Mentoring Faculty

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Embracing Contraries: Explorations in Learning and Teaching

Book
Elbow, Peter
1986
Oxford University Press, New York, NY
LB2331.E48 1986
Topics: Mentoring Faculty   |   Philosophy of Teaching   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory

Additional Info:
Peter Elbow's widely acclaimed and original theories on the writing process, set forth in Writing Without Teachers and Writing With Power, have earned him a reputation as a leading educational innovator. Now Elbow has drawn together twelve of his essays on the nature of learning and teaching to suggest a comprehensive philosophy of education. At once theoretical and down-to-earth, this collection will appeal not only to teachers, adminitrators and students, ...
Additional Info:
Peter Elbow's widely acclaimed and original theories on the writing process, set forth in Writing Without Teachers and Writing With Power, have earned him a reputation as a leading educational innovator. Now Elbow has drawn together twelve of his essays on the nature of learning and teaching to suggest a comprehensive philosophy of education. At once theoretical and down-to-earth, this collection will appeal not only to teachers, adminitrators and students, but to anyone with a love of learning.

Elbow explores the "contraries" in the educational process, in particular his theory that clear thinking can be enhanced by inviting indecision, incoherence, and paradoxical thinking. The essays, written over a period of twenty-five years, are engaged in a single enterprise: to arrive at insights or conclusions about learning and teaching while still doing justice to the "rich messiness" of intellectual inquiry. Drawing his conclusions from his own perplexities as a student and as a teacher, Elbow discusses the value of interdisciplinary teaching, his theory of "cooking" (an interaction of conflicting ideas), the authority relationship in teaching and the value of specifying learning objectives. A full section is devoted to evaluation and feedback, both of students and faculty. Finally, Elbow focuses on the need to move beyond the skepticism of critical thinking to what he calls "methodological belief" -- an ability to embrace more than one point of view. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction

Part 1 The Learning Process
ch. 1 Nondisciplinary Courses and the Two Roots of Real Learning
ch. 2 Cooking: The Interaction of Conflicting Elements
ch. 3 Teaching Two Kinds of Thinking by Teaching Writing

Part 2 The Teaching Process
ch. 4 Exploring My Teaching
ch. 5 The Pedagogy of the Bamboozled
ch. 6 Trying to Teach While Thinking About the End
ch. 7 Embracing Contraries in the Teaching Process

Part 3 The Evaluation Process
ch. 8 Evaluating Students More Accurately
ch. 9 Collaborative Peer Evaluation by Faculty
ch. 9a Visiting Pete Sinclair
ch. 9b On Being Visited
ch. 9c Contraries in Responding
ch. 10 Trustworthiness in Evaluation

Part 4 Contraries and Inquiry
ch. 11 The Value of Dialectic
ch. 12 Methodological Doubting and Believing: Contraries in Inquiring

Bibliography
Index
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Motivation from Within: Approaches for Encouraging Faculty and Students to Excel

Book
Theall, Michael, ed.
1999
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LB1025.2.M68 1999
Topics: Mentoring Students   |   Mentoring Faculty   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Motivation is not something one "does to" someone else--good motivational practice requires that we engage others in a common quest. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Motivation is not something one "does to" someone else--good motivational practice requires that we engage others in a common quest. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Motivation and Diversity
Motivation and Diversity: A Framework for Teaching.
Student Motivation and Epistemological Beliefs (Michael B. Paulsen & Kenneth A. Feldman).
Motivation for Higher-Order Learning (Janet G. Donald).

Motivation and Methods
Using the ARCS Motivational Process in Computer-Based Instruction and Distance Education (John M. Keller).
CORE Elements of Student Motivation in Problem-Based Learning (Marjorie M. MacKinnon).
The Motivational Benefits of Cooperative Learning (Theodore Panitz)

Motivation and The Institution
Faculty Motivation: The Role of Supportive Teaching Culture (Kenneth A. Feldman & Michael B. Paulsen).
Motivation in Interdisciplinary Programs (Edward B. Nuhfer).
Institutional Improvement and Motivated Faculty: A Case Study (Donald W. Farmer).

Conclusion
What Have We Learned? A Synthesis and Some Guidelines for Effective Motivation in Higher Education (Michael Theall & Jennifer Franklin)
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Mentoring Revisited: Making an Impact on Individuals and Institutions

Book
Wunsch, Marie A., ed.
1994
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA (New Directions for Teaching and Learning, Number 57)
LB1731.4.M46 1994
Topics: Mentoring Faculty   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
If we believe that the welfare of individuals and the organization are one and the same, the points of compatibility and mutual support must be found and nurtured. If we value the "developmental culture" of an academic institution, the concerns of individuals for growth, change, advancement, recognition, and support can be brought into harmony with the goals of the "organizational culture" for stability, continuity, and community. The twenty-first century will ...
Additional Info:
If we believe that the welfare of individuals and the organization are one and the same, the points of compatibility and mutual support must be found and nurtured. If we value the "developmental culture" of an academic institution, the concerns of individuals for growth, change, advancement, recognition, and support can be brought into harmony with the goals of the "organizational culture" for stability, continuity, and community. The twenty-first century will bring new challenges to higher education. Academic institutions must renew their responsibility to support the developmental needs of all their members. This commitment to support human growth is also part of institutional regeneration. An integrated, comprehensive model of personal and organizational development that includes mentoring for students, faculty, staff, and administrators can make a significant contribution to the best use of human resources, community building, and institutional vitality. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Editor's Notes

ch. 1 New Directions for Mentoring: An Organizational Development Perspective (Marie A. Wunsch )
ch. 2 Mentoring: An Adult Developmental Perspective (Mary L. Otto)
ch. 3 Developing Mentoring Programs: Major Themes and Issues (Marie A. Wunsch)
ch. 4 Mentoring Undergraduate Minority Students: An Overview, Survey, and Model Program (Melvin C. Terrell, and R. Kipp Hassel)
ch. 5 Developing a Freshman Mentoring Program: A Small College Experience (Keith B. Wilson)
ch. 6 Enabling the Success of Junior Faculty Women Through Mentoring (Linda K. Johnsrud)
ch. 7 Mentoring New Faculty for Teaching and Research (William K. Jackson, Ronald D. Simpson)
ch. 8 Forging the Ties That Bind: Peer Mentoring Part-Time Faculty (Barbara J. Mills)
ch. 9 Mentoring Faculty at the Departmental Level (Kay U. Herr)
ch. 10 Mentoring Faculty for Midcareer Issues (Daniel W. Wheeler, B.J. Wheeler)
ch. 11 Peer Mentoring Among Graduate Students of Color: Expanding the Mentoring Relationship James Bonilla, Carleton Pickron, Travis Tatum)
ch. 12 Taking a Cultural Journey Through Mentorship: A Personal Story (Virgie O. Chattergy)
ch. 13 Mentoring Minority Graduate Students: A West Indian Narrative (Christine A. Stanley)

Appendix: A Checklist for Developing, Implementing, and Assessing Mentoring Programs
Index
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"Lessons Learned About Mentoring"

Article
Boice, Robert
1992
in Developing New and Junior Faculty (San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 1992), 51-61
Topics: Mentoring Faculty

Additional Info:
A review of studies of mentoring for new college faculty suggests practical guidelines for maximizing the mentoring experience. Recommendations include "cataloging" (of past, current, and planned activities); group mentoring; and application of a theory stressing involvement, regimen, solving the right problem, and social networking. (DB)
Additional Info:
A review of studies of mentoring for new college faculty suggests practical guidelines for maximizing the mentoring experience. Recommendations include "cataloging" (of past, current, and planned activities); group mentoring; and application of a theory stressing involvement, regimen, solving the right problem, and social networking. (DB)
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"Why Professors Don't Change"

Article
Ekroth, Loren
1990
Teaching Excellence 1, no. 5 (1990)
Topics: Mentoring Faculty   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
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"Socializing Future Faculty to the Values of Undergraduate Education"

Article
Gaff, Jerry G., and Leo M. Lambert
1996
Article: Change July/Aug (1996): 38-45
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Mentoring Faculty   |   Leadership and Faculty Development   |   Doctoral Students and New Teachers

Additional Info:
Focuses on socializing future faculty to the values of undergraduate education. Values of hiring colleges and universities; Approaches to graduate preparation; Preparation of future faculty project; Initiatives and strategic benefits. INSET: More about support programs..
Additional Info:
Focuses on socializing future faculty to the values of undergraduate education. Values of hiring colleges and universities; Approaches to graduate preparation; Preparation of future faculty project; Initiatives and strategic benefits. INSET: More about support programs..
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The Department Chair's Role in Developing New Faculty into Teachers and Scholars

Book
Bensimon, Estela Mara, Kelly Ward, and Karla Sanders
2000
Anker Publishing, Bolton, MA
LB2341.B4742 2000
Topics: Mentoring Faculty   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Hiring new tenure-track faculty and seeing them through to tenure is an onerous responsibility for department chairs, with significant departmental and institutional consequences.

The Department Chair's Role in Developing New Faculty into Teachers and Scholars is designed to help chairs with the three critical stages of junior faculty socialization: 1) recruitment and hiring; 2) the first year; and 3) evaluating new faculty performance. The authors offer concrete advice and activities; make ...
Additional Info:
Hiring new tenure-track faculty and seeing them through to tenure is an onerous responsibility for department chairs, with significant departmental and institutional consequences.

