Selected Items - 17 results

Sort by:
Close Filter Panel
Cover image

Critical Pedagogy and Marx, Vygotsky and Freire: Phenomenal Forms and Educational Action Research

Book
Villacañas de Castro, Luis S.
2016
Palgrave Macmillan, New York, NY
LC196.V55 2016
Topics: Critical Pedagogies

Additional Info:
This book explores Marx's theory of the phenomenal forms in relation to critical pedagogy and educational action research, arguing that phenomenal forms pose a pedagogical obstacle to any endeavour that seeks to expand an individual's awareness of the larger social whole. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
This book explores Marx's theory of the phenomenal forms in relation to critical pedagogy and educational action research, arguing that phenomenal forms pose a pedagogical obstacle to any endeavour that seeks to expand an individual's awareness of the larger social whole. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction: The Pedagogical Obstacle of the Phenomenal Forms

Part I - Marx, Freud, and Pedagogy
ch. 1 Beyond The Ignorant Schoolmaster: On Education, Marxism, and Psychoanalysis

Part II - Epistemology, Critical Pedagogy, and Liberal Principles
ch. 2 The Pedagogical Problem: Vygotsky’s Encounter with Marx’s Phenomenal Forms
ch. 3 The Pedagogical Solution: Freire’s Critical Pedagogy and Social Democracy

Part III - Theory and Practice of Educational Action Research
ch. 4 The Critical Potential of John Elliott’s Liberal Pedagogy
ch. 5 A Practical Case of Participatory Meta-Action Research

References
Index
Cover image

Teacher, Scholar, Mother: Re-Envisioning Motherhood in the Academy

Book
Young, Anna M., ed.
2015
Rowman & Littlefield, Publishers, Lanham, MD
HQ759.48.T43 2015
Topics: Faculty Well-Being   |   Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
Teacher, Scholar, Mother advances a more productive conversation across disciplines on motherhood through its discussion on intersecting axes of power and privilege. This multi- and trans-disciplinary book features mother scholars who bring their theoretical and disciplinary lenses to bear on questions of identity, practice, policy, institutional memory, progress, and the gendered notion of parenting that still pervades the modern academy. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Teacher, Scholar, Mother advances a more productive conversation across disciplines on motherhood through its discussion on intersecting axes of power and privilege. This multi- and trans-disciplinary book features mother scholars who bring their theoretical and disciplinary lenses to bear on questions of identity, practice, policy, institutional memory, progress, and the gendered notion of parenting that still pervades the modern academy. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Section One: Approaches to Motherhood, Feminism and Gendered Work
ch. 1 The Role of Theory in Understanding the Lived Experiences of Mothering in the Academy (Andrea N. Hunt)
ch. 2 Crying over “Split Milk”: How Divisive Language on Infant Feeding Leads to Stress, Confusion and Anxiety for Mothers (Tracy Rundstrom Williams)
ch. 3 Mama’s Boy: Feminist Mothering, Masculinity, and White Privilege (Catherine A.F. MacGillivray)
ch. 4 Encountering Others: Reading, Writing, Teaching, Parenting (Erin Tremblay Ponnou-Delaffon)
ch. 5 A Qualitative Study of Academic Mothers’ Sabbatical Experiences: Considering Disciplinary Differences (Susan V. Iverson, Christin Seher)
ch. 6 Motherhood: Reflection, Design, and Self-Authorship (Brook Sattler, Jennifer Turns, Cynthia J. Atman)
ch. 7 Confessions of a Buzzkill: Critical Feminist Parenting in the Age of Omnipresent Media (Dustin Harp)

Section Two: Identity and Performance in Academic Motherhood
ch. 8 More Mother than Others: Disorientations, Motherscholars, and Objects in Becoming (Sara M. Childers)
ch. 9 Doing Research and Teaching on Masculinities and Violence: One Mother of Sons’ Perspective (M. Cristine Alcalde)
ch. 10 Cultural Border Crossings between Science, Science Pedagogy & Parenting (Allison Antink-Meyer)
ch. 11 “You Must be Superwoman!”: How Graduate Student Mothers Negotiate Conflicting Roles (Erin Graybill Ellis, Jessica Smartt Gullion)
ch. 12 “There’s a Monster Growing in our Heads”: Mad Men’s Betty Draper, Fan Reaction, and Twenty-First Century Anxiety about Motherhood (Caroline Smith, Celeste Hanna)

Section Three: Bringing it to Light: Giving Voice to Motherhood’s Challenges
ch. 13 Silence and the Stillbirth Narrative: Stories Worth Telling (Elisabeth G. Kraus)
ch. 14 S/m/othering (Marissa McClure)
ch. 15 A Tapestry of Sweet Mother(hood): African Scholar, Mother, and Performer? (Ama Oforiwaa Aduonum)
ch. 16 Dropped Stitches: Classrooms, Caregiving, and Cancer (Martha Kalnin Diede)
ch. 17 The Other Female Complaint: Online Narratives of Assisted Reproductive Therapy as Sentimental Literature (Layne Craig)
ch. 18 Mama’s Boy Part II: Feminism, Masculinity, and Life in an Interracial Family (Catherine A.F. MacGillivray)
Cover image

The Scholarship of Teaching and Learning in Canada Institutional Impact

Book
Simmons, Nicola, ed.
2016
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA (New Directions for Teaching and Learning, Number 146)
LA417.7.S36 2016
Topics: Writing the Scholarship of Teaching   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Develop effective models of practice and positively impact institutional teaching and learning quality. This volume provides examples and evidence of the ways in which post-secondary institutions in Canada have developed and sustained programs around the scholarship of teaching and learning (SoTL) that impact the institutional pedagogical climate. Topics include:

- the historical development of SoTL in Canada,
- institutional SoTL practices, including evidence of impact,
- ...
Additional Info:
Develop effective models of practice and positively impact institutional teaching and learning quality. This volume provides examples and evidence of the ways in which post-secondary institutions in Canada have developed and sustained programs around the scholarship of teaching and learning (SoTL) that impact the institutional pedagogical climate. Topics include:

- the historical development of SoTL in Canada,
- institutional SoTL practices, including evidence of impact,
- program design and case studies, and
- continuing challenges with this work.

This is the 146th volume of this Jossey-Bass higher education series. It offers a comprehensive range of ideas and techniques for improving college teaching based on the experience of seasoned instructors and the latest findings of educational and psychological researchers. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Editor’s Notes (Nicola Simmons)
Foreword (Nancy Chick)

Section One: Canadian Context
ch. 1 The History of SoTL in Canada: Answering Calls for Action (Nicola Simmons, Gary Poole)
This chapter provides an account of the historical development of SoTL in Canada, including recommendations for moving forward

ch. 2 The Canadian Teaching Commons: The Scholarship of Teaching and Learning in Canadian Higher Education (Brad Wuetheric, Stan Yu)
This chapter maps the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL) terrain in Canada through the perceptions of SoTL scholars at four levels (micro, meso, macro, mega)

Section Two: Program Design And Evaluation
ch. 3 The Intentional Design of a SoTL Initiative (Cheryl Amundsen, Esma Emmioglu, Veronica Hotton, Gregory Hum, Cindy Xin)
This chapter outlines how rationale and description of a program design are the underpinnings to evaluate any Scholarship of Teaching and Learning initiative and shows how this supports building on prior practice

ch. 4 The Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL) at Renaissance College (University of New Brunswick): A Case Study of SoTL at the Faculty Level (Thomas Mengel)
This chapter discusses how a university college moves SoTL forward by aligning with the larger institution and taking advantage of SoTLfriendly existing promotion and tenure policies

ch. 5 Developing the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning at the McMaster Institute for Innovation and Excellence in Teaching and Learning (Elizabeth Marquis, Arshad Ahmad)
This chapter outlines how research fellow positions, engagement of students as co-inquirers, and mapping priority areas for scholarship have the potential for substantial impact on institutional teaching, learning, and SOTL

