country, established in 1997, the University of New Hampshire has become a leader in advancing a campus culture of sustainability. The UNH experience provides a unique window into the development of a new and integrated approach to teaching, learning, research, and operations. It is also a valuable guide for other institutions that aim to enhance the quality of campus life while reducing their environmental footprint. The book’s organization along four functional domains (curriculum, operations, research, and engagement) allows faculty, staff, students, and managers to focus on sections of particular relevance to their university roles. Each chapter develops standards of best practices and presents interesting case studies to humanize the larger effort. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Editor’s Preface (John Aber)

Acknowledgments


ch. 1 Sustainability as an Organizing Principle for Higher Education (Tom Kelly)


ch. 2 Teaching and Learning Sustainability: Curriculum and Pedagogy (John Carroll, ed.)


Curriculum: Biodiversity and Ecosystems

Engaging Students in the Sciences (George Hurtt)

How Does a Local Master of Public Health Program Address Global Emerging Infectious Disease? (Rosemary Caron)

Sustainable Science and Engineering (Kevin Gardner and Nancy Kinner)

UNH-EcoQuest and Sustainability in New Zealand (Te Rarangahau Taiao, Ria Brejaart, Kim Babbitt and Donna Dowal)


Curriculum: Climate and Energy

ESCI 405: Global Environmental Change (Cameron Wake)

The Energy Waste Watch Challenge and Student Energy Captains (Michele Holt-Shannon and Sara Cleaves)

Organizing a Curriculum on the Environment—Inclusiveness or Security? (John Aber)

Science, Politics, and Policy from Global to Local in an Undergraduate Seminar (Stacy Van Deveer)


Curriculum: Food and Society

Dual Major in EcoGastronomy (Joanne Currancelentano)

Integrating Sustainability into the Professional Development of Dietetic Interns (Joanne Burke)

“The Real Dirt” (John E. Carroll)

UNH Cream (Drew Conroy and Peter Erickson)


Curriculum: Culture and Sustainability

The Promise of the Sun (Tom Kelly)

Artistic Engagement—Discovering and Developing a Theatrical Response to Sustainability (David Kaye)

The University Dialogue and a Sense of Place (Joanne Curran-Celentano)

How the Sustainable Living Minor Came to Be (Robert Eckert and Bert Cohen)


ch. 3 Practicing Sustainability: Campus Operations (Douglas Bencks, ed.)


Operations: Biodiversity and Ecosystems

Landscape Master Plan (Douglas Bencks)

Land Use Committee (Tom Lee)

The MUB Meadow (John L. Hart)


Operations: Climate and Energy

It’s Risky Business Doing the Right Thing—The Co-Gen Plant and EcoLine (Paul Chamberlin and Matt O’Keefe)

Transportation and Land Use (Steve Pesci)

The UNH Greenhouse Gas Inventory (Brett Pasinella)

The Energy Task Force—A Cross-Campus Collaboration to Address Climate Change (Sara Cleaves)


Operations: Food and Society

The UNH Compost Program—From Waste to Compost (Elisabeth Farrell and Rick MacDonald)

Acting Locally—The UNH Local Harvest Initiative (Elisabeth Farrell and Rick MacDonald)

Innovative Dining Hall Hours and Plate Waste (Rick MacDonald)


Operations: Culture and Sustainability

Developing Our Sense of Place—The Role of the Committee for Campus Aesthetics (Vicki C. Wright)

Sustainable Building Design (Douglas Bencks)

Moving the Kingsbury Mural (Douglas Bencks)

Sustainable Buildings—Do You Want Fries with Your Building? No Thank You! (Douglas Bencks)


ch. 4 Creating the Intellectual Basis for Sustainability Research and Scholarship (John Aber and Cameron Wake, ed.)


Research on Biodiversity and Ecosystems

Cooperative Institute for Coastal and Estuarine Environmental Technology (Rich Langan and Dolores Leonard)

The History of Marine Animal Populations (Andrew Rosenberg, Jeff Bolster, Karen Alexander, and Bill Leavenworth)

The Stormwater Research Center (Tom Ballestero)

Oyster Restoration—Planning, Research, and Implementation in New Hampshire (Ray Grizzle)


Research on Climate and Energy

The Institute for the Study of Earth, Oceans, and Space (David S. Bartlett)

The Environmental Research Group (Kevin Gardner and Taylor Eighmy)

Multidisciplinary Design Competition (Jenna Jambeck and Kevin Gardner)

Regional Climate Assessments—Supporting Informed Public Policy (Cameron Wake)


Research on Food and Society

The UNH Organic Dairy Research Farm (John E. Carroll and Tom Kelly)

The Atlantic Marine Aquaculture Center (Rich Langan and Dolores Leonard)

The UNH Community Food, Nutrition, and Wellness Profile (Joanne Burke)

From Campus Farm to Dining Hall (John McLean)


Research on Culture and Sustainability

The Undergraduate Research Conference—A Key Ingredient in the Sustainable Learning Community (Eleanor Abrams)

The Carsey Institute—Building Knowledge to Support Opportunity for Families in Sustainable Communities (Mil Duncan)

The Growing a Green Generation Project (John Nimmo)


ch. 5 Sustaining the Larger Community: Engagement (Jeffrey A. Schloss, ed.)