The Department Chair's Role in Developing New Faculty into Teachers and Scholars is designed to help chairs with the three critical stages of junior faculty socialization: 1) recruitment and hiring; 2) the first year; and 3) evaluating new faculty performance. The authors offer concrete advice and activities; make extensive use of real-life situations; and provide generic examples of letters, checklists, and orientations that can be adapted to individual contexts.

This book provides the tools chairs need to adapt habit and intuition into effective management practices. The advice will help department chairs achieve the mission and objective of their own units, as well as their colleges and campuses. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Organizing the search for a new faculty member
ch. 2 Negotiating the job offer
ch. 3 Providing information before and upon arrival
ch. 4 Addressing professional/institutional questions
ch. 5 Planning an effective departmental orientation
ch. 6 Orienting new faculty to teaching
ch. 7 Addressing service concerns
ch. 8 Developing full-year orientation programs
ch. 9 Creating mentoring relationships
ch. 10 Demystifying the promotion and tenure process
ch. 11 Developing productive researchers and effective teachers
ch. 12 Monitoring service obligations
ch. 13 Explaining evaluation procedures
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The Mentor's Guide: Facilitating Effective Learning Relationships

Book
Zachary, Lois J., and Laurent A. Daloz
2000
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LB1731.4.Z23 2000
Topics: Mentoring Faculty   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
This rich and insightful book explores the critical process of mentoring and presents practical tools for facitlitating the experience from beginning to end. It is based on Laurent A. Daloz's popular and widely used conept that mentoring is a learning journey, in which the mentor and mentee serve as companions along the way. Now leaders, managers,teachers, and leaders form any career, professional, or educational setting can successfully navigate the ...
Additional Info:
This rich and insightful book explores the critical process of mentoring and presents practical tools for facitlitating the experience from beginning to end. It is based on Laurent A. Daloz's popular and widely used conept that mentoring is a learning journey, in which the mentor and mentee serve as companions along the way. Now leaders, managers,teachers, and leaders form any career, professional, or educational setting can successfully navigate the learning journey by using the hand-on worksheets and exericses in this unique resource. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Preface
Acknowledgments
The Author

ch. 1 Grounding the Work: Focusing on Learning
ch. 2 Working the Ground: Considering Context
ch. 3 To Everything There Is a Season: Predictable Phases
ch. 4 Tilling the Soil: Preparing
ch. 5 Planting Seeds: Negotiating
ch. 6 Nurturing Growth: Enabling
ch. 7 Reaping the Harvest: Coming to Closure
ch. 8 Regenerating Personal Growth Through Mentoring

App. A Creating a Mentoring Culture
App. B Digging Deeper: Resources for Further Learning

References
Index
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Ms. Mentor's Impeccable Advice for Women in Academia

Book
Toth, Emily
1997
University of Pennsylvania Press, Philadelphia, PA
LB2332.3.T68 1997
Topics: Faculty Well-Being   |   Diversifying the Faculty   |   Mentoring Faculty

Additional Info:
In question-and-answer form, Ms. Mentor advises academic women about issues they daren't discuss openly, such as: How does one really clamber onto the tenure track when the job market is so nasty, brutish, and small? Is there such a thing as the perfectly marketable dissertation topic? How does a meek young woman become a tiger of an authority figure in the classroom and get stupendous teaching evaluations? How does one ...
Additional Info:
In question-and-answer form, Ms. Mentor advises academic women about issues they daren't discuss openly, such as: How does one really clamber onto the tenure track when the job market is so nasty, brutish, and small? Is there such a thing as the perfectly marketable dissertation topic? How does a meek young woman become a tiger of an authority figure in the classroom and get stupendous teaching evaluations? How does one cope with sexual harassment, grandiosity, and bizarre behavior from entrenched colleagues? Ms. Mentor's readers will find answers to the secret queries they were afraid to ask anyone else. They'll discover what it really takes to get tenure; what to wear to academic occasions; when to snicker, when to hide, what to eat, and when to sue. They'll find out how to get firmly planted in the rich red earth of tenure. Ms. Mentor's wisdom grows out of many a real-life experience: she guarantees that some readers will squirm. She lavishly dispenses witty advice, and valuable information, while despising psychobabble, postcomprehensible jargon, and pontification by anyone other than herself. She also insists that sisterhood is, and must be, powerful. Readers of Ms. Mentor's Impeccable Advice for Women in Academia are in for an unusual treat. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Acknowledgments

ch. 1 Graduate School: The Rite of Passage
ch. 2 The Job Hunt
ch. 3 The Conference Scence
ch. 4 First Year on the Job
ch. 5 The Perils and Pleasures of Teaching
ch. 6 When Cultures Collide
ch. 7 Muddles and Puzzles
ch. 8 Slouching Toward Tenure
ch. 9 Post-Tenure
ch. 10 Emerita: The Golden Years
ch. 11 Final Words

Bibliography: Women in Academia and Other Readings Sampled by Ms. Mentor
Index
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Mentor in a Manual: Climbing the Academic Ladder to Tenure

Book
Schoenfeld, Clay and Robert Magnan
1994
Atwood Publishing, Madison, WI
LB2335.7.S36 1994
Topics: Mentoring Faculty   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
For assistant professors envisioning tenure, this completely revised publication is about as close to being a mentor as a book can be! Using a representative institution and a prototype assistant professor, Mentor in a Manual provides invaluable counsel for those on the tenure track. Twelve chapters take the new hire through each step with advice on making it through the mazes. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
For assistant professors envisioning tenure, this completely revised publication is about as close to being a mentor as a book can be! Using a representative institution and a prototype assistant professor, Mentor in a Manual provides invaluable counsel for those on the tenure track. Twelve chapters take the new hire through each step with advice on making it through the mazes. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword by Allan W. Ostar
Publisher's Notes
Preface to the Anniversary Edition
Preface to the Second Edition

ch. 1: Acquiring a Professional Frame of Mind
ch. 2: Getting to Know Your Territory
ch. 3: Grasping Generic Institutional Expectations
ch. 4: Appreciating the Practical Politics of Getting Promoted
ch. 5: The Teaching Challenge: Preparing to Teach
ch. 6: The Teaching Challenge: In the Classroom
ch. 7: The Teaching Challenge: Outside the Classroom
ch. 8: The Research Paradigm
ch. 9: The Service Syndrome
ch. 10: A Bottom Line: Getting Published
ch. 11: Bell, Candle, and Book
ch. 12: Presenting Your Credentials for the Ultimate Decision

Appendix A: What Do I Do if I Don’t Make Tenure?
Appendix B: Suggested Readings
Index
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"Mentoring of Hispanic Persons in Theological Education: Reflections on Distinctives"

Article
Pazmiño, Robert W.
2001
Paper presented at Through Hispanic Eyes - A Conference for Non-Hispanic Faculty, 2001
Topics: Theological Education   |   Diversifying the Faculty   |   Mentoring Faculty

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
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"Teaching Circles: Making Inquiry Safe for Faculty"

Article
Black, Laurel, and Mary Ann Cessna
2002
Teaching Excellence 14, no. 3 (2002): 10-11
Topics: Mentoring Faculty   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
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Mentoring for Mission: Nurturing New Faculty at Church-related Colleges

Book
Simon, Caroline J.
2003
Eerdmans, Grand Rapids, MI
LB1731.4.M46554 2003
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Mentoring Faculty   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Simon presents Roman Catholic and Protestant perspectives on ways to nurture new faculty at church-related educational institutions, for those involved in administering faculty development programs and for those seeking advice on designing and implementing such programs. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Simon presents Roman Catholic and Protestant perspectives on ways to nurture new faculty at church-related educational institutions, for those involved in administering faculty development programs and for those seeking advice on designing and implementing such programs. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction: Mentoring as an Exercise of Practical Wisdom

ch. 1 Mentoring and Christian Mission
ch. 2 All Mentoring Is Local: Thinking about How Your Program Fits Your Institution
ch. 3 All Mentoring Is Personal: Making Sure Your Program Fits Your Faculty
ch. 4 Getting There from Here
ch. 5 Facing Challenges and Achieving Lasting Success
ch. 6 The Bottom Line: Outcomes of Mentoring

App. 1 Reflection Questions for Mentoring Directors
App. 2 Reflection and Discussion Questions for Mentor Training
App. 3 Questions for Mentors and New Faculty to Reflect on Together

Selected Topical Bibliography
Contributors
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"Mentoring Younger Faculty"

TTR
Valantasis, Richard
2005
Article: Teaching Theology and Religion 8, no. 1 (2005): 56-59
BL41.T4
Topics: Mentoring Faculty

Additional Info:
Mentoring new faculty into vocations of teaching falls squarely on the shoulders of those entrusted with setting the course for the next generation of faculty. Often the role of new teacher development is assigned to senior faculty. In this essay the author provides an autobiographical account of experiences both as a mentor and as one who had been mentored. Carefully weaving threads of experience with pedagogical insight, the author crafts ...
Additional Info:
Mentoring new faculty into vocations of teaching falls squarely on the shoulders of those entrusted with setting the course for the next generation of faculty. Often the role of new teacher development is assigned to senior faculty. In this essay the author provides an autobiographical account of experiences both as a mentor and as one who had been mentored. Carefully weaving threads of experience with pedagogical insight, the author crafts a tapestry that accentuates how mentors can play important roles in the maturation of newer faculty by attention to research and publication, teaching, and service. A list of recommendations pertaining to the beneficial aspects of mentoring for faculty and schools is provided.
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Becoming a High Performance Mentor: A Guide to Reflection and Action