Section Three: Exploring the Impact of SoTL Initiatives
ch. 6 SoTL2: Inquiring into the Impact of Inquiry (Janice Miller-Young, Michelle Yeo, Karen Manarin, Miriam Carey, Jim Zimmer)
This chapter examines the impact of Mount Royal’s SoTL program on participants’ scholarship at individual, department, and institutional levels as the institution moved from a college to a university

ch. 7 Exploring the SoTL Landscape at the University of Saskatchewan (Brad Wuetherick, Stan Yu, Jim Greer)
This chapter examines who conducts Scholarship of Teaching and Learning, and to what extent, at the University of Saskatchewan and what barriers and challenges impede SoTL work

ch. 8 Reconceptualizing the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning at the University of Waterloo: An Account of Influences and Impact (Julie A. Timmermans, Donna E. Ellis) This chapter outlines how one institution capitalized on events to move from a focus on SoTL to scholarly teaching and discusses the resulting benefits to the culture of teaching and learning

Section Four: Institutionally Networked SoTL
ch. 9 The Role of Small Significant Networks and Leadership in the Institutional Embedding of SoTL (Roselynn Verwoord, Gary Poole)
This chapter builds on notions of social networks, showing how consideration of their nature, relationships between them, and support for them can help create a positive teaching culture

ch. 10 Building Sustained Action: Supporting an Institutional Practice of SoTL at the University of Guelph (Natasha Kenny, Gavan P.L. Watson, Serge Desmarais)
This chapter outlines the symbiotic relationship between engagement in SoTL and a teaching-focused institutional culture, identifying the importance of committed leaders, rewards and recognition, and integrated networks at all organizational levels

Section Five: Synthesis
ch. 11 Synthesizing SoTL Institutional Initiatives toward National Impact (Nicola Simmons)
This chapter draws together the themes in this issue and outlines a model for building from institutional SoTL impact to national initiatives

Index
Cover image

Constructivism Reconsidered in the Age of Social Media

Book
Stabile, Chris, and Ershler, Jeff, eds.
2015
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA (New Directions for Teaching and Learning, Number 144)
LB2395.7.C66 2015
Topics: Using Technology   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory

Additional Info:
No longer relegated to just the classroom, learning has become universal through the use of social media. Social media embodies constructivism itself as the users engage in the development of their own meaning. And, constructivism is relevant to education, and learning theory and technological advance can be better understood in the light of one another.
This volume explores:

- particular areas influenced by constructivist thinking and social ...
Additional Info:
No longer relegated to just the classroom, learning has become universal through the use of social media. Social media embodies constructivism itself as the users engage in the development of their own meaning. And, constructivism is relevant to education, and learning theory and technological advance can be better understood in the light of one another.
This volume explores:

- particular areas influenced by constructivist thinking and social media, such as student learning, faculty development, and pedagogical practices,
- practical and useful ways to engage in social media, and
- dialogue and discussions regarding the nature of learning in relation to the technology that has changed how both faculty and students experience their educational landscape.

This is the 144th volume of this Jossey-Bass higher education series. It offers a comprehensive range of ideas and techniques for improving college teaching based on the experience of seasoned instructors and the latest findings of educational and psychological researchers. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Editors’ Notes (Chris Stabile, Jeff Ershler)

ch. 1 The Learning Virus: An Affective, Constructivist Movement Shaped by Ultrasociality in the Age of Social Media (Jeff Ershler, Chris Stabile)
Redefining the discourse toward a “better fit” cultural framework of beliefs, thought, language, and action through ultrasociality, a constructivist meme can help nurture an epistemological break (or rupture) from the traditional objectivist paradigm in education.

ch. 2 Constructivism and Learning in the Age of Social Media: Changing Minds and Learning Communities (Dawn E. Schrader)
Social media provide new means and opportunities for learning that are consistent with major tenets of both social and cognitive constructivism, and extend the process of learning and meaning construction to more diverse communities and universally accessible shared activities that are jointly and concurrently engaged in by both peers and experts.

ch. 3 Leveraging Social Media for Instructional Goals: Status, Possibilities, and Concerns (Mark Taylor)
This chapter addresses issues faculty should consider when exploring the possible use of social media in instruction with today’s learners.

ch. 4 Teaching Students to Think Critically About Social Media (Stephen D. Brookfield)
Instructors can incorporate social media and the immediacy and accessibility to information these offer in ways that support student learning, while simultaneously encouraging students to be critical of these same media systems and platforms.

ch. 5 Learner-Centered Online Instruction (Barbara McCombs)
This chapter offers a theoretical rationale and an explanation of evidence for using research-validated, learner-centered principles and practices in online course development, highlighting the evidence based practices that have been used successfully to develop online courses that engage and retain students.

ch. 6 Implications of Graphic Organizers in an Age of Social Media (Michael Record)
This chapter deconstructs the definition of graphic organizer, reimagining it for a social media age, leading to a more mindful use of the concept as an entire approach to teaching and learning rather than one specific set of tools.

ch. 7 How Critical Reflection Benefits Faculty as They Implement Learner-Centered Teaching (Phyllis Blumberg)
Critical reflection assists faculty as they transition to using learner centered approaches. When this reflection occurs within the context of social media, they can obtain reinforcing feedback and support.

ch. 8 Learner-Centered Faculty Development (Kevin Yee)
To maximize their effectiveness, faculty developers should not merely advocate for an active learning approach but also enact it in their own workshops and service-oriented interactions with faculty, even extending to their use of outreach and social media.

ch. 9 Toward Education 3.0: Pedagogical Affordances and Implications of Social Software and the Semantic Web (Mark Allison, Lynn Marie Kendrick)
This chapter explores the implications of this new educational paradigm from a technical standpoint and proposes a constructivist aware approach to best leverage its significance.

Index
Cover image

The Balancing Act: International Higher Education in the 21st Century

Book
Saudelli, Mary Gene
2015
Sense Publishers, The Netherlands
LC1090.S28 2015
Topics: Changes in Higher Education

Additional Info:
Why is it important to learn about higher education in international contexts? Why learn about curriculum, teaching, and learning at Dubai Women’s College of the Higher Colleges of Technology? Global education systems have remarkable contributions to make to understandings of 21st century curriculum, teaching, and learning.

Adult educators across the globe are exploring how to make learning meaningful in a world that is experiencing change, global migration, ...
Additional Info:
Why is it important to learn about higher education in international contexts? Why learn about curriculum, teaching, and learning at Dubai Women’s College of the Higher Colleges of Technology? Global education systems have remarkable contributions to make to understandings of 21st century curriculum, teaching, and learning.

Adult educators across the globe are exploring how to make learning meaningful in a world that is experiencing change, global migration, rapid development, cross-cultural communication demands, and systems with mandates for accountability and international standardized measures of quality. Dubai is an Emirate in the United Arab Emirates that has experienced these issues, which have had a profound impact on higher education for Emirati women.

The international educators who contributed to this book reveal how they designed and implemented a curriculum that represented a complex balancing act replete with recognition of local, global, religious, cultural, and societal implications. There is no other book like The Balancing Act: International Higher Education in the 21st Century. It reveals the nature of a highly devoted team of international educators who designed a contextually and globally relevant transdisciplinary, 21st century curriculum.