Engagement in Biodiversity and Ecosystems

The New Hampshire Lakes Lay Monitoring Program—A Sustainable Model for Engaging Citizens (Jeffrey A. Schloss)

Forest Watch—Enhancing Pre-College Understanding of Biodiversity and Ecosystems (Barry Rock)

The UNH Marine Docent Program (Mark Wiley)

Students Without Borders (Jenna Jambeck and Kevin Gardner)


Engagement in Climate and Energy

Collaboration for a Low-Carbon Society—Carbon Solutions New England (Cameron Wake)

The New Hampshire Carbon Challenge (Chris Skoglund, Denise Blaha, and Julia Dundorf)

WildCAP Discount Program (Brett Pasinella)

Informing Public Policy—Engagement on Climate with the State of New Hampshire (Cameron Wake)


Engagement in Food and Society

The New Hampshire Farm to School Program (Elisabeth Farrell and Lynda Brushett)

Cooperative Fisheries Research—The Innovative Fisherman (Ken LaValley)

The Organic Garden Club (Rebecca Grube)

New Hampshire Center for a Food Secure Future (Elisabeth Farrell)


Engagement in Culture and Sustainability

Deliberation in the Civic Sector—The Role of Higher Education in Sustaining Democracy (Bruce L. Mallory)

Building a Sustainable Community of Engaged Scholars—The UNH Outreach Scholars Academy (Julie E. Williams, Eleanor Abrams, and Christine Shea)

Portsmouth Black Heritage Trail (Valerie Cunningham)

Four Hands, One Heart—Ed and Mary Scheier Documentary and Exhibit (Tom Kelly)


ch. 6 How the Sustainability Ethic Developed at UNH and the Next Phase of our “Journey to the Future” (Sara Cleaves, Tom Kelly, and John Aber)


Contributors
Index
Additional Info:
Additional Info:
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Incarcerated Religion: Teaching behind Walls - Editor’s Introduction

Journal Issue
Glennon, Frederick, ed.
2016
Spotlight on Teaching, May 31,
BL41.S72
Topics: Teaching Diversity and Justice   |   Teaching Diverse Students   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here: http://rsn.aarweb.org/spotlight-on/teaching/incarcerated-religion/editor%E2%80%99s-introduction
Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here: http://rsn.aarweb.org/spotlight-on/teaching/incarcerated-religion/editor%E2%80%99s-introduction

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Incarcerated Religion: Teaching behind Walls – Editor's Introduction (Fred Glennon)
ch. 2 Opening My Eyes: Teaching in a Women's Prison (Elizabeth M. Bounds)
ch. 3 Education as Social Transformation (Andrew Skotnicki)
ch. 4 Incarcerated Trust: The Challenge of Prison Teaching (James Wetzel)
ch. 5 Quotes, Notes, Questions (Joshua Dubler)
ch. 6 Theology and Ministry at Garden State Correctional Facility (Melanie Webb)

Resources
Cover image

Creating Citizens: Liberal Arts, Civic Engagement, and the Land-Grant Tradition

Book
Brunner, Brigitta R.
2016
University of Alabama Press, Tuscaloosa, AL
LC220.5.C698 2016
Topics: Academic Histories and Contexts   |   Civic Engagement

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
In Creating Citizens, professors and administrators at Auburn University’s College of Liberal Arts recount valuable, first-hand experiences teaching Community and Civic Engagement (CCE). They demonstrate that, contrary to many expectations, CCE instruction both complements the mission of liberal arts curricula and powerfully advances the fundamental mission of American land-grand institutions.

The nine essays in Creating Citizens offer structures for incorporating CCE ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
In Creating Citizens, professors and administrators at Auburn University’s College of Liberal Arts recount valuable, first-hand experiences teaching Community and Civic Engagement (CCE). They demonstrate that, contrary to many expectations, CCE instruction both complements the mission of liberal arts curricula and powerfully advances the fundamental mission of American land-grand institutions.

The nine essays in Creating Citizens offer structures for incorporating CCE initiatives into university programs, instructional methods and techniques, and numerous case studies and examples undertaken at Auburn University but applicable at any university. Many contributors describe their own rewarding experiences with CCE and emphasize the ways outreach efforts reinvigorate their teaching or research.