Book
Rowley, James B.
2006
Corwin Press, Thousand Oaks, CA
LB1731.4.R687 2006
Topics: Mentoring Faculty   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
High-performance mentors are not born. Even experienced educators need training in order to provide constructive support to entry-year teachers. James B. Rowley's mentoring framework has been used to successfully train thousands of teachers to acquire the six essential behaviors of high-performance mentoring: committing, accepting, communicating, coaching, learning, and inspiring.
With more than twenty years of experience in training mentor teachers, Rowley blends real-life stories with established research to help ...
Additional Info:
High-performance mentors are not born. Even experienced educators need training in order to provide constructive support to entry-year teachers. James B. Rowley's mentoring framework has been used to successfully train thousands of teachers to acquire the six essential behaviors of high-performance mentoring: committing, accepting, communicating, coaching, learning, and inspiring.
With more than twenty years of experience in training mentor teachers, Rowley blends real-life stories with established research to help readers
* Understand mentoring as a performance continuum with escalating developmental stages
* Improve assessment, communication, and coaching skills
* Reflect on the mentoring process and analyze mentoring relationships
* Utilize mentoring as a pathway to personal and professional growth
Designed for both experienced and novice mentor teachers, this book will also be an enormously useful resource for mentor program coordinators, trainers, staff developers, and principals who want to assure that participants grow in their teaching practice as a result of the mentoring experience.
(From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Introduction
ch. 2 Mentoring
ch. 3 Committing
ch. 4 Accepting
ch. 5 Communicating
ch. 6 Coaching
ch. 7 Learning
ch. 8 Inspiring
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The Sista' Network: African-American Women Faculty Successfully Negotiating the Road to Tenure

Book
Cooper, Tuesday L.
2006
Anker Publishing Company, Bolton, MA
LB2335.7.C66 2006
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Diversifying the Faculty   |   Mentoring Faculty

Additional Info:
The “Sista’ Network"”is a term used to describe the relationships between and among professional African-American women which enable them to assist one another in learning the unwritten rules and protocols of various professions. In the context of higher education, the Sista' Network can help new African-American women faculty learn the rules to “the Tenure Game.”
A qualitative inquiry into the lives and experiences of nine African-American women during ...
Additional Info:
The “Sista’ Network"”is a term used to describe the relationships between and among professional African-American women which enable them to assist one another in learning the unwritten rules and protocols of various professions. In the context of higher education, the Sista' Network can help new African-American women faculty learn the rules to “the Tenure Game.”
A qualitative inquiry into the lives and experiences of nine African-American women during various stages of the tenure process, this book partly explores general, practical considerations such as the tenure process; requirements for tenure; and negotiating the balance among teaching, research, service, and collegiality. Yet it delves further into the statistics of African-American women faculty in the academy; issues of isolation, mentoring, and networking; African-American women faculty and the tenure process; African-American feminist thought; and racism, sexism, and the politics of singularity.
Also included are 12 guiding principles for new African-American women faculty members embarking upon the tenure process. Carefully weaving African-American feminist thought with the literature on academic tenure and minority along with stories of women faculty’s experiences in the academy, the author creates an effective and engaging account for minority women embarking on the tenure journey themselves. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
About the Author
Preface
Acknowledgments

ch. 1 Introduction:The Challenges of African-American Women Faculty

ch. 2 Tenure
The Tenure Process
Requirements for Tenure

ch. 3 African-American Women Faculty in the Academy
The Statistics
Isolation, Mentoring, and Networking
The Tenure Process
African-American Feminist Thought

ch. 4 The Research Results
The Methodology and Structure
A Roundtable Discussion
The Tenure Process
Collegiality
Service and Mentoring
Isolation
Networking
Highlights and Lessons Learned

ch. 5 The Game of Tenure
Learning the Rules of the Tenure Game
Negotiating the Balance Among Teaching, Research, and Service
Collegiality as the Fourth Category of the Tenure Process
Finding a Mentor
The Trilogy: Racism, Sexism, and the Politics of Singularity
The Sista’ Network
Guiding Principles for African-American Women Faculty

ch. 6 Conclusion: Six Years Later

Appendix A: Research Design and Methods
Appendix B: Sample Interview Questions
Bibliography
Index
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Strategies for Teaching Assistant and International Teaching Assistant Development: Beyond Micro Teaching

Book
Ross, Catherine, and Jane Dunphy, eds.
2007
Jossey-Bass, A Wiley Imprint, San Francisco
LB2335.4.R67 2007
Topics: Mentoring Faculty   |   Leadership and Faculty Development   |   Doctoral Students and New Teachers

Additional Info:
From the Publisher
Written for anyone who works with graduate students to support their teaching efforts in American research universities, this book draws on the extensive experience of professional educators who represent a variety of programs throughout the United States. They understand the common constraints of many TA development classes, workshops, and programs, as well as the need for motivating and sophisticated techniques that are, at the same time, ...
Additional Info:
From the Publisher
Written for anyone who works with graduate students to support their teaching efforts in American research universities, this book draws on the extensive experience of professional educators who represent a variety of programs throughout the United States. They understand the common constraints of many TA development classes, workshops, and programs, as well as the need for motivating and sophisticated techniques that are, at the same time, practical and focused. Their contributions to this book have proven to be effective in developing the sophisticated communication skills required by TAs across the disciplines.


Table Of Content:
About the Authors
Foreword
Preface
Acknowledgments

Part I: TA Development
ch. 1 Getting Started
Acknowledging Teaching Fears: The Three-Minute Free Response (Janet Rankin)
An Approach to Successful Collaborative Learning (Nancy C McClure)
Blended Learning: Focusing on Effective Teaching Through Online Discussions and Concept Mapping (Gabriele Bauer)
Diversity in the Classroom: Working Effectively with Undergraduate ESL Students (Shawna Shapiro)
Engaging Students in Active Learning (Shawna Shapiro)
Identity and Authority in the Classroom: An Exercise for New TAs (Mary C Wright)
Planning and Facilitating Discussion (Phillip M Edwards, Stacy Grooters, Margaret Lawrence)
Problems, Pitfalls, and Surprises in Teaching: Mini Cases (Lori Breslow, J Mark Schuster)
Responding to Student Writing (Stacy Grooters, Jennie Dorman)
Stand and Deliver: Developing Impromptu Speaking Skills (Jane Dunphy)
A TA Orientation Plenary Session on University Policies and Resources for Teaching (Derek Bruff)
Teaching in Computer Classrooms (Shaun K Kane, Joe Hannah, Phillip M Edwards, Jennie Dorman)
Teaching in Lab Settings (Jennie Dorman, Michelle Smith, Sara O’Brien, Karen Freisem)

ch. 2 Advanced Skills
Classroom Management Skills: Expanding Your Repertoire (Lee Warren)
Determining Appropriate Course Goalsand Pacing: An Exercise for Advanced TAs (Allyson Polsky McCabe, Lu Zhang)
Developing Effective Consulting Skills (Michele Marincovich, Marcelo Clerici-Arias, Mariatte Denman, Robyn Wright Dunbar)
Interdisciplinary Soapbox (Jill Bible, Robyn Wright Dunbar)
Introduction to Online Teaching and Learning: Using Asynchronous Discussions Effectively (Mary C Wright)
Reaction and Response: Group Problem Solving and Effective Feedback (Jane Dunphy)
Teaching Practice: Emphasis on Active Learning (Tershia Pinder)

ch. 3 Professional Development
ASPECTS: Advancing Students’ Professional Excellence with Certificates in Teaching Series (Mark Decker)
Mock Search Committee: Introduction to the Teaching Philosophy (Judith Gibber)
Teaching Portfolio Overview: Peer and Whole Group Discussion (Gabriele Bauer)

Part II: ITA Development
ch. 4 Culture
Cultural Adjustments (Barbara Gourlay)
Diversity Awareness for ITAs (Doris Yaffe Shiffman)
High-Context Versus Low-Context Culture: Case Studies (Christine Liptak, Colleen Meyers, Kyoung-Ah Nam, Elena Stetsenko)
The High School Visit (Catherine Ross)
Interviews: Surveying College Undergraduates Who Attended High School in the United States (Margo Sampson, Vel Chesser, Stacey Lane Tice)

ch. 5 Pedagogy
American Teaching Performance (Pamela Pollock)
Movie-Based Activities for the ITA Course (Theresa L Pettit)
Pedagogical Uses of Critical Incidents Videos for ITAs (Stacey Lane Tice, Margo Sampson, Vel Chesser)
Practice Identifying and Teaching to a Variety of Learning Styles (Anne Halbert)
Preparing the ITA for Office Hours (Elizabeth Wittner)

ch. 6 Language
Departmental Introduction Speech (Kimberly Kenyon)
Developing Oral Communication Skills (Margaret Lawrence)
Discovering and Teaching the Vocabulary of the Academic Communities (Doris Yaffe Shiffman)
Editorial Jigsaw (Barbara Gourlay)
Fielding Questions: The IgNobel Prizes (Barbara Thompson)
The Fine Art of Q&A (Barbara Gourlay)
The Greek Alphabet: Speaking in Symbols (Barbara Gourlay)
"International Teaching Assistant of the Year" Speech (Kimberly Kenyon)
Mimicking American TA Discourse (Janet Goodwin)
Practicing Communication Strategies (Doris Yaffe Shiffman)
Presentation Summaries—Take Two! (Barbara Thompson)
Working with Authentic TA Discourse (Janet Goodwin)

Resources
Index
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Mentoring Early-Stage Faculty: Myths and Missing Elements

Book
Moody, JoAnn
2009
JoAnn Moody, San Diego
LB1731.4.M66 2009
Topics: Mentoring Faculty   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
As in her other work, JoAnn Moody demonstrates a keen understanding of the day-to-day challenges of faculty issues, drawing from careful research as well as from close connections to the issues facing early-stage faculty. She reminds us that effective mentoring is designed around a flexible set of approaches and cannot be based on what she appropriately labels myths.
Additional Info:
As in her other work, JoAnn Moody demonstrates a keen understanding of the day-to-day challenges of faculty issues, drawing from careful research as well as from close connections to the issues facing early-stage faculty. She reminds us that effective mentoring is designed around a flexible set of approaches and cannot be based on what she appropriately labels myths.