“Dr. Mary Gene Saudelli has tremendous knowledge and experience with delivering world class education in the Middle East. She has a deep commitment to progressive education and an understanding of global mindedness. It is wonderful that she shares her research on a wide range of topics in educational curriculum and global issues. In The Balancing Act: International Higher Education in the 21st Century, Dr. Saudelli opens the dialogue of reciprocity in learning from higher education in diverse contexts. This book honours Emirati women’s backgrounds and differences, yet cherishes the uniqueness of the international educators involved in this study.” – Kim Critchley, Dean and CEO, University of Calgary in Qatar (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword (Jennifer Rowsell)

Module 1: Exploring the Context and the Theories
ch. 1 Setting the Stage: Introducing Dubai Women’s College and the United Arab Emirates
ch. 2 Constructive Learning Theory and Contemporary Debates
ch. 3 Adult Learners, Sociology of Education and Change Theories

Module 2: Presenting the Educators, Learners and Curriculum
ch. 4 Introducing the International Educators
ch. 5 Introducing 21st Century Teaching & Learning and the Emirati Learners
ch. 6 Making Learning Meaningful: Trans-Disciplinary 21st Century Curriculum

Module 3: Delving into the Learning Context, Religion, Culture, Society and Language
ch. 7 Encountering Islam in the Classroom: Faith and 21st Century Curriculum
ch. 8 Balancing Issues and Exploring Boundaries: Emirati Culture and 21st Century Curriculum
ch. 9 Globalization on Steroids: 21st Century Curriculum and Societal Change in Dubai
ch. 10 English - A Global Language

Conclusion
ch. 11 Capturing 21st Century Curriculum Design in Practice: What Can Be Learned from Higher Education at DWC?

Appendix A: Current Issues Forum: Booth Allocations
Appendix B: Reading Assessments Texts
References
Cover image

Transformative Learning and Adult Higher Education

Book
Cohen, Judith Beth; Gammel, Jo Ann; and Rustein-Riley, Amy, eds.
2016
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA (New Directions for Teaching and Learning, Number 147)
LC5219.T72 2016
Topics: Adult Learners   |   Teaching for Transformation

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Presenting current trends in transformative learning and adult higher education, this volume paints a vivid picture of the Transformative Learning theory in action. The concepts that knit these articles together despite the variety of educational settings and populations are: relationships, community, and the body experience - often missing in higher education.

This volume includes:
- the voices of marginalized populations often ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Presenting current trends in transformative learning and adult higher education, this volume paints a vivid picture of the Transformative Learning theory in action. The concepts that knit these articles together despite the variety of educational settings and populations are: relationships, community, and the body experience - often missing in higher education.

This volume includes:
- the voices of marginalized populations often excluded from research studies such as community college students, emerging adults with learning differences, English language learners, native Alaskans, African-American health educators, doctoral students, and yoga practitioners;
- new paradigms for thinking about adult undergraduate education;
- new ways to deal with social conflict and advise doctoral students; and
- personal stories from Black women leaders, college teachers, student writers as well as pregnant women, and social service providers.

This is the 147th volume of this Jossey-Bass higher education series. It offers a comprehensive range of ideas and techniques for improving college teaching based on the experience of seasoned instructors and the latest findings of educational and psychological researchers. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Editors’ Notes (Judith Beth Cohen, Jo Ann Gammel, Amy Rutstein-Riley)

ch. 1 The Spiral Road of Transformative Learning: Through the Lens of College Students with Learning Differences (Lynn Abrahams)
This chapter explores how college students with diagnosed learning differences develop identity within the family system.

ch. 2 Transformative Learning and the Road to Maternal Leadership (Rachel Panton)
This study of three African-American holistic health educators shows how their woman-centered learning cultures influenced their personal transformations and leadership roles.

ch. 3 A Relational Approach to Mentoring Women Doctoral Students (Jo Ann Gammel, Amy Rutstein-Riley)
In an examination of six dyads of women advisors and advisees in one doctoral program, the authors found that a relational model for mentoring women can be an alternative to the authority-based approach most common to doctoral work.

ch. 4 Examining Transformation on the Road to the Professoriate (Anne C. Benoit)
In this chapter, two college teachers, an African-American woman and a White man, identify pivotal events in their development as educators.

ch. 5 Whose Job Is It to Change? (Kathryn L. Nielsen)
Co-director of a college writing center proposes a plan for insitutional change that honors the voices of English language learners rather than expecting them to adjust to the dominant instituational culture.

ch. 6 Making Voices Visible: Using Visual Data in Teacher Education and Research (Debra Murphy)
This chapter describes changes in the thinking and practice of eight early childhood teachers after they used visual data to complete a teacher research assignment in a community college teacher education course.

ch. 7 Teaching Creative Nonfiction: The Transformative Nature of the Workshop Method (Suzanne Cope)
A writer and teacher of nonfiction examines the widely used workshop method to show how student writers gain greater control over their choice of language, and insight into the meaning of their writing.

ch. 8 Transformative Graduate Education Through the Use of Restorative Practices (John W. Bailie, Craig W. Adamson)
As professors and administrators in a graduate program based upon Restorative Justice, these authors show how classroom pedagogy can model alternatives that promote personal and professional transformation.

ch. 9 Adult Learning, Transformative Education, and Indigenous Epistemology (Diane McEachern)
A social worker, teaching in an undergraduate satellite program in Alaska, explores how a culturally resonant degree program can overcome the barriers faced by native Yupik women attending college.

ch. 10 Iyengar Yoga for Motherhood: Teaching Transformation in a Nonformal Learning Environment (Amy Tate)
A yoga teacher and practitioner explores the widespread phenomenon of yoga by focusing on its empowering effects for pregnant women and its implications for challenging the traditional medical model.

ch. 11 Embodying Authenticity in Higher Education (Laura Douglass)
The author explores how listening to the wisdom of her body was a primary method she used to interpret the competing demands and disorienting dilemmas of scholarship, teaching, and administration.

Index
Cover image

Enhancing Teaching and Learning Through Collaborative Structures

Book
Bernstein, Jeffrey L., and Flinders, Brooke A., eds.
2016
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA (New Directions for Teaching and Learning, Number 148)
LB2331.E64 2016
Topics: Collaborative Learning

Additional Info:
In this volume, the authors contend that teaching and learning must be viewed as communal work, whether conducted in one classroom, with colleagues at a programmatic level, or when tackled on a university-wide scale. When educators partner with faculty colleagues or students in teaching and learning, it becomes possible to:

- improve the educational experiences of all students,
- model professional behaviors that students will soon be ...
Additional Info:
In this volume, the authors contend that teaching and learning must be viewed as communal work, whether conducted in one classroom, with colleagues at a programmatic level, or when tackled on a university-wide scale. When educators partner with faculty colleagues or students in teaching and learning, it becomes possible to:

- improve the educational experiences of all students,
- model professional behaviors that students will soon be expected to embrace, and
- positively impact graduates, peers, campuses, and even communities at large.

By intentionally creating collaborative structures for communal work to occur, educators can broaden access to opportunities for students, improve engagement experiences within the community, and improve faculty support and scholarship.

Exploring multiple perspectives on collaborative structures in teaching and learning, this volume discusses ways to consider the collaborative structures within education that allow for shared contributions to teaching and learning. It discusses the need for practitioners to view teaching and learning as truly communal work, regardless of the type of setting.