Creating Citizens recounts the foundation of land-grant institutions by the Morrill Act of 1862. Their mission is to instruct in agriculture, military science, and mechanics, but these goals augmented rather than replaced an education in the classics, or liberal arts. Land-grant institutions, therefore, have a special calling to provide a broad spectrum of society with an education that not only enriched the personal lives of their students, but the communities they are a part of. Creating Citizens demonstrates the important opportunities CCE instruction represents to any university but are especially close to the heart of the mission of land-grant colleges.

In open societies, the role and mission of public institutions of higher learning that are supported by public subsidies are perennial subjects of interest and debate. Creating Citizens provides valuable insights of interest to educators, education administrators, students, and policy makers involved in the field of higher education. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction (Brigitta R. Brunner)

I. Structures Designed to Support Community and Civic Engagement
ch. 1 Engaged Scholarship’s Place within the Tenure and Promotion Process (Brigitta R. Brunner)
ch. 2 A Profile of a University Community and Civic Engagement Political Science Internship (William E. Kelly)

II. Community and Civic Engagement Method and Technique
ch. 3 Community Inquiry in the Writing Classroom: Bridging Liberal Arts and Education with the Work of Civic Engagement (Chad Wickman)
ch. 4 Bridges across Wire (Kyes Stevens with James Emmett Ryan)
ch. 5 An Exploration of Outreach Opportunities for College German Programs in Alabama (Iulia Pittman and Anne-Katrin Gramberg)

III. Community and Civic Engagement Examples
ch. 6 Nobody is Telling Our Story (Nan Fairley)
ch. 7 Culturing Connection, Growing Community: The Art in Agriculture Initiative (Christopher McNulty and Barb Bondy)
ch. 8 Group Parent-Child Interaction Therapy: Community-Based Research with a Family Focus (Elizabeth Brestan-Knight and Timothy S. Thornberry, Jr.)
ch. 9 Community and Civic Engagement, Civil Society, and Anthropological Research in India (Kelly D. Alley)

Conclusion (Brigitta R. Brunner)
Contributors
Cover image

Seminary Formation: Recent History-Current Circumstances-New Directions

Book
Schuth, Katarina
2016
Liturgical Press, Collegeville, MN
BX905.S425 2016
Topics: Theological Education   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
The past thirty years have witnessed tremendous societal and ecclesial changes that continue to inform ministry education in the 21st century. In Seminary Formation, Katarina Schuth, OSF, examines the many aspects of theologate-level schools including their structures and missions, organization and leadership, student enrollment, backgrounds of both seminarians and lay students, and the evolution and development of degree programs, including human and spiritual, intellectual and pastoral formation. Seminary Formation also ...
Additional Info:
The past thirty years have witnessed tremendous societal and ecclesial changes that continue to inform ministry education in the 21st century. In Seminary Formation, Katarina Schuth, OSF, examines the many aspects of theologate-level schools including their structures and missions, organization and leadership, student enrollment, backgrounds of both seminarians and lay students, and the evolution and development of degree programs, including human and spiritual, intellectual and pastoral formation. Seminary Formation also helpfully includes substantial commentaries on Schuth's research by Ronald Rolheiser, Thomas Walters, Leon M. Hutton, Barbara Reid, and Peter Vaccari.

An exploration of the changes in seminaries and schools of theology, with statistical analysis, from 1985 to the present, Seminary Formation anticipates the challenges ahead and considers new directions for the future. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
List of Tables
Foreword by Archbishop Blase J. Cupich
Acknowledgments
Frequently Used Documents, Abbreviations and Terms

Part I Context
Introduction
ch. 1 The Effects of Vatican II on the Present State of Seminaries and Theologates

Part II Organization and Personnel
ch. 2 Mission, Vision, and Structures
ch. 3 Leadership: Boards, Administration, and Faculty

Part III Students Preparing for Ministry: Enrollment and Programs
ch. 4 Seminarians and Lay Students
ch. 5 Human and Spiritual Formation Developments
ch. 6 Intellectual and Pastoral Formation Programs

Part IV Conclusion and Commentaries
ch. 7 New Directions in the Future
Toward a Spirituality of Ecclesial Leadership (Ronald Rotheiser, OMI)
General Differences: A Crucial Key (Thomas Walters)
Human Formation: Fostering Happy, Healthy, and Holy Ministers to Be a Bridge to Christ in Service to God’s People (Leon M. Hutton)
Trends in Scripture Study and Preaching Preparation in Roman Catholic Seminaries (Barbara E. Reid)
The Culture of Encounter: The Future of Seminary Formation (Msgr. Peter Vaccari)

Appendices
Bibliography
Index
TTR cover image
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Topics: 18-22 Year Olds   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
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Additional Info:
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Table Of Content:
table of contents 456
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Book
Testing Tester
2002
Test Co.
Topics: Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
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Additional Info:
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