Table Of Content:
Section A: Myths & assumptions
Section B: Missing elements of the mentoring process
Section C: Missing elements in the design of formal mentoring program (e.g., workshops for mentors & mentees)
Section D: Supplementary materials (e.g., checklists, illustrations & discussion scenarios)
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The Mentee's Guide: Making Mentoring Work for You

Book
Zachary, Lois J.
2009
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco
HF5385.Z33 2009
Topics: Mentoring Faculty   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Praise for The Mentee's Guide

"The Mentee's Guide inspires and guides the potential mentee, provides new insights for the adventure in learning that lies ahead, and underscores my personal belief and experience that mentoring is circular. The mentor gains as much as the mentee in this evocative relationship. Lois Zachary's new book is a great gift." —Frances Hesselbein, chairman and founding president, Leader to Leader Institute

"...
Additional Info:
Praise for The Mentee's Guide

"The Mentee's Guide inspires and guides the potential mentee, provides new insights for the adventure in learning that lies ahead, and underscores my personal belief and experience that mentoring is circular. The mentor gains as much as the mentee in this evocative relationship. Lois Zachary's new book is a great gift." —Frances Hesselbein, chairman and founding president, Leader to Leader Institute

"Whether you are the mentee or mentor, born or made for the role, you will gain much more from the relationship by practicing the fun and easy A-to-Z principles of The Mentee's Guide by the master of excellence, Lois Zachary." —Ken Shelton, editor, Leadership Excellence

"With this deeply practical book filled with stories and useful exercises, Lois Zachary completes her groundbreaking trilogy on mentoring. Must-reading for those in search of a richer understanding of this deeply human relationship as well as anyone seeking a mentor, whether for new skills, job advancement, or deeper wisdom." —Laurent A. Parks Daloz, senior fellow, the Whidbey Institute, and author, Mentor: Guiding the Journey of Adult Learners

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Preface
Acknowledgments
The Authors

ch. 1 The Power and Process of Mentoring
ch. 2 Preparing Yourself to Make the Most of Mentoring
ch. 3 Finding and Getting to Know Your Mentor
ch. 4 Establishing Agreements with Your Mentor
ch. 5 Doing the Work
ch. 6 Coming to Closure with Your Mentor
ch. 7 Making the Transition to from Mentee to Mentor

Appendix: Digging Deeper: An Annotated List of Helpful Resources
References
Index
Cover image

New Teacher Mentoring: Hopes and Promise for Improving Teacher Effectiveness

Book
Moir, Ellen; Dara Barlin; Janet Gless; and Jan Miles
2009
Harvard Education Press, Cambridge, MA
LB1731.4.N49 2009
Topics: Mentoring Faculty   |   Leadership and Faculty Development   |   Doctoral Students and New Teachers

Additional Info:
This book is written for K-12 educational contexts, but many of its ideas and analyses can be applied to higher education contexts.
Additional Info:
This book is written for K-12 educational contexts, but many of its ideas and analyses can be applied to higher education contexts.

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgements
Introduction

Part I High-Quality New Teacher Mentoring
ch. 1 What We Know and Don't Know About Mentoring and Induction
ch. 2 The Principles of High-Quality Mentoring
ch. 3 Mentor Professional Development

Part II The Case Studies
ch. 4 Durham Public School
ch. 5 Boston Public Schools
ch. 6 New York City Department of Education
ch. 7 Chicago Public Schools

Part III Conclusions and Recommendations
ch. 8 Analyzing Trends: Strategies Honed, Questions Raised, Levers for Change
ch. 9 Implications and Recommendations for Educational Stakeholders

Notes
About the Authors
About the New Teacher Center
Index
Cover image

Good Mentoring: Fostering Excellent Practice in Higher Education

Book
Nakamura, Jeanne; Shernoff, David J.; Hooker, Charles H., and Csikszentmihalyi, Mihaly
2009
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco
Q181.N148 2009
Topics: Mentoring Faculty   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
We pass on our traits through our genes but our cherished values, beliefs, and practices are transmitted through those units of meaning called memes. This remarkable book provides an authoritative account of how 'good work' endures in the sciences—and has profound implications for the quality of work across the professional landscape.

This book should sow the seeds of greatness for protégés and mentors alike, and ...
Additional Info:
We pass on our traits through our genes but our cherished values, beliefs, and practices are transmitted through those units of meaning called memes. This remarkable book provides an authoritative account of how 'good work' endures in the sciences—and has profound implications for the quality of work across the professional landscape.

This book should sow the seeds of greatness for protégés and mentors alike, and well beyond the discipline of science. Mentoring lineages are the hallmark of disciplines that endure and have impact, a reality that the authors powerfully communicate.

Good Mentoring is a landmark study with implications for the continued vibrancy of any discipline. This is a fresh, eye-opening perspective on the social transmission of professional lineages. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
The Authors
Foreword
Preface
Acknowledgments

ch. 1 Why Mentoring?

Part One: Three Examples of Good Mentoring
ch. 2 The Naturalist
ch. 3 The Physician-Scientist
ch. 4 The Moralist

Part Two: How Good Mentoring Works
ch. 5 Values, Practices, and Knowledge Through the Generations
ch. 6 How Values, Practices, and Knowledge Are Transmitted
ch. 7 Supportive Relationships as the Context for Intergenerational Influence

Part Three: Promoting Good Mentoring
ch. 8 What Have We Learned?
ch. 9 Where Do We Go from Here?

Appendix A: Data Collection, Coding, and Analyses
Appendix B: Science Apprenticeship Study and Interview Questions
Appendix C: Global Code Sheet

References
Index
Article cover image

"From Mentor to Mentoring Networks: Mentoring in the New Academy"

Article
Sorcinelli, Mary Deane, and Yun, Jung
2007
Change, Vol. 39, No. 6, November-December 2007, pp. 58-61
Topics: Mentoring Faculty   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
The article discusses the emerging models of mentoring as a vital contribution to a successful academic career. Mentoring has been defined as one-to-one relationship win which an experienced faculty member guides and supports the career development of early-career faculty member and research on faculty development. The article highlights the faculty-development resources which were published since 2000 and offers fresh models, concepts and thinking on mentoring in higher education. The resources provides ...
Additional Info:
The article discusses the emerging models of mentoring as a vital contribution to a successful academic career. Mentoring has been defined as one-to-one relationship win which an experienced faculty member guides and supports the career development of early-career faculty member and research on faculty development. The article highlights the faculty-development resources which were published since 2000 and offers fresh models, concepts and thinking on mentoring in higher education. The resources provides new conceptualizations of mentoring, recent studies on mentoring, faculty-development programs and practices, and issues on gender and race.
TTR cover image

Modeling Lifelong Learning: Collaborative Teaching across Disciplinary Lines

TTR
Blanchard, Kathryn D.
2012
Teaching Theology and Religion 15, no. 4 (2012): 338-354
BL.T4 v.15 no. 4 2012
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Mentoring Faculty   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Most courses in colleges and universities are taught by only one instructor. This is often necessitated by the financial exigencies of educational institutions, but is also due to an academic tradition in which the ideal is a single expert teaching in a single discipline. The rapidly changing realities of both the higher education and job markets, however, have called the traditional ideal into question. Interdisciplinary collaborative teaching is one way ...
Additional Info:
Most courses in colleges and universities are taught by only one instructor. This is often necessitated by the financial exigencies of educational institutions, but is also due to an academic tradition in which the ideal is a single expert teaching in a single discipline. The rapidly changing realities of both the higher education and job markets, however, have called the traditional ideal into question. Interdisciplinary collaborative teaching is one way to adapt to the needs of twenty-first-century students, by modeling lifelong learning for students and inviting instructors to be more deliberately reflective about disciplinary assumptions, learning styles, and pedagogies.
Cover image

Getting Mentored in Graduate School

Book
Johnson, W. Brad, and Huwe, Jennifer M.
2002
American Psychological Association, Washington, DC
LB2371.J62 2003
Topics: Mentoring Faculty   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Getting Mentored in Graduate School is the first guide to mentoring relationships written exclusively for graduate students. Research has shown that students who are mentored enjoy many benefits, including better training, greater career success, and a stronger professional identity. Authors Johnson and Huwe draw directly from their own experiences as mentor and protégé to advise students on finding a mentor and maintaining the mentor relationship throughout graduate school.
<...
Additional Info:
Getting Mentored in Graduate School is the first guide to mentoring relationships written exclusively for graduate students. Research has shown that students who are mentored enjoy many benefits, including better training, greater career success, and a stronger professional identity. Authors Johnson and Huwe draw directly from their own experiences as mentor and protégé to advise students on finding a mentor and maintaining the mentor relationship throughout graduate school.