This is the 148th volume of this Jossey-Bass higher education series. It offers a comprehensive range of ideas and techniques for improving college teaching based on the experience of seasoned instructors and the latest findings of educational and psychological researchers. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction (Jeffrey L. Bernstein, Brooke A. Flinders)

ch. 1 Learning in the Company of Others: Students and Teachers Collaborating to Support Wonder, Unease, and Understanding (Richard A. Gale)
Embracing a shared vision of truly collaborative learning and teaching practice provides students and faculty alike with a richer understanding of the value and potential of working together. Refining roles and expectations allows students to build confidence through disequilibrium and discourse, if we are willing to embrace the risk inherent in these revised collaborative roles.

ch. 2 How Students, Collaborating as Peer Mentors, Enabled an Audacious Group-Based Project (Jeffrey L. Bernstein, Andrew P. Abad, Benjamin C. Bower, Sara E. Box, Hailey L. Huckestein, Steven M. Mikulic, Brian F. Walsh)
The presence of peer mentors enabled a complex project to be implemented in a Campaigns and Elections class, and helped the professor develop a sustainable model that could be used in future iterations of the course.

ch. 3 The Development of a High-Impact Structure: Collaboration in a Service-Learning Program (Brooke A. Flinders, Matthew Dameron, Katherine Kava)
The high-impact educational practices, recommended by the Association of American Colleges and Universities, are embedded in an undergraduate service-learning program and leadership team design.

ch. 4 Collaborative Structures in a Graduate Program (Robyn Otty, Lauren Milton)
Collaboration that extends beyond an individual course creates community, continuity, and leadership opportunities for students in a graduate program.

ch. 5 Exploring Academia: Professionalization and Undergraduate Collaboration (Ellen G. Galantucci, Erin Marie-Sergison Krcatovich)
An undergraduate experience working on a scholarship of teaching and learning project with a professor can have a positive impact on the career development of graduate students and future faculty.

ch. 6 Collaborating in Dialogue for an Optimal Leadership Education (Carmen Werder, Joseph Garcia, Jamie Bush, Caroline Dallstream)
Leadership education at Western Washington University is examined through four different lenses, each revealing important lessons for how leaders are made or revealed, and the role they play in facilitating dialogue around teaching and learning.

ch. 7 Four Positions of Leadership in Planning, Implementing, and Sustaining Faculty Learning Community Programs (Milton D. Cox)
Faculty Learning Communities (FLCs) provide meaningful opportunities for engagement, collaboration, and development of the scholarship of teaching and learning. This chapter describes new positions of leadership that serve to implement and sustain FLCs.

ch. 8 Concluding Comments (Jeffrey L. Bernstein, Brooke A. Flinders)
Taking stock of the lessons learned in this volume and considering next steps to facilitate future collaboration in the service of teaching and learning incite yet further conversation.

Index
Cover image

Spanning the Divide Latinos/as in Theological Education

Book
Hernández, Edwin I.; Peña, Milagros; Turner, Caroline Sotelo Viernes; and Salazar, Ariana Monque
2016
AETH, Orlando, FL
BV4030.H47 2016
Topics: Theological Education   |   Changes in Higher Education   |   Diversifying the Faculty   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
This book provides a detailed look at the current state of Latino/a theological education in the United States. This includes consideration of the career development and opinions of Latinos/as in seminary education, as well attention to other important modes of Latino/a theological education, like non-degree programs and Hispanic-serving organizations like the HTI and HSP. Another goal of this project was to make recommendations for ways in which ...
Additional Info:
This book provides a detailed look at the current state of Latino/a theological education in the United States. This includes consideration of the career development and opinions of Latinos/as in seminary education, as well attention to other important modes of Latino/a theological education, like non-degree programs and Hispanic-serving organizations like the HTI and HSP. Another goal of this project was to make recommendations for ways in which schools of theology can do a better job preparing the next generation of Latino/a religious leaders to serve as bridge builders for the future. Thus, we paid special attention to how hospitable theological educational institus are to Hispanics.

This book also offers recommendations on improving Latino/a recruitment, revamping the curriculum and Hispanic ministry education, tending better to the sense of community on campuses, and so much more. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
List of Tables and Figures
Foreword
Preface
Acknowledgments

Part One - Overview
Introduction
ch. 1 Lifting the Veil: A Look Inside Theological Educational Institutions

Part Two - Latino/a Seminary Students
ch. 2 Taking Roll: What Are Latino/a Seminary Students
ch. 3 Hearing the Call: Latinto/a Seminarians Vocational Motivations and Views about the Church’s Role in Society
ch. 4 Finding the Right Fit: How Latino/a Seminarians Choose Their Schools
ch. 5 Bringing Their Gifts: Experience and Education of Latino/a Seminarians
ch. 6 Facing the Gap: How Latino/a Seminarians Evaluate Their Institution’s Quality and Commitment to Diversity
ch. 7 Serving Their Own: What Seminaries Can Do to Help Latinos/as Prepare for Ministry to the Hispanic Community

Part Three - The World of Latino/a Faculty in Theological Education
ch. 8 Latino/a Theological Faculty: A Close Look
ch. 9 Latino/a Theological Faculty: A Cross-Racial Comparison
ch. 10 Faculty Diversity in Theological Education: The Continuous Challenge of Inclusion with Justice

Part Four - Alternative Pathways and Best Practices in Latino/a Theological Education
ch. 11 Making Progress: How One Institution is Successfully Improving Its Approach to Training Latino/a Religious Leaders
ch. 12 Empowering Hispanic Ministry in Greater Grand Rapids: A Case Study
ch. 13 The Alternative Path and Latino/a Concerns: The AETH Study of Bible Institutes
ch. 14 Caring For Their Own: Latino/a Theological Education As Done By HTI/HTIC and HSP

Conclusion - Spanning The Divide
Bibliography
The Authors
Cover image

Transforming the Academy: Faculty Perspectives on Diversity and Pedagogy

Book
Willie-LeBreton, Sarah, ed.
2016
Rutgers University Press, New Brunswick, NJ
LB2331.T727 2016
Topics: Changes in Higher Education   |   Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
In recent decades, American universities have begun to tout the “diversity” of their faculty and student bodies. But what kinds of diversity are being championed in their admissions and hiring practices, and what kinds are being neglected? Is diversity enough to solve the structural inequalities that plague our universities? And how might we articulate the value of diversity in the first place?

...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
In recent decades, American universities have begun to tout the “diversity” of their faculty and student bodies. But what kinds of diversity are being championed in their admissions and hiring practices, and what kinds are being neglected? Is diversity enough to solve the structural inequalities that plague our universities? And how might we articulate the value of diversity in the first place?

Transforming the Academy begins to answer these questions by bringing together a mix of faculty—male and female, cisgender and queer, immigrant and native-born, tenured and contingent, white, black, multiracial, and other—from public and private universities across the United States. Whether describing contentious power dynamics within their classrooms or recounting protests that occurred on their campuses, the book’s contributors offer bracingly honest inside accounts of both the conflicts and the learning experiences that can emerge from being a representative of diversity.

The collection’s authors are united by their commitment to an ideal of the American university as an inclusive and transformative space, one where students from all backgrounds can simultaneously feel intellectually challenged and personally supported. Yet Transforming the Academy also offers a wide range of perspectives on how to best achieve these goals, a diversity of opinion that is sure to inspire lively debate. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgements

Introduction - Full Steps Forward, Half Steps Back - The Diversity Challenge of Pedagogy (Sarah Willie-LeBreton)
Part I: Challenging Classrooms
ch. 1 Decentering Whiteness: Teaching Anti-racism on a Predominantly White Campus (Michael D. Smith and Eve Tuck)
ch. 2 Is there a Silver Lining? The Experiences of a Black female Teaching Assistant (Dela Kusi-Appouh)
ch. 3 Radical Leftist or Objective Practitioner? Perceptions of a Black Male Professor (H. Mark Ellis)
ch. 4 Teaching Difference in Multiple Ways: Through Content and Presence (Cheryl Jones-Walker)
ch. 5 What You May Not See: The Oscillating Critique (Pato Hebert)
ch. 6 The Professor, Her Colleague, and Her Student: Two Race-Related Stories (Sarah Willie-LeBreton)
ch. 7 Challenging Oppression in Moderation? Student Feedback in Diversity Courses (Anita Chikkatur)

Part II: Witnessing Protest
ch. 8 The (S)paces of Academic Work: Disability, Access, and Higher Education (Kristin Lindgren)
ch. 9 Queer Affects/Queer Access (Anna Ward)
ch. 10 Geographies of Difference: From Unity to Solidarity (Betty Sasaki)
ch. 11 La Promesa: Working with Latina/o Students in an Elite Liberal Arts College (Aurora Camacho de Schmidt)
ch. 12 Passing Strange: Embodying and Negotiating Difference in Academia (Daphne Lamothe)
ch. 13 A Dean’s Week: “Trap Doors and Glass Ceilings” (Theresa Tensuan)

Conclusion - Theorizing the Transformation of the 21st Century Campus (Sarah Willie-LeBreton)
Bibliography
About the Contributors
End Notes
Index
Cover image

Envisioning the Faculty for the Twenty-First Century: Moving to a Mission-Oriented and Learner-Centered Model

Book
Kezar, Andrianna; Masey, Daniel; eds.
2016
Rutgers University Press, New Brunswick, NJ
LB2335.7.E68 2016
Topics: Changes in Higher Education

Additional Info:
The institution of tenure—once a cornerstone of American colleges and universities—is rapidly eroding. Today, the majority of faculty positions are part-time or limited-term appointments, a radical change that has resulted more from circumstance than from thoughtful planning. As colleges and universities evolve to meet the changing demands of society, how might their leaders design viable alternative faculty models for the future?

Envisioning the Faculty for the ...
Additional Info:
The institution of tenure—once a cornerstone of American colleges and universities—is rapidly eroding. Today, the majority of faculty positions are part-time or limited-term appointments, a radical change that has resulted more from circumstance than from thoughtful planning. As colleges and universities evolve to meet the changing demands of society, how might their leaders design viable alternative faculty models for the future?

Envisioning the Faculty for the Twenty-First Century weighs the concerns of university administrators, professors, adjuncts, and students in order to critically assess emerging faculty models and offer informed policy recommendations. Cognizant of the financial pressures that have led many universities to favor short-term faculty contracts, higher education experts Adrianna Kezar and Daniel Maxey assemble a top-notch roster of contributors to investigate whether there are ways to modify the existing system or promote new faculty models. They suggest how colleges and universities might rethink their procedures for faculty development, hiring, scheduling, and evaluation in order to maintain a campus environment that still fosters faculty service and student-centered learning.

Even as it asks urgent questions about how to retain the best elements of American higher education, Envisioning the Faculty for the Twenty-First Century also examines the opportunities that systemic changes might create. Ultimately, it provides some starting points for how colleges and universities might best respond to the rapidly evolving needs of an increasingly global society. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Acknowledgments

Part I - The Context for a New Faculty Model
ch. 1 The Current Context for Faculty Work in Higher Education: Understanding the Forces Affecting Higher Education and the Changing Faculty (Daniel Maxey and Adrianna Kezar)
ch. 2 Recognizing the Need for a New Faculty Model (Adrianna Kezar and Daniel Maxey)

Part II - Ideas for a New Faculty
ch. 3 An Emerging Consensus about New Faculty Roles: Results of a National Study of Higher Education Stakeholders (Adrianna Kezar, Elizabeth Holcombe, and Daniel Maxey)
ch. 4 Core Principles for Faculty Models and the Importance of Community (Ann E. Austin and Andrea G. Trice)
ch. 5 The Anatomy and Physiology of Medical School Faculty Career Models (William T. Mallon)
ch. 6 Students Speak About Faculty: What Students Need, What They Want, and What Helps Them Succeed (Arleen Arnsparger and Joanna Drivalas)
ch. 7 Faculty as Learners: The New Faculty Role through the Lens of Faculty Development (Malcolm Brown)
ch. 8 More Than a Zero-Sum Game: Shared Work Agreements (KerryAnn O’Meara and Lauren DeCrosta)
ch. 9 New Paradigm for Faculty Work and Evaluation (Richard Alan Gillman, Nancy Hensel, and David A. Salomon)
ch. 10 Internationalization and Faculty Work (William Plater)
ch. 11 The Future of Faculty Work: Academic Freedom and Democratic Engagement (R. Eugene Rice)
ch. 12 Distinctive Aspirations and Inclinations among Emerging and Early Career Faculty: Seeing the Possibilities (Leslie Gonzalez and Aimee LaPointe Terosky)
ch. 13 Resonant Themes for a Professoriate Reconsidered: Consensus Points to Organize Efforts toward Change (Adrianna Kezar and Daniel Maxey)

About the Contributors
Index
Cover image

Multidisciplinary Collaboration: Research and Relationships

Book
Swanson, Karen Weller, ed.
2014
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA (New Directions for Teaching and Learning, Number 139)
LB1029.T4M858 2014
Topics: Writing the Scholarship of Teaching   |   Librarians as Teachers

Additional Info:
This volume focuses on SoTL, the scholarship of teaching and learning. It discusses how collaborations among and between disciplines can strengthen education and the ways in which students are taught.

The community of scholars at an institution can provide a fertile ground for interdisciplinary collaboration that can enliven the educational process and the research that supports it. The authors here come from many different disciplines where they teach ...
Additional Info:
This volume focuses on SoTL, the scholarship of teaching and learning. It discusses how collaborations among and between disciplines can strengthen education and the ways in which students are taught.

The community of scholars at an institution can provide a fertile ground for interdisciplinary collaboration that can enliven the educational process and the research that supports it. The authors here come from many different disciplines where they teach and use SoTL to inform their own practice and share what they have done with others.

This is the 139th volume of the quarterly Jossey-Bass higher education series New Directions for Teaching and Learning. It offers a comprehensive range of ideas and techniques for improving college teaching based on the experience of seasoned instructors and the latest findings of educational and psychological researchers. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword (Gary Poole)

ch. 1 Research and Relationships (Karen Weller Swanson)
This chapter provides the structure of a Community of Learners using a Scholarship of Teaching and Learning framework.

ch. 2 The University as a Community of Learners (Wallace Daniel)
Building on classical and recent studies of the learning paradigm of higher education, the author distinguishes between receiving ideas and using them and how universities might educate students to be more open to the world, open to discovery and creativity.

ch. 3 A Journey of Discovery: SoTL in Physician Assistant Education (Patricia J. Kelly)
This chapter is a description of the utilization of SoTL concepts and Brookfield’s Critical Incident Questionnaire in an evidence-based medicine course in physician assistant education.

ch. 4 The Scholarship of Teaching and Learning in Clinical Mental Health Counseling (Caroline M. Brackette)
This chapter describes the most commonly used pedagogical practices in the clinical mental health discipline and provides examples from a SoTL project along with reflections on the process of designing, facilitating, and analyzing the research.

ch. 5 SoTL in Teacher Education: Layers of Learning (Jane West)
A teacher educator describes how she shares ongoing SoTL research about her students’ writing with the students themselves, and how this process influences teaching and learning.

ch. 6 The Scholarship of Teaching and Learning in a Physical Therapy Program (Jeannette R. Anderson, Niamh M. Tunney)
Two educators provide an overview of what they have learned about the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning related to the education of future physical therapists and describe how they and their colleagues on faculty are integrating it into their academic lives.

ch. 7 Librarians, Libraries, and the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (Peter Otto)
Information literacy, rather than being mere library jargon, encapsulates the pedagogical core across all disciplines; this chapter discusses the active role librarians can play as collaborators in small-scale or campus-wide initiatives to improve teaching and learning.


Index
Cover image

Hidden Roads: Nonnative English-Speaking International Professors in the Classroom

Book
Hendrix, Katherine Grace; and Hebbani, Aparna, eds.
2014
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA (New Directions for Teaching and Learning, Number 138)
LB1778.2.H533 2014
Topics: Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
This issue uses the powerful narrative of autoethnography to make visible the existence of international professors and teaching assistants who speak English as a Second Language. These important, but often invisible, individuals contribute daily to the education of students within the US postsecondary educational system.

This volume covers a variety of experiences, such as:
- Faculty of color teaching intercultural communication
- International teaching assistants’ attitudes ...
Additional Info:
This issue uses the powerful narrative of autoethnography to make visible the existence of international professors and teaching assistants who speak English as a Second Language. These important, but often invisible, individuals contribute daily to the education of students within the US postsecondary educational system.