Conversational, accessible, and informative, this book offers practical strategies that can be employed not only by students pursuing mentorships but also by professors seeking to improve their mentoring skills. Johnson and Huwe arm readers with the tools they need to anticipate and prevent common pitfalls and to resolve problems that may arise in mentoring relationships.

This book is essential reading for students who want to learn and master the unwritten rules that lead to finding a mentor and getting more from graduate school and your career. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments

I. About Mentoring
ch. 1 What Mentoring Is
ch. 2 What a Mentor Can Do For You
ch. 3 Who Gets Mentored and Why

II. How to Find a Mentor
ch. 4 What to Look For in a Mentor
ch. 5 The Intentional Protégé: Initiating a Mentor Relationship

III. How to Manage the Mentor Relationship
ch. 6 Designing the Mentor Relationship
ch. 7 The Stages of Mentor Relationships (What to Expect)
ch. 8 Potential Problems (and How to Handle Them)
ch. 9 On Being an Excellent Protégé
ch. 10 Mentoring for Women and Minorities
ch. 11 Some Additional Ways to Get Mentored

References
Index
About the Authors
Cover image

The Elements of Mentoring, Revised Edition

Book
Johnson, W. Brad, and Ridley, Charles R.
2009
Palgrave Macmillan, New York
HF5385.J64 2008
Topics: Mentoring Faculty   |   Leadership and Faculty Development   |   Doctoral Students and New Teachers

Additional Info:
Patterned after Strunk and White's classic The Elements of Style, this new edition concisely summarizes the substantial existing research on the art and science of mentoring. The Elements of Mentoring reduces this wealth of published material on the topic to the sixty-five most important and pithy truths for supervisors in all fields. These explore what excellent mentors do, what makes an excellent mentor, how to set up a successful mentor-proté...
Additional Info:
Patterned after Strunk and White's classic The Elements of Style, this new edition concisely summarizes the substantial existing research on the art and science of mentoring. The Elements of Mentoring reduces this wealth of published material on the topic to the sixty-five most important and pithy truths for supervisors in all fields. These explore what excellent mentors do, what makes an excellent mentor, how to set up a successful mentor-protégé relationship, how to work through problems that develop between mentor and protégé, what it means to mentor with integrity, and how to end the relationship when it has run its course. Succinct and comprehensive, this is a must-have for any mentor or mentor-to-be. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
What Excellent Mentors Do: Matters of Skill
ch. 1 Select Your Protégés Carefully
ch. 2 Know Your Protégés
ch. 3 Expect Excellence (and Nothing Else) ch. 4 Affirm, Affirm, Affirm, and Then Affirm Some More
ch. 5 Provide Sponsorship
ch. 6 Be a Teacher and a Coach
ch. 7 Encourage and Support
ch. 8 Offer Counsel in Difficult Times
ch. 9 Protect When Necessary
ch. 10 Stimulate Growth with Challenging Assignments
ch. 11 Give Protégés Exposure and Promote Their Visibility
ch. 12 Nurture Creativity
ch. 13 Provide Correction -- Even When Painful
ch. 14 Narrate Growth and Development
ch. 15 Self-Disclose When Appropriate
ch. 16 Accept Increasing Friendship and Mutuality
ch. 17 Teach Faceting ch. 18 Be an Intentional Model
ch. 19 Display Dependability

Traits of Excellent Mentors: Matters of Style and Personality
ch. 20 Exude Warmth
ch. 21 Listen Actively
ch. 22 Show Unconditional Regard
ch. 23 Tolerate Idealization
ch. 24 Embrace Humor
ch. 25 Do Not Expect Perfection
ch. 26 Attend to Interpersonal Cues
ch. 27 Be Trustworthy
ch. 28 Respect Values
ch. 29 Do Not Stoop to Jealousy

Arranging the Mentor Protégé Relationship: Matters of Beginning
ch. 30 Carefully Consider the "Match"
ch. 31 Clarify Expectations
ch. 32 Define Relationship Boundaries
ch. 33 Consider Protégé Relationship Style
ch. 34 Describe Potential Benefits and Risks
ch. 35 Be Sensitive to Gender
ch. 36 Be Sensitive to Race and Ethnicity
ch. 37 Plan for Change at the Outset
ch. 38 Schedule Periodic Review or Evaluations

Knowing Thyself as a Mentor: Matters of Integrity
ch. 39 Consider the Consequences of Being a Mentor
ch. 40 Practice Self-Care
ch. 41 Be Productive
ch. 42 Make Sure You Are Competent
ch. 43 Hold Yourself Accountable
ch. 44 Respect the Power of Attraction
ch. 45 Accept the Burden of Power
ch. 46 Practice Humility
ch. 47 Never Exploit Protégés
ch. 48 Above All, Do No Harm
ch. 49 Slow Down the Process
ch. 50 Tell the Truth
ch. 51 Seek Consultation
ch. 52 Document Carefully
ch. 53 Dispute Your Irrational Thinking

Welcoming Change and Saying Goodbye: Matters of Closure
ch. 54 Welcome Change and Growth
ch. 55 Accept Endings
ch. 56 Find Helpful Ways to Say Goodbye
ch. 57 Mentor as a Way of Life

References
Index
Cover image

On Being a Mentor: A Guide for Higher Education

Book
Johnson, W. Brad
2007
Lawrence Erlbaum, Mahwah, NJ
LB1731.4.J64 2007
Topics: Mentoring Faculty   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
On Being a Mentor is the definitive guide for faculty in higher education who wish to mentor both students and junior faculty. It features strategies, guidelines, best practices, and recommendations for professors who wish to excel in this area. Written in a pithy style, this no-nonsense guide offers straightforward advice about managing problem mentorships and measuring mentorship outcomes. Practical cases studies, vignettes, and step-by-step guidelines illuminate the process of mentoring ...
Additional Info:
On Being a Mentor is the definitive guide for faculty in higher education who wish to mentor both students and junior faculty. It features strategies, guidelines, best practices, and recommendations for professors who wish to excel in this area. Written in a pithy style, this no-nonsense guide offers straightforward advice about managing problem mentorships and measuring mentorship outcomes. Practical cases studies, vignettes, and step-by-step guidelines illuminate the process of mentoring throughout.

Other outstanding features include:
*research-based advice on the rules of engagement for mentoring, mentor functions, qualities of good mentors, and methods for forming and managing student-faculty relationships;
*summaries of the common mentoring relationship phases and guidance for adhering to ethical principles when serving as a mentor;
*guidance about mentoring specific populations, including undergraduate and graduate students, faculty, and protégés who differ from the mentor in terms of sex and race; and
*recommendations for department chairs and deans on how to foster an academic culture of mentoring.

On Being a Mentor is intended for professors, department chairs, and deans in a variety of educational settings, including colleges, universities, and medical and law schools and is suitable for professors in all fields of study including the sciences, humanities, psychology, education, and management. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface

Part I: On Mentoring
ch. 1 Why Mentoring Matters
ch. 2 The Contours of Mentoring
ch. 3 Mentoring in Academic: A Glimpse Inside

Part II: On Being a Mentor
ch. 4 What Mentors Do: Mentoring Functions
ch. 5 Who Mentors Are: Mentorship-Facilitating Characteristics and Qualities
ch. 6 Designing a Mentorship
ch. 7 The Seasons of Mentorship: Common Relationship Phases
ch. 8 The Ethical Mentor: Doing No Harm

Part III: On Mentoring Specific Groups
ch. 9 Mentoring Undergraduates
ch. 10 Mentoring Graduate Students
ch. 11 Mentoring Junior Faculty
ch. 12 Mentoring Across Sex
ch. 13 Mentoring Across Race

Part IV: Managing Mentorship
ch. 14 Diagnosis and Treatment of Mentorship Dysfunction
ch. 15 Assessing Mentoring Outcomes
ch. 16 Recommendations for Department Chairs and Deans

References
Author of Index
Subject Index
Cover image

Transformative Conversations: A Guide to Mentoring Communities Among Colleagues in Higher Education

Book
Felton, Peter; Bauman, H-Kirksen L.; Kheriaty, Aaron; and Taylor, Edward
2013
John Wiley & Sons, San Francisco
LB1731.4.F45 2013
Topics: Faculty Well-Being   |   Mentoring Faculty   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: From the Inter-generational Mentoring Community project, which develops the next generation of academic leaders, comes formation mentoring, a process to enable faculty to recover, sustain, and further develop a sense of vocation, mission, and purpose. This book is a concise and practical guide to convening and sustaining these kinds of formation mentoring groups in higher education. It provides the necessary direction and structure ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: From the Inter-generational Mentoring Community project, which develops the next generation of academic leaders, comes formation mentoring, a process to enable faculty to recover, sustain, and further develop a sense of vocation, mission, and purpose. This book is a concise and practical guide to convening and sustaining these kinds of formation mentoring groups in higher education. It provides the necessary direction and structure to orient the process but is open-ended enough to apply across many settings and professional or educational disciplines. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Foreword: Rembering What The Ancients Knew
Introduction
Interlude: Finding the Time and Space for a More Meaningful Professional Life

ch. 1 What Is a Formation Mentoring Community?
Interlude: Message in a Bottle
ch. 2 Cultivating Growth: Conversation in Community
Interlude: Is There a Place for Me in a Formation Mentoring Community?
ch. 3 The Basics of Creating Formation Mentoring Communities on Your Campus
ch. 4 Collaborative Stewardship: Facilitating a Formation Mentoring Community
ch. 5 From Individual to Institutional Change: Ripples of Transformation