This volume covers a variety of experiences, such as:
- Faculty of color teaching intercultural communication
- International teaching assistants’ attitudes toward their US students
- The challenges to existing cultural assumptions in the US classroom.

These experiences - in the form of challenges and contributions - are foregrounded and highlighted in their own right.

This is the 138th volume of the quarterly Jossey-Bass higher education series New Directions for Teaching and Learning. It offers a comprehensive range of ideas and techniques for improving college teaching based on the experience of seasoned instructors and the latest findings of educational and psychological researchers. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Editor’s Notes (Katherine Grace Hendrix, Aparna Hebbani)

ch. 1 “Are You an Immigrant?”: Identity-Based Critical Reflections of Teaching Intercultural Communication (Yea-Wen Chen)
This chapter examines the identity negotiations of a female international faculty of color teaching an intercultural communication course.

ch. 2 College Is Not a Restaurant: Challenging Cultural Hegemony in the US Classroom (Juraj Kittler)
The author offers an experience of a professor who sees his nonnative status as an opportunity to challenge existing cultural assumptions in the US classroom.

ch. 3 Rapport and Knowledge: Enhancing Foreign Instructor Credibility in the Classroom (Mei Zhang)
This chapter emphasizes rapport and knowledge to build instructor credibility in the oral communication class.

ch. 4 Open and Positive Attitudes toward Teaching (Chia-Fang (Sandy) Hsu)
A teacher’s willingness to work out problems with individual students, coupled with openness to students’ ideas and criticism, should help improve students’ negative attitudes toward the teacher. Better learning outcomes and teaching evaluations can also follow.

ch. 5 Opposite Worlds, Singular Mission: Teaching as an ITA (Consolata Nthemba Mutua)
Teaching in a new pedagogical context and cultural milieu offers unique challenges and insight that can enhance our understanding of the American classroom experience.

ch. 6 Capturing the Experiences of International Teaching Assistants in the US American Classroom (Aparna Hebbani, Katherine Grace Hendrix)
The perceptions of PhD- and MA-level international teaching assistants toward their US American undergraduates are investigated. The findings of these ITAs teaching communication courses are discussed and one coauthor provides her reflexive voice as a nonnative English speaker teaching American students.

ch. 7 International Instructor Preparing Teachers for Multicultural Classrooms in the United States: Teaching Intercultural Communication Competence Online (Claudia L. McCalman)
Recent demographic changes in the United States contribute to our increasing number of multicultural classrooms. Some teachers feel they need to be further prepared to effectively teach and understand challenges of multicultural classrooms. This chapter addresses perceptions and reflections of such teachers while receiving intercultural training, part of their ESL (English as a Second Language) certification. The instructor’s reflections close the chapter.

ch. 8 Talking Back: Shifting the Discourse of Deficit to a Pedagogy of Cultural Wealth of International Instructors in US Classrooms (Gust A. Yep)

In addition to highlighting the importance of the voices of international instructors in US classrooms, this chapter proposes a shift from the current discourse of deficit to one of cultural wealth and explores some directions for future research with this population.

Index
Cover image

Faculty and First-Generation College Students: Bridging the Classroom Gap Together

Book
Harvey, Vickie L.; and Housel, Teresa Heinz, eds.
2011
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA (New Directions for Teaching and Learning, Number 127)
LC4069.6.F14 2011
Topics: 18-22 Year Olds   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Gain a greater understanding of the academic, cultural, and social experiences of first-generation college students (FGS). Fascinating, heart-touching, and important, the research and the stories presented here enlighten what FGS often have to overcome to successfully complete their degrees.

With an emphasis on improving FGS' college success, retention, and graduation rates, this volume first covers common obstacles and the trend of FGS continuing on for graduate degrees. Section ...
Additional Info:
Gain a greater understanding of the academic, cultural, and social experiences of first-generation college students (FGS). Fascinating, heart-touching, and important, the research and the stories presented here enlighten what FGS often have to overcome to successfully complete their degrees.

With an emphasis on improving FGS' college success, retention, and graduation rates, this volume first covers common obstacles and the trend of FGS continuing on for graduate degrees. Section Two discusses the complex interplay of social, academic, emotional, and financial influences on academic performance. The chapters collectively affirm that the commitment of university resources is critical to college success.

This is the 127th volume of the Jossey-Bass higher education quarterly report New Directions for Teaching and Learning, which offers a comprehensive range of ideas and techniques for improving college teaching based on the experience of seasoned instructors and the latest findings of educational and psychological researchers. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword (Janice Wiggins) - A first-generation college student and director of Indiana University-Bloomington's Groups Program, Janice Wiggins introduces the volume by advocating for the need to effectively serve first-generation college students. The Groups Program is one of the nation's foremost higher education programs that holistically assists first-generation and low income college students with adjusting to campus culture.

ch. 1 Introduction: Shall We Gather in the Classroom? (Teresa Heinz Housel, Vickie L. Harvey)

The volume's coeditors discuss the increasing number of first generation college students at higher-education institutions today. However, academic personnel do not always understand why FGS struggle academically, socially, and emotionally on campus; thus, this volume extends the existing FGS-related literature and offers ways to help FGS achieve college success.

Section One: The New Pattern: First-Generation College Students As Graduate Students
ch. 2 When First-Generation Students Go to Graduate School (Brett Lunceford)

FGS often navigate through higher education using a system of trial and error. Reflecting on his errors in applying to graduate schools, Lunceford offers practical step-by-step advice for other FGS who wish to pursue graduate study.

ch. 3 First-Generation Latina Graduate Students: Balancing Professional Identity Development with Traditional Family Roles (Valerie Lester Leyva)

Like many FGS, Leyva was unprepared for the stratified social structure and expectations of campus culture; this lack of preparation is often compounded for ethnic minorities. Leyva uses ethnographic interviews to examine how Latina women in her university's department manage gender and familial roles with college demands.

ch. 4 Learning a New World: Reflections on Being a First-Generation College Student and the Influence of TRIO Programs (LaKresha Graham)

Graham emphasizes the TRIO programs' important role in supporting FGS as they navigate unfamiliar academic culture. The chapter asserts that Upward Bound, Student Educational Support Services, and the McNair Scholars Program are increasingly important as more FGS pursue graduate studies.

Section Two: First-Generation Studies Join The Undergraduate Ranks
ch. 5 Faculty Perceptions of the First-Generation Student Experience and Programs at Tribal Colleges (Jacqueline J. Schmidt, Yemi Akande)

The authors examine barriers to success that Native-American FGS face at tribal colleges, and offer specific recommendations for improved student services based on the authors’ interviews with faculty at five tribal colleges.

ch. 6 Understanding the First-Generation Student Experience in Higher Education Through a Relational Dialectic Perspective (Russell Lowery-Hart, George Pacheco Jr.)