Afterword: Beyond The Small Group
Recommended Resources
Notes
Gratitudes
About the Authors
Index
Additional Info:
An independent professional development, training, and mentoring community of over 11,000 graduate students, post-docs and faculty members, dedicated to supporting academics in making successful transitions throughout their careers. Membership offers on-campus workshops, professional development and mentoring programs, discussion forums, newsletters, and resources
Additional Info:
An independent professional development, training, and mentoring community of over 11,000 graduate students, post-docs and faculty members, dedicated to supporting academics in making successful transitions throughout their careers. Membership offers on-campus workshops, professional development and mentoring programs, discussion forums, newsletters, and resources
Additional Info:
We hold students accountable for academic integrity, but rarely offer acknowledgements in our own syllabi. Katherine D. Harris recommends that educators "Develop syllabus citations practices"; "Use Creative Commons licenses on syllabi"; and "Build an archive of remixable syllabi." Many linked examples and resources.
Additional Info:
We hold students accountable for academic integrity, but rarely offer acknowledgements in our own syllabi. Katherine D. Harris recommends that educators "Develop syllabus citations practices"; "Use Creative Commons licenses on syllabi"; and "Build an archive of remixable syllabi." Many linked examples and resources.
Additional Info:
List of activities for mentors and mentees
Additional Info:
List of activities for mentors and mentees
Additional Info:
Research and review of top mentoring programs
Additional Info:
Research and review of top mentoring programs
Additional Info:
Extensive bibliography for mentoring women and faculty of color.
Additional Info:
Extensive bibliography for mentoring women and faculty of color.
Additional Info:
Extensive Bibliography for Mentoring Faculty of Color
Additional Info:
Extensive Bibliography for Mentoring Faculty of Color
Additional Info:
Short statement about formal and informal faculty mentoring, and then a sidebar with several websites related to faculty mentoring.
Additional Info:
Short statement about formal and informal faculty mentoring, and then a sidebar with several websites related to faculty mentoring.
Additional Info:
An extensive faculty mentoring guide produced by the University of Michigan. Includes: definitions, discussion of goals, and tips (for mentors and mentees).
Additional Info:
An extensive faculty mentoring guide produced by the University of Michigan. Includes: definitions, discussion of goals, and tips (for mentors and mentees).
Additional Info:
Annotated Bibliography on Mentoring from the University of Arozona
Additional Info:
Annotated Bibliography on Mentoring from the University of Arozona
Web cover image

Mentoring Minority Faculty Members

Web
Penn State University, Stewart, James B.
Topics: Mentoring Faculty

Additional Info:
"Best and Worst Practices in Mentoring 'Minority' Faculty" Diversity Workshop Presentation Slides
Additional Info:
"Best and Worst Practices in Mentoring 'Minority' Faculty" Diversity Workshop Presentation Slides
Web cover image

Walk Like a Duck

Web
Kreuter, Nate
Topics: Mentoring Faculty

Additional Info:
Short article encouraging those just entering tenure-track jobs, published in "Inside Higher Ed."
Additional Info:
Short article encouraging those just entering tenure-track jobs, published in "Inside Higher Ed."
Additional Info:
Brief overview of how to be a mentor, from Emory University
Additional Info:
Brief overview of how to be a mentor, from Emory University
Additional Info:
Brief overview of what to expect as a mentee, from Emory University
Additional Info:
Brief overview of what to expect as a mentee, from Emory University
Additional Info:
Describes “mentoring across differences,” to address relationships in which the two parties are different in ways such as race, culture, and gender but also is ways such as learning and communication styles, life experiences, and personal interests.
Additional Info:
Describes “mentoring across differences,” to address relationships in which the two parties are different in ways such as race, culture, and gender but also is ways such as learning and communication styles, life experiences, and personal interests.
Additional Info:
A description of the mentoring program at the University of San Francisco's Department of Education. See right sidebar for sample mentor and mentee survey forms and sample guidelines for faculty mentoring.
Additional Info:
A description of the mentoring program at the University of San Francisco's Department of Education. See right sidebar for sample mentor and mentee survey forms and sample guidelines for faculty mentoring.
Additional Info:
Topics Covered: Make the Expectations and Criteria for Promotion Clear; Facilitate the Acquisition of Resources to Meet these Expectations; Give Frequent and Accurate Feedback; Reduce the Impediments to Progress towards Promotion
Additional Info:
Topics Covered: Make the Expectations and Criteria for Promotion Clear; Facilitate the Acquisition of Resources to Meet these Expectations; Give Frequent and Accurate Feedback; Reduce the Impediments to Progress towards Promotion
Journal cover image

Team Teaching at the Collegiate Level

Journal Issue
Posman, Ellen; and Locklin, Reid B., eds.
2013
Spotlight on Teaching, October
BL41.S72
Topics: Course Design   |   Teaching Religion   |   Mentoring Faculty   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here: https://www.aarweb.org/node/1608
Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here: https://www.aarweb.org/node/1608

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Team Teaching in Religious Studies: Editor's Introduction (Ellen Posman, and Reid B. Locklin)
ch. 2 Embodies Religion, Embodied Teaching: Team Teaching "Food Religion" (Norma Baumel Joseph, and Leslie C. Orr)
ch. 3 Brain, Stomach and Soul (Cara Anthony, and Elsie Amel)
ch. 4 Building Interdisciplinary Networks: Team Teaching Benefits for Religious Studies Professors (Melissa Stewart, and Deborah Field)
ch. 5 Jews and Christians Learn from Memoirs: A Collegially Taught Course (Mary C. Boys, and Sarah Tauber)
ch. 6 Team Teaching India's Identities across State and National Borders (Amy L. Allocco, and Brian K. Pennington)
ch. 7 Team Teaching in Religious Studies: Suggested Resources
Cover image

Modeling Mentoring Across Race/Ethnicity and Gender: Practices to Cultivate the Next Generation of Diverse Faculty

Book
Turner, Caroline Sotello Viernes; and González, Juan Carlos, eds.
2015
Stylus, Sterling, VA
LB2371.4.M63 2015
Topics: Diversifying the Faculty   |   Mentoring Faculty

Additional Info:
While mentorship has been shown to be critical in helping graduate students persist and complete their studies, and enter upon and succeed in their academic careers, the under-representation of faculty of color and women in higher education greatly reduces the opportunities for graduate students from these selfsame groups to find mentors of their race, ethnicity or gender.

Recognizing that mentoring across gender, race and ethnicity inserts levels of ...
Additional Info:
While mentorship has been shown to be critical in helping graduate students persist and complete their studies, and enter upon and succeed in their academic careers, the under-representation of faculty of color and women in higher education greatly reduces the opportunities for graduate students from these selfsame groups to find mentors of their race, ethnicity or gender.

Recognizing that mentoring across gender, race and ethnicity inserts levels of complexity to this important process, this book both fills a major gap in the literature and provides an in-depth look at successful mentorships between senior white and under-represented scholars and emerging women scholars and scholars of color.

Following a comprehensive review of the literature, this book presents chapters written by scholars who share in-depth descriptions of their cross-gender and/or cross-race/ethnicity mentoring relationships. Each article is co-authored by mentors who are established senior scholars and their former protégés with whom they have continuing collegial relationships. Their descriptions provide rich insights into the importance of these relationships, and for developing the academic pipeline for women scholars and scholars of color.

Drawing on a comparative analysis of the literature and of the narrative chapters, the editors conclude by identifying the key characteristics and pathways for developing successful mentoring relationships across race, ethnicity or gender, and by offering recommendations for institutional policy and individual mentoring practice. For administrators and faculty concerned about diversity in graduate programs and academic departments, they offer clear models of how to nurture the productive scholars and teachers needed for tomorrow’s demographic of students; for under-represented students, they offer compelling narratives about the rewards and challenges of good mentorship to inform their expectations and the relationships they will develop as protégés. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword (Christine A. Stanley)
Preface (Caroline Sotello Viernes Turner)

ch. 1 What Does The Literature Tell Us About Mentoring Across Race/Ethnicity and Gender? (Caroline Sotello Viernes Turner and Juan Carlos González)
ch. 2 Building Cross-Gender Mentorship in Academe: A Chicano-Latina/Filipina Relationship Built on Common Scholarly Commitments (Juan Carlos González and Caroline Sotello Viernes Turner)
ch. 3 Socialization in Academe: Reflections on Mentoring by a Latina-Filipina Mentor and an African American Male Protégé (J. Luke Wood and Caroline Sotello Viernes Turner)
ch. 4 Breaking Through Racial and Gender Barriers: Reflections on Dissertation Mentorship and Peer Support (Edward P. St. John, O. Cleveland Hill, Ontario S. Wooden, and Penny A. Pasque)
ch. 5 Latina Faculty and Latino Male Student Mentorship Processes: Aprendiendo y Compartiendo Juntos (Jeanett Castellanos and Mark A. Kamimura-Jiménez)
ch. 6 A Critical Race Journey of Mentoring (Dimpal Jain and Daniel Solorzano)
ch. 7 Cross-Gender Mentoring From a Caribbean Perspective (Christine A. Stanley and Dave A. Louis)
ch. 8 Autoethnography/Testimonio, Common Sense Racism, and the Politics of Cross-Gender Mentoring (Elvia Romero and Alfredo Mirandé)
ch. 9 Anaalysis of the Mentor-Protégé Narratives: Reflecting The Literature (Juan Carlos González and Caroline Sotello Viernes Turner)
ch. 10 Analysis of the Mentor-Protégé Narratives: Contributing To The Literature and Emerging Mentoring Model for Practice (Caroline Sotello Viernes Turner and Juan Carlos González)

About the Editors
About the Authors
Index
Cover image

An Empty Seat in Class: Teaching and Learning After the Death of a Student

Book
Ayers, Rick
2015
Teachers College Press, New York, NY
LB1027.5.A96 2015
Topics: Classroom Management   |   Adult Learners   |   18-22 Year Olds   |   Faith in the Classroom   |   Mentoring Faculty

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: The death of a student, especially to gun violence, is a life-changing experience that occurs with more and more frequency in America’s schools. For each of these tragedies, there is a classroom and there is a teacher. Yet student death is often a forbidden subject, removed from teacher education and professional development classes where the curriculum is focused instead on learning about ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: The death of a student, especially to gun violence, is a life-changing experience that occurs with more and more frequency in America’s schools. For each of these tragedies, there is a classroom and there is a teacher. Yet student death is often a forbidden subject, removed from teacher education and professional development classes where the curriculum is focused instead on learning about standards, lesson plans, and pedagogy. What can and should teachers do when the unbearable happens? An Empty Seat in Class illuminates the tragedy of student death and suggests ways of dealing and healing within the classroom community. This book weaves the story of the author’s very personal experience of a student’s fatal shooting with short pieces by other educators who have worked through equally terrible events and also includes contributions from counselors, therapists, and school principals. Through accumulated wisdom, educators are given the means and the resources to find their own path to healing their students, their communities, and themselves. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Prologue: A Teacher Holds on to a Dying Student

Introduction

ch. 1 Improvising
ch. 2 The Mystery - The Literacy of Loss: Youth Creation of RIP T-Shirts (Lanette Jimerson)
ch. 3 Taking Care of the Caregivers - 1/30. Bloodroot. After Tupac (Molly Raynor)
ch. 4 Wrong Steps - Notes on a Classroom Responding to the Death of a Student (Jaimie Stevenson)
ch. 5 White Teacher
ch. 6 Good Guys, Bad Guys - On Losing Students (Crystal Laura) A Letter (David Stovall)
ch. 7 Our Worst Nightmare - Instinctually, Teachers Are Eternal Optimists (Lee Keylock)
ch. 8 Mortality in Its Many Forms - Losing Kyle—Automobile Accident (Hasmig Minassian) Remembering Angél (Godhuli Bose)
ch. 9 Teacher Education - Addressing the Issue in the Academy (Leora Wolf-Prusan) Youth Poetry Teacher: Losing a Student and a Friend (Donte Clark)
ch. 10 What Schools Can Do

Afterword: From the Counselor and Therapist (Cori Bussolari)
References
Index
About the Author
Cover image

Navigating the Dissertation: Strategies for New Doctoral Advising Faculty and Their Advisees

Book
Di Pierro, Marianne
2014
New Forums Press, Stillwater, OK
LB2386.D5 2014
Topics: Mentoring Faculty   |   Leadership and Faculty Development   |   Doctoral Students and New Teachers

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: This book examines the intricacies of the doctoral educational process and delineates a process for continuous improvement that will shape and enhance better professional relationships between dissertation advisors and their advisees and cultivate opportunities for increased retention and graduation. The book includes critical principles, interwoven with students’ real life experiences which serve as illustrative vehicles. Moreover, its innovative approach – a book written for ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: This book examines the intricacies of the doctoral educational process and delineates a process for continuous improvement that will shape and enhance better professional relationships between dissertation advisors and their advisees and cultivate opportunities for increased retention and graduation. The book includes critical principles, interwoven with students’ real life experiences which serve as illustrative vehicles. Moreover, its innovative approach – a book written for new advisors and their advisees or for seasoned advisors seeking new ways to communicate with their advisees – departs from other books that provide generally only a one-dimensional view, usually from the student’s perspective. The titles of many of these are couched in metaphors of survival and overcoming a threat, rather than centered in strong initiatives that will lead to timely graduation in a supportive and encouraging environment. This book offers innovative and pioneering leadership approaches to transport advisors and advisees to a successful outcome. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Preface

ch. 1 Dissertation Advising: The Need for Collaborative Training Models
ch. 2 The Rules of Engagement
ch. 3 Defining Editing Expectations: More Rules of Engagement
ch. 4 The Toxic Committee
ch. 5 Considerations When Forming a Committee: For Advisees
ch. 6 Selection of the Advisee: For Faculty
ch. 7 Other Considerations for the Advisor as Leader
ch. 8 Vetting the Committee
ch. 9 Discovering the Dissertation Topic
ch. 10 The Concept Paper and the Quality Circle Review
ch. 11 Implementation of Editorial Commentary and Technology
ch. 12 Naming Conventions for Maintaining Draft Files
ch. 13 Working Against the Grain: For Advisors
ch. 14 Working Against the Grain: For Advisees
ch. 15 Dissertation Proposal and the Human Subject Institutional Review Board (HSIRB)
Protocol: Symmetry in Design
ch. 16 Preparing for the Oral Defense of the Dissertation: 17 Easy Steps
ch. 17 Bill of Rights for the Advisee/Advisor
ch. 18 Combating the  Dissertation Blues: Comprehensive Examinations - The Prelude
ch. 19 The Dissertation Writing Blues
ch. 20 The Dissertation Aftermath Blues
ch. 21 Debriefing: An Essential Final Step in Doctoral Education
ch. 22 New Forms and New Paradigms
ch. 23 Personalizing Academic Misconduct: An Approach for the Graduate Classroom
ch. 24 The Future of Doctoral Education: A Visionary Perspective
ch. 25 Quick Takes

About the Author
Index of Book
Additional Info:
This 6 page essay from the Association of American Colleges & Universities (AAC&U) deals with the different levels of investing in faculty: preparing graduate students to be successful future faculty; supporting new faculty entering the college/university; the mentoring of faculty close to retirement who have invested their lives in the support of education. Publisher: Project Kaleidoscope
Additional Info:
This 6 page essay from the Association of American Colleges & Universities (AAC&U) deals with the different levels of investing in faculty: preparing graduate students to be successful future faculty; supporting new faculty entering the college/university; the mentoring of faculty close to retirement who have invested their lives in the support of education. Publisher: Project Kaleidoscope
Cover image

Faculty Mentoring: A Practical Manual for Mentors, Mentees, Administrators, and Faculty Developers

Book
Phillips, Susan L. and Dennison, Susan T.
2015
Stylus, Sterling, VA
LB1731.4.P54 2015
Topics: Mentoring Faculty   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

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Abstract: Faculty mentoring programs greatly benefit the institutions that have instituted them, and are effective in attracting and retaining good faculty.

Prospective faculty members commonly ask about mentoring at on-campus interviews, and indicate that it is a consideration when choosing a position. Mentoring programs also increase the retention rate of junior faculty, greatly reducing recruitment costs, and particularly help integrate women, minority ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Faculty mentoring programs greatly benefit the institutions that have instituted them, and are effective in attracting and retaining good faculty.

Prospective faculty members commonly ask about mentoring at on-campus interviews, and indicate that it is a consideration when choosing a position. Mentoring programs also increase the retention rate of junior faculty, greatly reducing recruitment costs, and particularly help integrate women, minority and international faculty members into the institution, while providing all new hires with an orientation to the culture, mission and identity of the college or university.

The book provides step-by-step guidelines for setting up, planning, and facilitating mentoring programs for new faculty members, whether one-on-one, or using a successful group model developed and refined over twenty-five years by the authors. While it offers detailed guidance on instituting such programs at the departmental level, it also makes the case for establishing school or institutional level programs, and delineates the considerable benefits and economies of scale these can achieve.

The authors provide guidance for mentors and mentees on developing group mentoring and individual mentor / protégé relationships – the corresponding chapters being available online for separate purchase; as well as detailed outlines and advice to department chairs, administrators and facilitators on how to establish and conduct institution-wide group mentoring programs, and apply or modify the material to meet their specific needs.

For training and faculty development purposes, we also offer two chapters as individual e-booklets. Each respectively provides a succinct summary of the roles and expectations of the roles of Mentor and Mentee.