Russell Lowery-Hart and George Pacheco Jr. use interviews and focus groups with FGS to examine the tensions they often experience due to lack of family support, financial worries, poor academic preparation, and other barriers. Because support programs often isolate and further marginalize FGS, Lowery-Hart and Pacheco argue that college personnel must realize that the failure to "fit in" can lead to students’ incapacity for positive relationships with the college and peers.

ch. 7 First-Generation Issues: Learning Outcomes of the Dismissal Testimonial for Academically Dismissed Students in the Arts & Sciences (Jennifer Brost, Kelly Payne)

Studies indicate that FGS drop out of college at higher rates than non-FGS. To extend the existing research, Brost and Payne conducted surveys with FGS who are on academic dismissal to examine what specific issues led the students to fail academically.

ch. 8 A Social Constructionist View of Issues Confronting First-Generation College Students (Stephen Coffman)

Coffman uses interviews with FGS to argue that race and class are two areas in which students experience tension when transitioning into campus culture. When college personnel understand the social influences on FGS' college experiences, they can better assist the students through appropriate support programs.

ch. 9 Critical Compassionate Pedagogy and the Teacher's Role in First-Generation Student Success (Richie Neil Hao)

Hao asserts that critical compassionate pedagogy allows him to better meet the pedagogical needs of FGS. He advocates for this pedagogical perspective, arguing that many instructors do not consider the different pedagogical needs of underserved student populations such as FGS.

ch. 10 Gathering Ourselves and Our Students: Concluding Remarks (Vickie L. Harvey, Teresa Heinz Housel)

In this concluding chapter, Harvey and Heinz Housel reflect on the book’s contribution to the research on FGS, discuss common questions that FGS have about attending college, and assert the need for effective campus support programs.
Index
Cover image

Experiential Education: Making the Most of Learning Outside the Classroom

Book
Qualters, Donna M., ed.
2010
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA (New Directions for Teaching and Learning, Number 124)
BF318.5.E973 2010
Topics: Alternative Classrooms   |   Civic Engagement

Additional Info:
Additional Info:


Table Of Content:
Editor’s Notes (Donna M. Qualters)

ch. 1 Forms and Issues in Experiential Learning (David Thornton Moore)

This chapter identifies the major forms of experiential education in terms of their institutional settings, core educational practices, and constituencies, while addressing where experience fits in the academy's educational mission.

ch. 2 Community-Based Learning and Research (Elise Dallimore, David A. Rochefort, Kristen Simonelli)

Community-based learning and research enhances individual learning experiences, and the culture and curriculum of an institution. With a focus on administrative structure and classroom-based models, the authors address what is necessary to implement service-learning and community-based research.

ch. 3 Learning Abroad (Lori Gardinier, Dawn Colquitt-Anderson)

This chapter discusses the internationalization of higher education and the models for education abroad. The authors address the specific challenges these programs face and provide strategies for overcoming them.

ch. 4 Demystifying Experiential Learning in the Performing Arts (Nancy Kindelan)

This chapter discusses the intersection of performing arts, liberal arts, and experiential education through an exploration of operational and value-focused skills and active and intentional learning, as well as the application of these in a performing arts student’s capstone project.

ch. 5 Work-Based Learning: Valuing Practice as an Educational Event (Joseph A. Raelin)

This chapter explains work-based learning and offers practical guidelines to teach and assess learning of this nature. The author emphasizes the importance of and strategies for effective reflective practice.

ch. 6 Empowering Reflective Ethical Engagement in Field Settings (Perrin Cohen)

This chapter explores some of the ethical challenges faced by students in experiential education and provides strategies for teachers, supervisors, and administrators to assist students in gaining the skills and practices necessary to deal with such challenges.

ch. 7 Bringing the Outside In: Assessing Experiential Education (Donna M. Qualters)

This chapter challenges a negative view of assessment and explains the value of assessment to an experiential learning program. The author provides practical methods and models for involving faculty and measuring student learning.

ch. 8 Growing and Funding Experiential Learning Programs: A Recipe for Success (Monica R. Cowart)

This chapter outlines how a college or university with limited financial resources can best utilize internal and external resources to launch a new experiential learning program or enhance an existing one.

ch. 9 Campus Stories: Three Case Studies - In this chapter, three different sets of authors reflect on their experiences in creating or developing experiential learning programs.

Part A: Institutionalizing Pedagogical Change: A Case Study in Building a Learning Organization (Victoria A. Farrar-Myers, Dana Dunn)

This case study examines the lessons learned from the University of Texas at Arlington experience in developing and designing a strategic plan including active learning and experiential education.

Part B: The Odyssey Program at Hendrix College (Nancy P. Fleming, Mark S. Schantz)

The authors share the factors that contributed to the success of an experiential learning program at a small liberal arts college, and examine the consequences for students, faculty, staff, and the institution as a whole.

Part C: Putting Experiential Education into Practice: Using Kolb as a Learning Model for Implementing Organizational Change (James R. Johnson, Ronald J. Kovach, Patricia N. Roberson)

David A. Kolb's Experiential Learning Model provides the organizational change methodology for the implementation of innovative graduation requirements in experiential education at Purdue University Calumet.

ch. 10 Experiencing Success: Some Strategies for Planning the Program (Timothy Donovan, Richard Porter, James Stellar)

Drawing from their own experiential learning, the authors provide strategies for preparing an experiential education program and coping with the numerous challenges faced in developing this type of programming.

ch. 11 Making the Most of Learning Outside the Classroom (Donna M. Qualters)

This chapter describes the importance of developing the skill of deep reflection and calls for the establishment of a reflective curriculum strand to promote learning in the field.

Additional Resources
Index
Cover image

Doing the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning, Measuring Systematic Changes to Teaching and Improvements in Learning

Book
Gurung, Regan A.R.; and Wilson, Janie H., eds.
2013
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA (New Directions for Teaching and Learning, Number 136)
LB2822.75.D65 2013
Topics: Writing the Scholarship of Teaching

Additional Info:
The Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL) should be an integral part of every academic’s life, representing not only the pinnacle of effortful teaching, but also standing side by side with more conventional disciplinary scholarship. Although practiced by many instructors for years, SoTL has garnered national attention resulting in a spate of new journals to publish pedagogical research.

SoTL helps students, fosters faculty development, and has been ...
Additional Info:
The Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL) should be an integral part of every academic’s life, representing not only the pinnacle of effortful teaching, but also standing side by side with more conventional disciplinary scholarship. Although practiced by many instructors for years, SoTL has garnered national attention resulting in a spate of new journals to publish pedagogical research.

SoTL helps students, fosters faculty development, and has been integrated into higher education. This volume provides readers with challenges that will motivate them to engage in SoTL and take their pedagogical research further. We include many key features aimed to help both the teacher new to research and SoTL and also researchers who may have a long list of scholarly publications in non-pedagogical areas and who have not conducted research.

This is the 136th volume of this Jossey-Bass higher education series. It offers a comprehensive range of ideas and techniques for improving college teaching based on the experience of seasoned instructors and the latest findings of educational and psychological researchers. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Advancing Scholarly Research on Teaching and Learning (Regan A. R. Gurung, Janie H. Wilson)

This chapter provides a brief history of the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL), delineates the main audience for this volume, and presents a framework of the volume with a preview of each chapter.

ch. 2 Using Assessment and SoTL to Enhance Student Learning (K. Laurie Dickson, Melinda M. Treml)

Coordinating SoTL and assessment efforts strengthens the processes of inquiry, evidence, and innovation that lead to the continual improvement of student learning. Examples are provided for how to work collaboratively with colleagues to use these processes to continually inform the teaching practices within classrooms, academic programs, and institutions.

ch. 3 Designing SoTL Studies - Part I: Validity (Robert A. Bartsch)

This chapter discusses how to improve validity in SoTL studies through generating appropriate measures and using designs that examine causality between an activity and students’ performance.

ch. 4 Designing SoTL Studies - Part II: Practicality (Robert A. Bartsch)

This chapter suggests solutions to common practical problems in designing SoTL studies. In addition, the advantages and disadvantages of different types of designs are discussed.

ch. 5 Statistical Models for Analyzing Learning Data (Georjeanna Wilson-Doenges)

This chapter will provide potential models for analyzing learning data through a discussion of screening data and then analyzing that data using appropriate statistical techniques.

ch. 6 Navigating the IRB: The Ethics of SoTL (Ryan C. Martin)

This chapter discusses Institutional Review Boards (IRBs) as they apply to the SoTL. Specifically, it describes when SoTL projects must receive IRB approval, why they must get IRB approval, the review process, and some special issues of concern with regard to SoTL.

ch. 7 Tell a Good Story Well: Writing Tips (Randolph A. Smith)

This chapter gives reasons why writing is important, summarizes general writing guidelines common tomany academic disciplines, and provides specific writing guidelines that authors should use to make their manuscripts stronger and more likely to be acceptable to editors.

ch. 8 Navigating the Minefields of Publishing (Andrew N. Christopher)

From the perspective of a journal editor and experienced author, this chapter provides counsel on the "ins" and "outs" of publishing empirical research in peer-reviewed journals.

ch. 9 Faculty Development Centers and the Role of SoTL (Beth M. Schwartz, Aeron Haynie)

This chapter discussesways that faculty development and teaching centers can foster the practice of SoTL and create a campus culture where SoTL is recognized as important scholarly work.