Faculty Mentoring / Mentor Guide

The booklets are affordably priced, and intended for individual purchase by mentors and mentees, and are only available through our Web site. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword (Milton D. Cox)
Acknowledgments
Introduction: Overview and Purpose of the Manual

ch. 1 Tips for Mentors Inside or Outside the Department
ch. 2 Guidelines for Setting Up, Planning, and Facilitating a Mentoring Group
ch. 3 New Faculty Tips on Having a Successful Mentoring Experience
ch. 4 Tips for Guidance of Departmental Mentoring
ch. 5 Guidelines for Administrators
ch. 6 Advice for the Director of a Faculty Mentoring Program
ch. 7 Review of Mentoring in the Higher Education Literature

Appendices
Appendix A: Book and Web Resources
Appendix B: Relationship-Building Exercises
Appendix C: Active Mentoring Worksheets
Appendix D: Closure Activities
Appendix E: Group Mentoring Materials
Appendix F: Program Implementation Materials
Appendix G: Program Assessment Materials
Appendix H: Department-Level Materials
Appendix I: Sample Program Documents

About the Authors
Index
Cover image

Mentoring as Transformative Practice: Supporting Student and Faculty Diversity: New Directions for Higher Education, Number 171

Book
Turner, Caroline S., ed.
2015
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA (New Directions for Higher Education, Number 171)
LB1731.4.M455 2015
Topics: Mentoring Students   |   Mentoring Faculty   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

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Abstract: Scholars examining how women and people of color advance in academia invariably cite mentorship as one of the most important factors in facilitating student and faculty success.

Contributors to this volume underscore the importance of supporting one another, within and across differences, as critical to the development of a diverse professoriate. This volume emphasizes and highlights:

- the importance ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Scholars examining how women and people of color advance in academia invariably cite mentorship as one of the most important factors in facilitating student and faculty success.

Contributors to this volume underscore the importance of supporting one another, within and across differences, as critical to the development of a diverse professoriate. This volume emphasizes and highlights:

- the importance of mentorship;
- policies, processes, and practices that result in successful mentoring relationships;
- real life mentoring experiences to inform students, beginning faculty, and those who would be mentors;
- evidence for policy makers about what works in the development of supportive and nurturing higher education learning environments.

The guiding principles underlying successful mentorships, interpersonally and programmatically, presented here can have the potential to transform higher education to better serve the needs of all its members.

This is the 171st volume of the Jossey-Bass quarterly report series New Directions for Higher Education. Addressed to presidents, vice presidents, deans, and other higher education decision makers on all kinds of campuses, it provides timely information and authoritative advice about major issues and administrative problems confronting every institution. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Editor’s Notes (Caroline S. Turner)

ch. 1 Mentoring Outside the Line: The Importance of Authenticity, Transparency, and Vulnerability in Effective Mentoring Relationships (Sharon Fries-Britt, Jeanette Snider)
Informed by the literature and professional practice, this chapter examines the unique mentoring challenges facing women and underrepresented minorities in higher education. Findings indicate that traditional mentoring approaches fall short in fully supporting the needs of underrepresented populations in higher education.

ch. 2 Digging Deeper: Exploring the Relationship Between Mentoring, Developmental Interactions, and Student Agency (Kimberly A. Griffin, Jennifer L. Eury, Meghan E. Gaffney, with Travis York, Jessica Bennett, Emil Cunningham, Autumn Griffin)
While many cite the importance of having a mentor, focusing on the quality and nature of specific interactions between students and faculty can lead to better strategies promoting student agency. This chapter presents narratives from students who work with the same mentor, focusing on their interactions and how they shaped students’ experiences and outcomes.

ch. 3 Critical Mentoring Practices to Support Diverse Students in Higher Education: Chicana/Latina Faculty Perspectives (Julie L´opez Figueroa, Gloria M. Rodriguez)
This chapter outlines critical practices that emerged from utilizing social justice frameworks to mentor first-generation, underrepresented minority students at the undergraduate to doctoral levels. The mentoring strategies include helping students to reframe instances when faculty and peers unconsciously conflate academic rigor with color-blind scholarship.

ch. 4 Educational Testimonio: Critical Pedagogy as Mentorship (Rebeca Burciaga, Natalia Cruz Navarro)
This chapter chronicles the use of educational testimonio as one approach to critical pedagogy as mentoring in a college classroom. Written from the perspectives of an instructor and a student, it explores educational testimonio as one tool that has implications beyond the classroom, including retention in higher education and supporting the development of aspirations beyond undergraduate schools on the path to the professoriate.

ch. 5 Of Feral Faculty and Magisterial Mowglis: The Domestication of Junior Faculty (Richard J. Reddick)
This chapter presents an assistant professor’s scholarly personal narrative at the precipice of promotion, and reveals how the feral child metaphor might aptly describe many junior professors’ experiences as they navigate a path toward tenure. This chronicling of mentorship in sometimes unexpected venues may aid new faculty and those invested in their success in both earning tenure and retaining them in the field.

ch. 6 Providing the Psychosocial Benefits of Mentoring to Women in STEM: CareerWISE as an Online Solution (Amy E. Dawson, Bianca L. Bernstein, Jennifer M. Bekki)
This chapter outlines the psychosocial aspects of mentoring that help women combat the barriers they commonly face in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). The authors describe the CareerWISE online resilience training and how it can address the shortage of effective mentors and role models who have been shown to increase the persistence of women in STEM fields.

ch. 7 Transforming the Undergraduate Research Experience Through Sustained Mentoring: Creating a Strong Support Network and a Collaborative Learning Environment (Erika T. Camacho, Raquell M. Holmes, Stephen A. Wirkus)
This chapter describes how sustained mentoring together with rigorous collaborative learning and community building contributed to successful mathematical research and individual growth in the Applied Mathematical Sciences Summer Institute (AMSSI), a program that focused on women, underrepresented minorities, and individuals from small teaching institutions who might not have had the opportunity to do research otherwise. The collective learning and developmental experiences of AMSSI’s cofounders as students, teaching assistants, and faculty in other research programs, together with their humble upbringings and cultural histories, are what define the unique structure and mentoring blueprint of AMSSI.

ch. 8 Developing a Latino Mentoring Program: Project MALES (Mentoring to Achieve Latino Educational Success) (Victor B. S´aenz, Luis Ponjuan, Jorge Segovia Jr., Jos´e Del Real Viramontes)
This chapter highlights the development of Project MALES (Mentoring to Achieve Latino Educational Success). At the center of Project MALES is a mentoring program that aims to cultivate an engaged support network for males of color at the University of Texas at Austin and across surrounding communities. Specifically, there is a discussion of the theories and framework that guided the creation of this mentoring program and its ongoing development.

ch. 9 Weaving Authencity and Legitimacy: Latina Faculty Peer Mentoring (Anne-Marie N´u˜ nez, Elizabeth T. Murakami, Leslie D. Gonzales)
As an alternative to typical top-down mentoring models, the authors advance a conception of peer mentoring that is based on research about collectivist strategies that Latina faculty employ to navigate the academy. The authors advance recommendations for institutional agents to support mentoring for faculty who are members of historically underrepresented groups.

ch. 10 Enacting Feminist Alliance Principles in a Doctoral Writing Support Group (Beth Blue Swadener, Lacey Peters, Kimberly A. Eversman)
This study utilizes a multivocal narrative approach to analyze the dynamics, accomplishments, and challenges of an interdisciplinary doctoral support group consisting primarily of female members. The authors raise issues of power, alliance, troubling expert-novice models of mentoring, and the role of social justice pedagogy in the group.

Index
TTR cover image

Response to Kathleen Fisher’s Look Before You Leap

TTR
Fort, Andrew O.; and Komjathy, Louis
2017
Teaching Theology and Religion 20, no. 1 (2017): 22-27
BL41.T4 v.20 no. 1
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Assessing Students   |   Faith in the Classroom   |   Mentoring Faculty

Additional Info:
This article provides two short responses to Kathleen M. Fisher's essay “Look Before You Leap: Reconsidering Contemplative Pedagogy,” published in this issue of the journal.
Additional Info:
This article provides two short responses to Kathleen M. Fisher's essay “Look Before You Leap: Reconsidering Contemplative Pedagogy,” published in this issue of the journal.
TTR cover image
Wabash tree

Teaching About Teaching Sexuality and Religion

TTR
Stephens, Darryl W.
2017
Teaching Theology and Religion 20, no. 2 (2017): 189-199
Topics: Learning Designs   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice   |   Mentoring Faculty   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Classroom instructors implementing pedagogical strategies for embodied learning about sexuality and religion need institutional support and assistance from colleagues and mentors to be successful. One means of providing institutional and peer support for classroom instructors is to host and lead a pedagogy workshop. Building on the work of Ott and Stephens on embodied learning and other articles and teaching tactics found throughout this issue of Teaching Theology and Religion, this ...
Additional Info:
Classroom instructors implementing pedagogical strategies for embodied learning about sexuality and religion need institutional support and assistance from colleagues and mentors to be successful. One means of providing institutional and peer support for classroom instructors is to host and lead a pedagogy workshop. Building on the work of Ott and Stephens on embodied learning and other articles and teaching tactics found throughout this issue of Teaching Theology and Religion, this article presents a sample design for a two-hour workshop with faculty and/or graduate teaching assistants on the topic of teaching sexuality and religion. Non-expert facilitators can lead this workshop and it is intended to start a conversation about pedagogy rather than to provide definitive answers to end the discussion. The goals are to demystify a taboo topic and to provide concrete strategies for teaching that will promote responsible engagement and a better-integrated learning experience for students.