Index
Cover image

Contemplative Studies in Higher Education

Book
Sanders, Linda A., ed.
2013
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA (New Directions for Teaching and Learning, Number 134)
LB2361.C59 2013
Topics: Cognitive Development   |   Changes in Higher Education   |   Alternative Classrooms

Additional Info:
The complexities of 21st-century life- personal, social, cultural, and environmental - demand thoughtful responses, responses fostered and enhanced through contemplative experience. Contemplative education includes studies of the history, psychology, and socialcultural context of such experience, as well as the development of experiential knowledge through one or more personal practices.

Contemplative education has recently emerged in the academy. Although there has been significant published discussion of postsecondary courses and ...
Additional Info:
The complexities of 21st-century life- personal, social, cultural, and environmental - demand thoughtful responses, responses fostered and enhanced through contemplative experience. Contemplative education includes studies of the history, psychology, and socialcultural context of such experience, as well as the development of experiential knowledge through one or more personal practices.

Contemplative education has recently emerged in the academy. Although there has been significant published discussion of postsecondary courses and programs that incorporate contemplative views and practices, there have been few studies of relevant curricula and pedagogy. This volume integrates research, theory, and practice through a fusion of perspectives and approaches, giving readers the opportunity to review contemplative educational concepts and applications in academic, social, and institutional domains.

This is the 134th volume of this Jossey-Bass higher education series. New Directions for Teaching and Learning offers a comprehensive range of ideas and techniques for improving college teaching based on the experience of seasoned instructors and the latest findings of educational and psychological researchers. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface (Linda A. Sanders)

ch. 1 Peak Oil, Peak Water, Peak Education (Thomas B. Coburn)
This chapter introduces contemplative education as a way of teaching and learning that is meaningful, relevant, and critical to the evolution of the 21st century academy. The essay also offers guidelines for contemplative practice in face-to-face and online class environments.

ch. 2 Contemplative Science: An Insider Prospectus (Willoughby B. Britton, Anne-Catharine Brown, Christopher T. Kaplan, Roberta E. Goldman, Marie DeLuca, Rahil Rojiani, Harry Reis, Mandy Xi, Jonathan C. Chou, Faye McKenna, Peter Hitchcock, Tomas A. Rocha, Josh Himmelfarb, David M. Margolis, Halsey F. Niles, Allison M. Eckert, Tana Frank)
Seventeen members of the Contemplative Studies Research Lab from Brown University envision a new kind of science that includes collaborative research and the integration of contemplative studies into scientific training. The chapter includes comprehensive discussion about the long-term consequences of contemplative pedagogies for the fields of science and medicine.

ch. 3 Contemplative Practices and the Renewal of Legal Education (Rhonda V. Magee)
This chapter discusses the contemplative law movement and its influence on the development of new courses and cocurricular sessions at the University of San Francisco School of Law and other law school programs. The contemplative approach to law is also presented as transformative and inclusive epistemology and methodology in response to multiple critiques that call for change in legal education.

ch. 4 Birthing Internal Images: Employing the Cajita Project as a Contemplative Activity in a College Classroom (Vijay Kanagala, Laura I. Rendón)
This chapter provides a step-by-step description of planning and implementing the cajita project, a contemplative exercise, designed to facilitate self-refl exivity, as well as personal and social responsibility in graduate students majoring in higher education leadership and student affairs at the University of Texas–San Antonio. The chapter also explains the cultural and pedagogical origins of the cajita project.

ch. 5 Integrating Contemplative Education and Contemporary Performance (Linda A. Sanders)
In this chapter, faculty and students characterize contemplative education, and students disclose their perspectives of how contemplative view and practice affect their personal and professional development in a graduate, interdisciplinary performing arts community. At Naropa University, traditional contemplative education is integrated with conservatory-level, contemporary performance training in its Master of Fine Arts in Theater: Contemporary Performance program.

ch. 6 The Formation and Development of the Mindful Campus (Margaret A. DuFon, Jennifer Christian)
This chapter recounts the efforts of faculty and students to cultivate contemplative pedagogies and mindfulness through curricular initiatives and extracurricular programs at California State University– Chico. The authors describe their campuswide programmatic and promotional work that captures the attention, support, and involvement of the greater Chico community.

ch. 7 Koru: Teaching Mindfulness to Emerging Adults(Holly B. Rogers)
This chapter reviews the developmental features of emerging adulthood and explores the ways in which mindfulness is a useful developmental aid for this age group. The specifi c strategies employed in Koru, a program designed at Duke University to make mindfulness accessible to college students, are described. Student responses to Koru are also briefly discussed.

ch. 8 Contemplative Pedagogy: A Quiet Revolution in Higher Education (Arthur Zajonc)
A contemplative pedagogy movement is quietly emerging around the world. This chapter offers a brief history of the movement, which has occurred during the last fi fteen years throughout postsecondary campuses, and describes the contemplative practices of mindfulness, concentration, open awareness, and sustaining contradictions. The author also voices such larger hopes for higher education as the cessation of ignorance and an “epistemology of love” and suggests that contemplative pedagogy can cultivate and form the capacities that are required for integrative, transformative teaching and learning in the 21st century academy.

Index
Cover image

Unforgettable: Enabling Deep and Durable Learning

Book
Gray, W. Michael
2016
Wipf & Stock Publishers, Eugene, OR
LB2331.G669 2016
Topics: 18-22 Year Olds   |   Cognitive Development   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
We have an uneasy relationship with the relentless deluge of information gushing out of academia and our media outlets. To turn it off is escapist, but to attempt to cognitively grapple with it is overwhelming.

In Unforgettable: Enabling Deep and Durable Learning, a nationally recognized master teacher gives professors and their students the means to chart a clear path through this information explosion. Humans crave explanatory patterns, and ...
Additional Info:
We have an uneasy relationship with the relentless deluge of information gushing out of academia and our media outlets. To turn it off is escapist, but to attempt to cognitively grapple with it is overwhelming.

In Unforgettable: Enabling Deep and Durable Learning, a nationally recognized master teacher gives professors and their students the means to chart a clear path through this information explosion. Humans crave explanatory patterns, and this book enables teachers to think deeply about their academic disciplines to find and articulate their core explanatory principles and to engage their students in a compelling way of thinking. An alternative title for this book could be Why the Best College Teachers Do What They Do because the author articulates a compelling rationale that will equip faculty to create and deliver transformative courses. Students in transformative courses grapple with essential questions and gain mental muscle that equips them for real world challenges. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Acknowledgements
Introduction

ch. 1 Teaching for Transformation
ch. 2 Becoming a Clear-Thinking Teacher
ch. 3 Thinking Like an Expert
ch. 4 Developing and Clarifying Your Ideas
ch. 5 Explanatory Power
ch. 6 This Is The Way: Designing the Optimal Learning Path
ch. 7 Student Flourishing
ch. 8 Ask, Don’t Tell
ch. 9 Speaking Truth in Love: Assessment as Communication
ch. 10 Averting Disaster

Appendix 1 - Logic of a Chief
Appendix 2 - Richard Paul’s eight elements of thought compared with my approach
Appendix 3 - Gowin’s Knowledge Vee
Appendix 4 - Socratic GPS
Appendix 5 - Assessment is Course Design
Bibliography